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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1025r that I want to load on trailer. It seems I cannot load the tractor on with anything on the 3 point I may have to drive max 30 mi on county roads. I want to haul.
bucket
forks
ballast box

My trailer tilts so that helps. Wondering if I took another set of ramps to get on ramp of trailer then trailer would that work? I would be at max of weight of trailer with all three attachments plus tractor. Plus if I back on I believe I will exceed tongue weight.

I am not above making two trips but how do I get ballast box on? Put it on first with forks? Then back tractor on? I will practice when weather warms up just looking for some tips.

Im sure Sully and Ken could weigh in here as they trailer a lot. This is the trailer I have so trying to make it work

Thanks
781267
 

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You don't want to put the ballast box on with the forks because then you'd have no ballast on the machine. No good especially when working on an incline with movement.
 
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Well, your first problem is that you do not have brakes on your trailer. At least, I assume you do not have brakes as I have not seen a single axle trailer with brakes. Nice trailer, but without brakes, you are not properly protecting your investment in your tractor. I hauled my 1025R once, tractor only, before I realized my problem and immediately upgraded to a 20ft aluminum trailer with brakes. Then after getting my 4066R, I upgraded to a 31ft gooseneck trailer. NO more trailers.

That being said, have you considered hauling the extra items in the bed of the pickup?

Dave
 

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I would think a couple 3-4 sticks of dunnage should get you on.
 
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Haul the bucket or forks in the bed of the truck.
 

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2019 1025r
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Discussion Starter #6
Haul the bucket or forks in the bed of the truck.
Yes that’s what I thinking after reading this. Put something in back of truck. Will practice that also. I do have a topper so that will make it really interesting. Like I said looking for so tips. If I cant do it safe I won’t do it.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
I would think a couple 3-4 sticks of dunnage should get you on.
So like build the ramp to the ramp? Never use dunnage before
 
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Yup. Look at the point wheee your box bottoms out and where the rear tires are needs to be higher. Sometimes a couple 2x’s will suffice. Doesn’t look like you need much
 
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Measuring my1025R tractor from 42 inch fork tips to ballast box hung on its imatch is a total length of 17"4".

It looks like that is a Floe trailer; which model is it? It may be the picture angle, but the deck length looks several feet too short to get the package of forks holding the detached bucket, tractor, plus ballast box on and be able to close the ramp. Maybe resting the forks on the front trailer rail would allow you to squeeze on, but I would think that configuration might end up with negative tongue weight.

What trailer dimensions are you working with? And, since your trailer looks pretty new, is it too late to trade it back in for one of their tandem axle models? :) It would raise your safety factor considerably.

Two trips gets you into a similar situation to the riddle about the getting a fox, chicken, and grain across a river in a boat that can hold only 2 at a trip. You may have to take the tractor and ballast box first, leave the ballast box, and haul the tractor back to be able to pick up the forks and bucket. Unless there is a way to haul the bucket and forks in the truck bed. But that would mean unhooking the trailer on arrival to get access to unload them over the truck tailgate.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Measuring my1025R tractor from 42 inch fork tips to ballast box hung on its imatch is a total length of 17"4".

It looks like that is a Floe trailer; which model is it? It may be the picture angle, but the deck length looks several feet too short to get the package of forks holding the detached bucket, tractor, plus ballast box on and be able to close the ramp. Maybe resting the forks on the front trailer rail would allow you to squeeze on, but I would think that configuration might end up with negative tongue weight.

What trailer dimensions are you working with? And, since your trailer looks pretty new, is it too late to trade it back in for one of their tandem axle models? :) It would raise your safety factor considerably.

Two trips gets you into a similar situation to the riddle about the getting a fox, chicken, and grain across a river in a boat that can hold only 2 at a trip. You may have to take the tractor and ballast box first, leave the ballast box, and haul the tractor back to be able to pick up the forks and bucket. Unless there is a way to haul the bucket and forks in the truck bed. But that would mean unhooking the trailer on arrival to get access to unload them over the truck tailgate.
Measuring my1025R tractor from 42 inch fork tips to ballast box hung on its imatch is a total length of 17"4".

It looks like that is a Floe trailer; which model is it? It may be the picture angle, but the deck length looks several feet too short to get the package of forks holding the detached bucket, tractor, plus ballast box on and be able to close the ramp. Maybe resting the forks on the front trailer rail would allow you to squeeze on, but I would think that configuration might end up with negative tongue weight.

What trailer dimensions are you working with? And, since your trailer looks pretty new, is it too late to trade it back in for one of their tandem axle models? :) It would raise your safety factor considerably.

