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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks JimR.

So....is the general consensus of the SCUT posters on this forum that the quick hitch plow is superior to the loader mounted version(s)? Or is it still more like Pepsi/Coke preference? :flag_of_truce: From reading thru the myriad of posts on loader or frame mounted plows....there seems to be some issues with the engineering/geometry of the loader mounted variety that seem to favour using the frame mounts.
 

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Thanks JimR.

So....is the general consensus of the SCUT posters on this forum that the quick hitch plow is superior to the loader mounted version(s)? Or is it still more like Pepsi/Coke preference? :flag_of_truce: From reading thru the myriad of posts on loader or frame mounted plows....there seems to be some issues with the engineering/geometry of the loader mounted variety that seem to favour using the frame mounts.
I don't know if there is a consensus. I've seen a lot of comments from people worried about bending their loader arms but I've never heard anyone say it's actually ever happened. I have a 2-series which is only marginally larger than the SCUTs and once I mounted my plow on the loader I never looked back. I don't even remember how to hook it up using just the Quick Hitch. :laugh:
 

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Thanks JimR.

So....is the general consensus of the SCUT posters on this forum that the quick hitch plow is superior to the loader mounted version(s)? Or is it still more like Pepsi/Coke preference? From reading thru the myriad of posts on loader or frame mounted plows....there seems to be some issues with the engineering/geometry of the loader mounted variety that seem to favour using the frame mounts.
I'm not aware of that consensus. Especially when you consider that the current JD Quick Attach front mounted 54" plow is basically a carry over from their garden tractors and uses a tractor mount designed for a mower deck. The Quick Attach is barely up to the task of carrying the snow blower let alone a blade that will see a lot of force put on the edges.

Pushing snow with the loader isn't much different than ramming the bucket into a pile of gravel or using the edge of the bucket to loosen a stump.

If longevity is the concern I'd take the loader mounted blade any day.
 

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I don't know if there is a consensus. I've seen a lot of comments from people worried about bending their loader arms but I've never heard anyone say it's actually ever happened. I have a 2-series which is only marginally larger than the SCUTs and once I mounted my plow on the loader I never looked back. I don't even remember how to hook it up using just the Quick Hitch. :laugh:
Jim, I’ll be using a FEL mounted plow for the first time this year. That would be my only concern, when angled one loader arm would be taking on more pressure correct??


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If you think of a Plow for your FEL<, CTA is starting to manufacturing them. I am thinking of getting one of these for my new 2038. Good Luck
 
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Jim, I’ll be using a FEL mounted plow for the first time this year. That would be my only concern, when angled one loader arm would be taking on more pressure correct??
Not necessarily. I have the 54" Deere plow mounted on the Artillian adapter. All of the stress of the plow is on the Quick Hitch part that is still used.. That is centered on the Artillian adapter that is mounted on the Artillian fork frame. I'll have to post a pic later of the whole setup but by the time everything is mounted, the pressure form the plow is pretty evenly distributed between the frame arms. The Quick Hitch is really the weak point. I popped the angling hydro cylinder last year when I inadvertently slammed the plow into some solid stuff.
 

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Not necessarily. I have the 54" Deere plow mounted on the Artillian adapter. All of the stress of the plow is on the Quick Hitch part that is still used.. That is centered on the Artillian adapter that is mounted on the Artillian fork frame. I'll have to post a pic later of the whole setup but by the time everything is mounted, the pressure form the plow is pretty evenly distributed between the frame arms. The Quick Hitch is really the weak point. I popped the angling hydro cylinder last year when I inadvertently slammed the plow into some solid stuff.
Okay, I’m not using the Artillian set up, but I do understand what you are saying.

This is mine, it’s a 72” Moose UTV plow.


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Not necessarily. I have the 54" Deere plow mounted on the Artillian adapter. All of the stress of the plow is on the Quick Hitch part that is still used.. That is centered on the Artillian adapter that is mounted on the Artillian fork frame. I'll have to post a pic later of the whole setup but by the time everything is mounted, the pressure form the plow is pretty evenly distributed between the frame arms. The Quick Hitch is really the weak point. I popped the angling hydro cylinder last year when I inadvertently slammed the plow into some solid stuff.
Here is the link to my setup. I have never had any problems. Been using this setup for two years and have pushed some pretty heavy and hard snow.

http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/artillian-tractor/29521-artillian-forks-plow-adapter.html
 

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Hiya,

Loader plows for snow are an idea that works better on paper than it does in the real world. Don't get me wrong, they work but there aren't the best choice unless you have the perfect area to use them. I had a 5' Curtis loader plow on a 2520 about 10 years ago.
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Here are my points to consider:

1) You plowing area needs to be flat. As the plow sticks out a lot further than a bucket edge, the geometry of the loader and it's mount are critical if you have slopes. What happens is that going downhill you need to raise the loader and then curl the plow down to maintain the edge angle but when going uphill, you need to drop the arms and curl the plow up however, the Deere loader don't have enough of a roll back and the leading edge of the edge when the plow is angled takes all the wear.

