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Discussion Starter #1
It started out as a very simple project. I was working late with the tractor several nights in a row, and I was getting back to the garage after dusk. Each time, it was too dark to back into the garage. I had to get off the tractor, turn on a light in the garage, then get back on the tractor and back it in. A backup light would sure be nice.

So I obtained a couple of LED lights and started planning their installation. Then, I thought it might be nice to have some work lights. Sometimes when you work into dusk, you run out of light with just a little work left. With these, I could finish what I had started.

While still pondering this growing project, I had a close call plowing on our main road. The tractor needs more visibility, especially when working perpendicular to the traffic flow. When you are turned sideways in the road to clean out a driveway, none of the standard lighting or reflectors are visible. So I added 4 high intensity LED strobe lights at strategic locations. These lights could also double as marker lights if the strobe wasn’t necessary.

Then I had a day with a lot of backing, and ended up with a sore neck. I have a harder time twisting around as I age, and I’ve worried about missing something behind me. So a backup camera system made its way into the project.

The plan is shown in the attached photo and pdf. I’ve now implemented the vast majority of it.

The backup lights are triggered by the 1025R’s internal switch on the “reverse” pedal. Initially, they flash for a couple seconds in a unique pattern to warn of the reverse motion, then go on solid. There is also a switch to turn on the backup lights to use as secondary rear work lights.

The work lights turn on from their own switch; they are not linked to the other lighting on the tractor. Both the work lights switch and the “rear” lights switch are located on the right side console where they can be reached from either seating position.

The “strobe” switch is on the front console along with a programming button to change the pattern on the strobe lights.

The camera system was challenging. I wanted a camera mounted up high so that I had a bird’s eye view behind the tractor. I’m pleased with this capability and I’ve been using it in recent projects. And I think I’ve satisfied the big challenge of finding a place for a monitor on an open station tractor that is clearly visible without blocking any critical views.

I will begin posting photos and more details about each aspect of this project over the next few weeks. I’ve been doing some real world testing to make sure everything is solid. There were times I regretted the ongoing expansion of the project, but now that it’s close to completion I’m glad I did it all. I have a few minor issues to resolve that emerged during final testing and actual use. I’m getting to those as quickly as I can. Yes, more ACTION is still necessary. A project this big is tough to complete when you use your tractor regularly. Laying in all the new wiring harnesses is time consuming and really disables the tractor while it is being completed.

Keane

Auxiliary Lighting 1025R.jpg
 

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Very good! I had the same idea about 8-years ago. I'll be curious as to what camera(s) and monitor you end up using. The camera system is disappointing for me as the amount of glare on the monitor washes out the picture, and the narrow angle camera is defective. That's what I get for buying cheap Chinesium crap off of Fleabay.

Lights, Camera, ACTION! - Google Photos
 

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While still pondering this growing project, I had a close call plowing on our main road. The tractor needs more visibility, especially when working perpendicular to the traffic flow. When you are turned sideways in the road to clean out a driveway, none of the standard lighting or reflectors are visible. So I added 4 high intensity LED strobe lights at strategic locations. These lights could also double as marker lights if the strobe wasn’t necessary.
Nice job. I had the same concerns with my 2720 so I put a Class-1 LED strobe light up top. That gives 360-degree visibility to surrounding traffic.
 

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Would to see pictures on the strobes and if you could tell us what equipment you used. I really need some strobes on mine for visibility. I drive mine on the road to my Fathers house to take care of his property

Edit: Sorry did not see that you had already posted photos above
 

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Would to see pictures on the strobes and if you could tell us what equipment you used. I really need some strobes on mine for visibility. I drive mine on the road to my Fathers house to take care of his property
Not sure what OP used but I would highly recommend LEDs by Feniex. Multiple patterns, color options, mounting options. I am building a custom bar for ROPS with multicolor light heads between 40° and 180° using feniex light heads and mini 4200 switch.

They are class 1 and super cheap compared to whelen, federal signal, etc. but way better quality than eBay/amazon vendors.


2018 1025R TLB (120R/260B), 54" MMM auto connect/mulch, 54" rear snow blower (SB1154), 60” FEL mounted snow blade (AF10F), iMatch, Heavy Hitch and bolt on toothbar, Ken's bolt on hooks, diff lock, seat springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Lighting and Camera Additions to ROPS

My design goals for my up-high work lights were as follows:

1. Keep everything inside the ROPS to minimize the potential damage from trees.
2. Mount the lights as high as possible to reduce shadows beyond the front implements.
3. Get as much separation between the 2 work lights as possible to reduce shadows.
4. Utilize the same light fixtures for both forward and rear illumination.
5. Have the fixtures easy to switch from forward to rear and vice versa.
6. Produce enough light to facilitate work but don’t scorch the earth.