Two trips gets you into a similar situation to the riddle about the getting a fox, chicken, and grain across a river in a boat that can hold only 2 at a trip. You may have to take the tractor and ballast box first, leave the ballast box, and haul the tractor back to be able to pick up the forks and bucket. Unless there is a way to haul the bucket and forks in the truck bed. But that would mean unhooking the trailer on arrival to get access to unload them over the truck tailgate.
14.5x79w
 
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Just something to remember, the owners manual says to load the tractor in reverse or you need to tie down the hood. Apparently the hood latch isn’t very strong on these tractors. When I moved my 1025r I put the bucket in the back of my truck. I didn’t have a ballast box at the time but my trailer is a 6’x10’ and I know I can fit the box beside the tractor on the trailer to make it fit
 

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Well, your first problem is that you do not have brakes on your trailer. At least, I assume you do not have brakes as I have not seen a single axle trailer with brakes. Nice trailer, but without brakes, you are not properly protecting your investment in your tractor. I hauled my 1025R once, tractor only, before I realized my problem and immediately upgraded to a 20ft aluminum trailer with brakes. Then after getting my 4066R, I upgraded to a 31ft gooseneck trailer. NO more trailers.

That being said, have you considered hauling the extra items in the bed of the pickup?

Dave
Plenty of single axle trailers have brakes. I have a single 5000lb axle from an old Airstream trailer with electric brakes that's under the trailer zi use to haul my 1025R and anything else that'll fit (trash, pipe, lumber, etc) and a single axle boat trailer with surge brakes. Neither are custom axles.
 
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Well, your first problem is that you do not have brakes on your trailer. At least, I assume you do not have brakes as I have not seen a single axle trailer with brakes. Nice trailer, but without brakes, you are not properly protecting your investment in your tractor. I hauled my 1025R once, tractor only, before I realized my problem and immediately upgraded to a 20ft aluminum trailer with brakes. Then after getting my 4066R, I upgraded to a 31ft gooseneck trailer. NO more trailers.

That being said, have you considered hauling the extra items in the bed of the pickup?

Dave
Big trucks/trailers are nice but some of us simply don't have big tow rigs or storage for huge trailers.

Also, in my (communist) state we need state inspection on all trailers >3500 GAWR or with brakes. Just one more subtle annoyance.

In my case the topography of the land precludes me from long trailers since I can't get them on and off of the property due to the steepness.

So we're stuck with single axles for local stuff or renting bigger and loading it down on the flats if we need to move it further.
 
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Well, your first problem is that you do not have brakes on your trailer. At least, I assume you do not have brakes as I have not seen a single axle trailer with brakes. Nice trailer, but without brakes, you are not properly protecting your investment in your tractor. I hauled my 1025R once, tractor only, before I realized my problem and immediately upgraded to a 20ft aluminum trailer with brakes. Then after getting my 4066R, I upgraded to a 31ft gooseneck trailer. NO more trailers.

That being said, have you considered hauling the extra items in the bed of the pickup?
Dave
There is no way looking at that picture of the trailer that one can say whether it has brakes. If I saw the 4 wire connector plugged in that truck, then it doesn't have brakes. I have a smaller tractor that I haul in a 12 foot box trailer. I added electric brakes to this trailer and test them every time I use it. Now my unit only weighs 1600 lbs and about 1200 for the trailer but I wouldn't haul my tractor without trailer brake as I have felt the push when I under estimated my braking distance.

With that said, his first priority should be getting brakes put on it. It isn't a hard job, just first check to see if you have the plate welded on the axle to mount the backing plate.
 

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Plenty of single axle trailers have brakes. I have a single 5000lb axle from an old Airstream trailer with electric brakes that's under the trailer zi use to haul my 1025R and anything else that'll fit (trash, pipe, lumber, etc) and a single axle boat trailer with surge brakes. Neither are custom axles.
Check out new trailers with single axles. All are rated at 3500# or less and do not have brakes. Brakes are not required until the GVWR exceeds 3500# You likely have a shop built trailer with a single axle of a pair of axles from an old Airstream. They may have made single axle trailers, but I don't remember any. I have never seen a factory built single axle trailer with brakes. I suppose it is possible to have a shop built or factory custom single axle trailer with brakes, but the cost increase on the factory built trailer could probably put you very close to a tandem with brakes. I hauled my 1025R with no attachments one time, before I ditched the single axle trailer with no brakes and moved up to a 20 ft tandem trailer with brakes. Back in the day, a lot of tandem trailers were built with brakes on one axle only and a lot of them were built with no brakes at all. I stopped and looked at a tandem when I was in town recently. A 16ft with no brakes. Not interested. I have been looking around for a small tandem trailer so I don't have to drag that 31ft gooseneck everywhere, but it has to have brakes on both axles. I see an occasional shop built trailer listed on CraigsList made with tandem mobile home axles, but I don't think they have brakes. At least, I have not seen one listed with brakes. I used to see a lot more of those.

