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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks,

I'm new to the forum and hydraulics.. I've got a 3020 with a 48 loader that had a couple of bad hydraulic lines (flex lines on each end of the tubing that runs from the bucket tilt control valve down). I have them removed and they're at a local shop being re-made.

i've never had to do this, so I want to verify a couple of things.

Both lines need to have threads cleaned and prepped with liquid thread-sealer, correct?
Once both lines are on, do I need to bleed the system? Basically the line with a 90 off the control valve and then the line from the tubing to the bottom of the bucket ram, so, when I replace the lines, there will be that whole length that could have air in it.

I did find a procedure for bleeding where you turn the wheels to the right, bleed and then repeat until the air is all out; I think that requires removing the cowl.

Is there anything else I'm not thinking of that I should know?

I expect I'll be replacing all the flex lines in the coming months. The one on the ram appears to have been seeping for a while; but the one up by the control valve was actively dribbling after some work with the loader this past weekend.

Thanks,

BJ
 

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I had to replace a line on the loader of my 4066R last summer that blew out. I never did any of the things you mentioned. I just went to O'Reillys and had them make me a new line like the one I took with me. Put it on and went back to work. The air will work it's way out of the cylinders as you use the loader.

Dave
 

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Welcome from Preston County, West Virginia

:wgtt:

Had to replace a line on the BH , had a new line made at local hyd shop put the line on started the tractor checked for leaks , done.
 

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Welcome to GTT,
The system is self bleeding, and whether or not you need sealant depends on the fitting type, only NPT "pipe threads" technically needs it, and they were rarely used on JD tractors.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. It wasn't clear to me that I had to do anything special.. other than replace the lines and move on. I just put 'em on and all is well

I suspect I'll be replacing all of these lines sooner rather than later. I probably should have pulled them all to save me the trouble when winter hits.

BJ
 

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Agree with others. Hydraulics that are connected to cylinders or motors are self bleeding. Essentially this means, after replacing a line or rebuilding a cylinder, if you cycle the cylinder several times, the air will purge through the system.
So, to say these systems are "self bleeding" is accurate if you cycle the cylinder several times to purge the air through the system. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Agree with others. Hydraulics that are connected to cylinders or motors are self bleeding. Essentially this means, after replacing a line or rebuilding a cylinder, if you cycle the cylinder several times, the air will purge through the system.
So, to say these systems are "self bleeding" is accurate if you cycle the cylinder several times to purge the air through the system. :good2:

Thanks folks. Had it out today and after some hesitation a few cycles of the loader and all was well. Nice to hot have all that oil dribbling around, heh.

BJ
 
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