I came up with a concept to achieve these goals and then implemented it in a wood 1:1 scale model. On a temporary basis, I wired the lights into the 12V socket on the right console. Then, I took it out in the dark to see if the positions of the lights would provide the illumination that I wanted. (Nothing surprises my neighbors anymore.) The inexpensive LED fixtures really did a great job of lighting up my property. There was no shadow from the operator unless the operator leaned far forward. I’m 6’2” so this was a concern for me.

ROPS assys 1.jpg

So then I implemented the model in metal. The support for the lighting and camera consists of 2 clamps that don’t compromise the ROPS, a 1 foot long, 2”X2” stainless steel tube, and a piece of C-channel.

The foot-long metal tube serves the following purposes:

1. A spacer to move the C-channel down below the curves of the ROPS.
2. A place to mount the forward and rear high-intensity LED strobe lights.
3. A place to hide all the wiring connections and protect them from the elements.

Although I made every effort to make the inside of the tube moisture proof, I know it is not likely in some of the horizontal blizzards that I work in. So I used waterproof connectors and cut drain holes in the bottom of the tube. They are hidden by the C-channel piece and the camera bracket. The tube shouldn’t rust since it is stainless steel.

ROPS assys 2.jpg

ROPS assys 3.jpg

ROPS assys 4.jpg

The mounting bolts on the work light brackets are spring loaded. I can pull down on each light and rotate it between facing front and rear. The edge of the bracket locks against the edge of the C-channel and keeps each light in the position that it is placed in. Plastic edging is glued to the edges of the light brackets so that no metal-to metal contact exists. There is no rattling or paint damage during use.

Here’s a video of changing the lighting direction:


I couldn't think of a situation where I would need the work lighting in both the forward and rear scenarios at the same time. But I can always face one light forward and the other back if I need to. Each of these lights provides significant illumination.

ROPS assys 6.jpg

The camera between the work lights has an optimal view for backing up and connecting to implements. There is significant visibility not only behind the tractor, but to the sides as well. I’ll demonstrate this in a future post.

The next 2 photos show the mounting of the backup lights, the side strobe lights, and the direct rear-view cameras. These cameras look straight back and let me monitor traffic approaching behind me when I’m in the road plowing. I need both of them because I occasionally plow against traffic. Also, if the backhoe is on the tractor, both views can be necessary to compensate for the blind spot created by the backhoe. There is no good central location on the tractor to mount just one rear-facing camera.

ROPS assys 7.jpg

ROPS assys 8.jpg


I’ll provide more detail about the function of each of these lights and the video system in subsequent posts.
 

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I'm as motivated to do tractor related projects to excess as most folks here.

But, why not just buy a remote key fob and wire the garage lights to turn on and off with it from the tractor?

And for visibility, a magnetic flasher or strobe light that plugs into the 12V outlet?
:dunno:

BTW, does your ROPS clear your garage door when you back in, or do you have to get off and fold it?

I like the installation.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I'm as motivated to do tractor related projects to excess as most folks here.

But, why not just buy a remote key fob and wire the garage lights to turn on and off with it from the tractor?

And for visibility, a magnetic flasher or strobe light that plugs into the 12V outlet?
:dunno:

BTW, does your ROPS clear your garage door when you back in, or do you have to get off and fold it?

I like the installation.


As I mentioned in the opening post, it was a snowballing project that probably got out of hand. I don't think I'll ever tackle a project this big again. Electrical work is very hard on the hands. But, I am very pleased with the results as I continue to test them with actual use. I'm working to put together all the details for posts that will answer most of these questions.

Unlike you, I do use my tractor at night. When I was working, it was always dark during the winter when I was home from work and therefore most of my plowing was done early in the morning or at night. I'm retired now, but I still have constraints that have me plowing at night occasionally. If we get a snow that's coming down very hard and fast, sometimes I have to plow at night just to keep up with it. I've even mowed at night several times when time contraints required it. It is much cooler and it's not hard to achieve a smooth job with the basic lighting on the tractor.

Backing into the dark garage triggered my awareness that backup lights would be handy, but that's not my only reason for wanting them. As I get around to posting full details on them, you'll see that they also serve as a visible backup warning device and as secondary work lights for behind the tractor. The warning system is especially important when I'm working on the public road off my property. And, I enjoy the challenge of complex projects like this one. My tractor is certainly not "factory" at this point, but I sure hope it looks that way. The later years of my career were in management. I didn't get much of this kind of "hands on" creative work.