Protecting my investment is of the utmost importance. I took advantage of the JD 0% finance when I bought my 1025R. I sure would not have liked having to still make those payments with no tractor due to a crash. BTW, the trailer weighed 1500# and the tractor also weighed 1500#, so I was already pushing the 3500# GVWR of the trailer.

Dave
 

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Check out new trailers with single axles. All are rated at 3500# or less and do not have brakes. Brakes are not required until the GVWR exceeds 3500# You likely have a shop built trailer with a single axle of a pair of axles from an old Airstream. They may have made single axle trailers, but I don't remember any. I have never seen a factory built single axle trailer with brakes. I suppose it is possible to have a shop built or factory custom single axle trailer with brakes, but the cost increase on the factory built trailer could probably put you very close to a tandem with brakes. I hauled my 1025R with no attachments one time, before I ditched the single axle trailer with no brakes and moved up to a 20 ft tandem trailer with brakes. Back in the day, a lot of tandem trailers were built with brakes on one axle only and a lot of them were built with no brakes at all. I stopped and looked at a tandem when I was in town recently. A 16ft with no brakes. Not interested. I have been looking around for a small tandem trailer so I don't have to drag that 31ft gooseneck everywhere, but it has to have brakes on both axles. I see an occasional shop built trailer listed on CraigsList made with tandem mobile home axles, but I don't think they have brakes. At least, I have not seen one listed with brakes. I used to see a lot more of those.

Protecting my investment is of the utmost importance. I took advantage of the JD 0% finance when I bought my 1025R. I sure would not have liked having to still make those payments with no tractor due to a crash. BTW, the trailer weighed 1500# and the tractor also weighed 1500#, so I was already pushing the 3500# GVWR of the trailer.

Dave
Just curious if you had a loader on in that situation? A 1025r is around 1500 lbs, add 500 lbs for a loader and bucket, possible liquid ballast in rear tires? And a ballast box is usually around 500 lbs
 

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Just curious if you had a loader on in that situation? A 1025r is around 1500 lbs, add 500 lbs for a loader and bucket, possible liquid ballast in rear tires? And a ballast box is usually around 500 lbs
Tractor only. No attachments or implements. It barely fit on a 10ft trailer.

Dave
 

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Next question - are the sides of the trailer easily removable, like just inserted into stake pockets? If no, don’t waste your time reading any further. (just answered my own question by going to the Floe trailer website. Sides are easily removable for side loading)

If yes, use the forks to load the ballast box from the side at the front of the trailer, leaving the box in a corner. Pick up the bucket with the forks and back on off-center so the rear wheels clear the ballast box. The 79” wide trailer has enough width for the tractor and 2’ of ballast box side-by-side. If you can’t close the ramp due to the forks, take the tines off of the frame, and put the tines on the trailer deck separately, or in the back of the truck.

You should be able to safely lift the ballast box without undue stress time on the tractor front axle.

No rule about having the load centered side to side. If there were, I couldn’t tow my two horse trailer with just one horse in it.
 

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Dave (DDINHam) is likely correct about the trailer not having brakes. In my days owning the trailer dealership business, not a single single axle trailer ever had brakes that crossed our lot and we bought them by the dozen quantity per size, so it was not unusual to have 50 to 80 single axle utility trailers in stock at a time.

Also, many new trailers are now using a 2,500 lb axle to keep the price down. While most of the 2,500 lb axles are used on small tandem axle trailers, I have seen some single axles with the 2,500 lb axles to make the price point as low as possible.

To Fishpike, I need some more information to give you a good answer. For example,

1. Are you using the rear bumper as the hitch with a ball in the bumper hole, or does the truck have a 2" receiver style class 3/4 hitch mounted on the truck frame under the bumper? I can't tell from the photo. A photo of the actual hitch would be very helpful..........

2. Is the hitch ball 2" or 2 5/16" in size?

3. Can you take a picture of the 3ph location with the ballast box on in the full raised position as you are trying to load the tractor either by driving on or backing on the trailer? It doesn't seem like you have too much of an angle for the 3ph to clear from what little I can see in the photo.

4. Does the trailer have a 4 pin light connector or the round 7 pin plug on it?

5. What size tires are on the trailer?

6. I would assume the trailer is a gravity tilt, correct, instead of a hydraulic tilt bed? In other words, as you drive on the deck with the tractor, the trailer should tilt down level and flat once the weight moves forward, correct?

If you can provide this, I can answer with more specific information for you.
 
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