2) Forget about using your loader float function. The weight of the snow will push loader if it's in float and the front wheels of the tractor will lift off the ground. If you have ballast on the rear for traction, this will only make the wheels lift easier. You can overcome this by lifting the loader slightly but now your not scraping down to bare pavement. Going uphill makes this even worse.

3) In reference to #2, you will not be able to steer with your front wheels and the plow will steer for you. That long mount and the angled blade with snow will overpower your front wheels and they will slide. If you have steering brakes these will help but it's a pita on long runs.

4) The snow will not "roll off" the blade like it does on a plow truck. Think about it, your going about 1 to 2 MPH with your tractor, the snow will roll over and slowly make it's way to the trailing edge of the plow where it will plop over, many times rolling back right in front of your tires. In order to have it roll off the blade you have to be going about 10 to 12 MPH, that is not easily done on a small tractor.

5) The plow weighs a lot and it sticks out a lot. Because of these 2 factors, you loader can't lift a lot of snow to create high banks. I had a 200cx and the plow weighed about 450 lbs and stuck out close to 2-1/2 feet from the mount pads. To the loader it must have felt like about 700 Lbs as I could take only small bites of snow when I banked the piles or else it would stall the loader.

6) You need a good amount of space to pile the snow and you need to push it all the way back from the start of the season otherwise you will run out of space to put it. Ask me, I know all too well about this.

If you get a little bit of snow or the snow at your place tends to melt between storms, get a snow pusher, they are easier to work with than a loader plow. If your area is like mine (I live on a mountain in ski country) where once it snows, it's there until the spring, get a snow blower. They will throw the snow 50 to 70 feet away and although they do move slower, you only need to cover the area you want cleared, not 50 feet on each side to store the pushed snow.

My 2 cents,
Tom
 

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Loader plows for snow are an idea that works better on paper than it does in the real world. Don't get me wrong, they work but there aren't the best choice unless you have the perfect area to use them. I had a 5' Curtis loader plow on a 2520 about 10 years ago.

2) Forget about using your loader float function. The weight of the snow will push loader if it's in float and the front wheels of the tractor will lift off the ground. If you have ballast on the rear for traction, this will only make the wheels lift easier. You can overcome this by lifting the loader slightly but now your not scraping down to bare pavement. Going uphill makes this even worse.
Excellent post! The issue with the loader lifting the wheels off the ground when in float is a common problem with all of the small lightweight SCUT/CUT tractors. They just don't have enough weight on the front axle to keep the front end planted. Larger heavier tractors don't seem to have this problem.
 

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Excellent post! The issue with the loader lifting the wheels off the ground when in float is a common problem with all of the small lightweight SCUT/CUT tractors. They just don't have enough weight on the front axle to keep the front end planted. Larger heavier tractors don't seem to have this problem.
So just trying to learn here because this will be my first winter with a FEL plow, maybe I should be a few suitcase weights on the front?
 
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Hiya,
Loader plows for snow are an idea that works better on paper than it does in the real world. Don't get me wrong, they work but there aren't the best choice unless you have the perfect area to use them. I had a 5' Curtis loader plow on a 2520 about 10 years ago.
Great post. :thumbup1gif: I made the PERFECT setup on paper many years ago. So I made it, twice. Didn't work well enough for me and was more of a PITA than useful. I even tried telling myself it actually works well. I gave up on it.
 

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Great post. :thumbup1gif: I made the PERFECT setup on paper many years ago. So I made it, twice. Didn't work well enough for me and was more of a PITA than useful. I even tried telling myself it actually works well. I gave up on it.
At least you tried, that says a lot about a man :lol:
 
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Sure. Bring cash and/or beer.
Well that's a load off, I was thinking Crown, but if you'd prefer cheap beer instead :bigthumb:
 
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