My ROPS does not need to be lowered to get into my garage. But I did design these additions to my tractor such that the ROPS can still be lowered. In fact, I lowered it to install everything at the top because it was much easier. However, I recently had an incident where for some reason my garage door did not fully open when I was backing in and I hit the door. Fortunately, I was going very slowly. But there was still some damage. Now I'm trying to figure out if this qualifies me for membership in "the club". I'll probably need some sort of ruling to find out.

I'll get more details posted as soon as I can. I know there are big gaps in my posts so far. I'll work on backup lights next.
 

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Soooo, the deer will no longer be able to say they didn't see you, officer, when you pull them over and right them a citation for poaching dinner from your garden and your pine buds.:lol:
 

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:unknown:if u hit the garage door whether backing in or pulling out.............then ur in the club now.:lol: sorry u had to join ---just wait till u do it again.:mocking:

:hide: don't ask me what my number is -ok.

pst. number 2:laugh:
 

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When the sun sets the cameras work good no glare on the monitor. I had glare even with a 3" hood during the day so I removed mine and put it in the Dodge for Wal-Mart! Seems people at Wal-Mart are trying to get hit as they keep walking behind me when I am backing up??? Not sure if there looking for a lawsuit?
 

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That was my experience with my monitor. During twilight hours or heavily overcast skies it was fine. It also worked well at night thanks to the infrared LED's; but during a sunny day the glare just washed out the image that it was worthless regardless of how I tweaked the contrast settings.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Backup Lights

While deciding how to implement backup lights, I concluded that there were really two objectives. The obvious one is to provide light when backing up in the dark. My other goal was to provide warning that I was backing up. Backup lights can be sort of like a turn signal for going backwards. I know they’ve prevented many an accident in the grocery store parking lots. I see the warning feature as important when I’m using the tractor around other people or in the road cleaning out driveways. I’ve had several close calls when people try to “sneak” behind me just as I’m starting to back up. I think the warning will help. I also considered a backup beeper, but I think everybody would hear it except for that one person that you really wanted to hear it.

I incorporated a brake light flasher in the backup light circuit to draw attention to the backup lights. These flasher modules are used on busy freeways to prevent rear end accidents by people texting while driving. Instead of the brake lights just coming on, they flash in some unexpected way (to those observing them). This module is very programmable. You can select the duration of the flashing, the frequency of the flashes, and even vary the frequency. I programmed mine on my workbench and experimented to get a good 2-second flash pattern. The programming directions were decent and I was done within 20 minutes.

The backup lights trigger when the reverse pedal is pressed. They flash for about 2 seconds and then go to solid “on”. The flashing varies in frequency to maximize the attention it will get. If you let up on the reverse pedal just momentarily, the flashing pattern won’t repeat. The backup lights will just go on again, continuing the solid “on” state. But if you take longer, when you reengage the pedal you’ll get the flashing for 2 seconds again. The video below shows both situations:


In this video, I deliberately kept the camera at an angle on the sidelines so that the lights didn't wash out the picture. This video was taken at the end of the day. Even in broad daylight, these lights are very visible if you are facing them.

Using the existing switch on the tractor’s reverse pedal to drive this circuit was not hard. After you remove the floor and cowling beneath the seat, you can find the switch by pushing on the reverse pedal with your hand. The linkage will move and you can easily see which switch it is operating. The switch is right underneath the shaft for the 3-pt. drop rate adjustment knob. The yellow wire on this switch is the one you want, and I tapped into it right next to the switch. This is wire #564 in the 1025R’s wiring harness, and that number is imprinted periodically on the wire’s insulation. I used a waterproof in-line splice to make the connection. A 12 volt automotive relay must be used to isolate this circuit, and a TVS diode must be used to protect the switch’s contacts. Please see the first post in this thread for a detailed schematic.

bkuplts1.jpg

bkuplts2.jpg

bkuplts3.jpg


The still photos below attempt to show the light output of the backup lights and work lights when facing to the rear:

bkuplts4.jpg

bkuplts5.jpg

bkuplts6.jpg

bkuplts7.jpg
 

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I thought I was a "Type A" until I saw Keane's electrical schematic. Holy cow........Very well done, Keane. Very well done.

