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Hey Gang, doin' some noodling, and being I have a 55 gal sprayer I apply lawn weed killer with, was wondering if anyone applys liquid fertilizer to their lawn? I am under the impression it is more of an instant gratification rather than a time release thing. I do tend to like the time release action of granular fertilizer if this is true. I am also thinking that the broadcast of granular is more efficent to apply. Fill me in on the pros and cons of both. Can you enlighten me with your knowledge. It would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I have heard the same thing "fast acting and short lasting" so I never bothered trying it.
 

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The farmer that cuts our hay fields has them sprayed with a liquid fertilizer each spring. It really pops the grass to a green color and gives it a boost. He does not spray after the spring cutting, so the fall harvest is less robust. Consistent with the "works fast don't last" observations.

Pete
 

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We use liquid fertilizer all the time. I do not use it on the lawn as its not cheap and does not last as long since you cut your lawn. The liquid works great on trees or on vegetables. If any plant get burned by heat or by spray the liquid fertilizer will really help.

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Any update on this topic? Do the old axioms (fast, but does not last, more expensive) still hold for using liquid fertilizer over granular?

I'm getting ready to buy a big sprayer or spreader for a half acre garden, acre of woods and an acre lawn.
 

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I throw in a hand full of Miracle Grow crystals when I spray the lawn for weeds in the spring. I back that up with granular fertilizer. It kick starts the lawn until the granules become active.

If you want a quick hit to super-green the lawn, use Ironite. Follow the directions or it will over-darken. Also stay away from concrete, drives, etc. it will rust stain. Incredible stuff though.
 

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Randy,

The amount of Nitrogen absorbed immediately gives the flush of deep green, the rest pretty much soaks into the ground, and remains on tap for root uptake, same as the granular does. The difference is less loss of N, and you are limited to how much can be applied without burning things.

Hit the local Ag supply shop, and pick up a bag of water soluble 20-20-20. 25lb bags run around 40 bucks.
Figure lawn area, and just mix in a shot when you run the lawn sprayer. It lowers Tank mix PH, and increases uptake by the weeds.

If you don't want to run the sprayer and give the lawn a boost, just put an inline injector on the garden hose and run the stuff through the sprinkler.

Take the nozzle off, and just place inline with a short length of hose. :thumbup1gif:

http://www.amazon.com/Aqua-Plumb-Sp...&sr=8-25&keywords=hose+end+fertilizer+sprayer
 

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The places like Southern States that supply the really large farmers usually have liquid Nitrogen fertilizer (30-0-0) in bulk tanks. It is really inexpensive. Keep in mind that they fill tanker trucks and usually have a 2 inch hose so they can't fill most small containers.
I find it works really well if you like to mow. I apply it in the early spring for cool season grasses like fescue or bluegrass. Those go semi-dormant when it gets really hot so later applications do little good. Another application in the fall would be good. The liquid is really cheap and easy to apply.
It is not inexpensive if purchased in gallon containers from places like TSC.
 

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Liquid N

The places like Southern States that supply the really large farmers usually have liquid Nitrogen fertilizer (30-0-0) in bulk tanks. It is really inexpensive. Keep in mind that they fill tanker trucks and usually have a 2 inch hose so they can't fill most small containers.
I find it works really well if you like to mow. I apply it in the early spring for cool season grasses like fescue or bluegrass. Those go semi-dormant when it gets really hot so later applications do little good. Another application in the fall would be good. The liquid is really cheap and easy to apply.
It is not inexpensive if purchased in gallon containers from places like TSC.
Liquid N is widely used in the south and you are correct, farm suppliers usually have large pumps and hoses to move it. If you are going to use it on a lawn, consider diluting it with water as full strength will likely burn the grass. It will grow out of the burn but dilution will remove that risk.

It's also pretty corrosive. Keep it away from vehicles, aluminum trim on your house, sheds etc. I would recommend also using protective gear, especially eye protection. While not nearly as dangerous as anhydrous nitrogen, it's still not something to use casually.

Please, before applying any fertilizer get a soil test. If the PH is off, the fertilizer is largely wasted and will simply run off or filter into the ground water. Nitrogen is highly water soluble and the extra simply becomes pollution. While relatively inexpensive to apply at lawn scale, the result in streams and rivers is very, very expensive to offset. Many of the farmers in this area soil sample yearly, some before each crop and match fertilizer applications specifically to the crop and the rainfall experienced that year.

Treefarmer
 

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