I have strobes which are very similar to add to the sides of my cab roof. In fact, I think they are the same strobes based upon the photo you posted. I have the harness all ready and as soon as I finish this lawn "job" I have been occupied with, then I plan to add them to the sides of the cab roof. The lights have a key fob which can change the flashing sequence and I believe even the color of the lights. They are very bright for sure. I was concerned in my earlier testing the flashing lights were going to be disruptive to the image on the camera but that's not the case.

My concerns were the same, when you are crossing the road or even plowing snow into the driveway at a 90 degree angle to the road, the visibility is not very good. The strobes will help immensely.

The backup monitor is simply amazing. I have found with mine, that even when I back into the garage with no rear lights on the tractor and when the garage is pitch black, the image on the camera is as if it's daylight in the garage. The camera is very, very handy and in fact, I can even tip the camera down slightly by hand and see the 3 point hitch well enough to be able to connect to it without ever turning around. It sure beats sitting on the seat sideways looking over my shoulder to hook up implements.

Normally, I keep the camera aimed a little higher up than where I can see the hitch. One of the best benefits of the camera is when plowing snow, you can see the vehicles coming up on you, especially when its dark, as the lights are very obvious in the camera before they are as noticeable in the side mirrors. I bet I watch the camera nearly as much as I watch out the windshield when plowing snow. Between the wide view in the monitor and the images in the side mirrors, there is no need to turn around.

No doubt, the technology can really enhance the usefulness and safety of using these machines.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Back up lights definitely look brighter that the work lights.
The location I picked for the photos was not ideal. The work lights are higher on the tractor and are aimed higher, so they're hitting the trees and you can't see how far they project. The backup lights are going below the tree limbs for the most part, so their effect is more visible. If we get a warm night here at some point, I may try this again in a different location. With one set of lights high and the other low, the coverage behind the tractor is really pretty good.

At the time I did this shoot, we had just had a major snow storm. The best locations for this kind of demo are off my driveway, but I didn't want to deal with the clay mud.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
Switches below dash area and wiring center

To control the strobe lights, I added a switch and a push button in the recessed area below the dash. The switch applies power to the strobes. The push button changes the flashing pattern. The LED strobes that I purchased have about 20 different patterns available, including solid "ON" for use as a marker light. Each time the button is pushed, the lights sequentially change to a new flashing pattern.
I already was using the existing switch cut-out in this area for control of the linear actuator on my snow blower chute, so I had to add holes for both new switches. The right side of this recessed area is worthless for adding recessed switches. The internal structure of the tractor encroaches on this area. You might be able to use surface-mounted switches that only had wiring going through to the back side.

SCSwitch1.jpg


The switch is back-lighted with LED's. The identifiers on the switches are lighted whenever the tractor's key switch is in the ON position. Turning the switch "ON" also turns on the second backlight LED.

SCswitch2.jpg


The push button was very easy. Need a round hole, use a round drill bit. I use brad point bits on plastic to prevent the bit from wandering. Slow speed drilling is best.

A rectangle is more of a challenge. I create a drawing of the hole I want on the computer and cut it out. I make the hole slightly smaller than I need it, planning to file it a bit for a perfect fit. Plastic is easy to file. I carefully place the template where I want it and make sure it's straight. Then I carefully mark the 4 corners with an awl. After removing the template, I use a scribe to connect the marks. Then I drill 2 holes in opposite corners, keeping the holes within the marked rectangle. From there I use a keyhole saw and a file to perfect the opening. Before I start with the cutting tools, I put painter's tape around the opening to protect against scratches.

SCswitch3.jpg

When I started testing the video system, I discovered that I needed a special power switch for maintenance. This 3 position switch is normally in the "Operating" position which has the cameras and monitor connected to switched power. This means they come on when the tractor is running. The middle position on this switch shuts off all power. And the final position connects to the "always" ON power. This way I can adjust or test the video system without the engine running. Since this switch is for maintenance only, it is hidden. It is waterproof and it is mounted on the firewall between the engine and the dash area. I can reach my hand underneath the left-side engine panel and operate this switch.

SCswitch4.jpg


SCswitch6.jpg


SCswitch5.jpg


An amended schematic diagram with the additional switch is attached. The change is highlighted with a yellow circle.
 

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Great example of what happens when you have the time and ability to execute a SIMPLE improvement. Sure is better than having a redneck solution like a flashlight duct taped to the ROPS.

Is your next project a tractor remotely controlled? You could sit at the kitchen table eating breakfast and watch the tractor plowing snow or cutting the grass. I’m sure this could be done if cost was no object. You obviously have great technical abilities. Great job!
 
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