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Well, the time has come for my horses to get a loafing shed. After looking at all the various options, I decided to just build it myself. I ordered the materials kit from Sutherland's yesterday. For those of you who don't have a Sutherland's store around, boy are you missing out. :laugh: It's like a Home Depot and Tractor Supply all rolled into one store, but with a whole lot more hunting stuff. They don't sell guns, but had everything else related to hunting, including gun safes and a massive ammo counter.

They sell material kits for everything from a little garden shed up to massive pole barns. The 13x36 loafing shed kit is a standard item, but they reworked it and got it down to 24'. The gentleman warned me that the blueprints would be a little off, because they were for a 36' version and I would have to modify the pole spacing. No big deal though.

The kit was ordered yesterday, and they said all we were waiting on would be the metal which is due in early next week. Since my tractor, trailer, and practically all my other equipment is over 1,000 miles away still I plan on having them deliver it, hopefully late next week or next weekend. In the mean time I'm working through the prints to figure out the pole spacing, then I get to go lay it all out with string and start digging post holes. Did I mention the tractor is 1,000 miles away? :lol: 4' deep holes, 12" in diameter. I'm glad it's been raining here for the last week or so, at least the ground isn't as rock hard as usual this time of year. :munch:
 

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Chief Stick-picker-upper
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Loafing Shed. :good2: Don't forget the pics, during & after.
Do they make Slacking Sheds. If so, I know of one guy who may want one. :lolol:

Just saying. :dunno:
 

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Reminds me of when I built my pole barn some 25 years ago. I wanted a 24' x 36' and found a store with a kit for that size but I didn't like the metal they used so looked elsewhere. Found one I liked but the closest size they had was 24' x 39'. But due to where I wanted to put it I just couldn't fit in the 39' length. Also of course it cost more.

So I talked to the guy about it and he said he would work it out so that his price would be the same per square foot as the other, so I could buy his kit and cut it down to the size I wanted and then bring back the material I didn't use for a refund, and would come out with the same price as the other building.

Sounded good so that's what I did, only thing was the kit came with 14' lumber for 13' stalls, I had to cut the lumber down for my 12' stalls, so I wound up with no lumber that could be returned. :banghead::laugh::lol:

So it cost me more than the first kit but it was better material so I can't complain, it has been a good one, still have it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
We always called them run in sheds, loafing shed is sort of a new term for me as well. Guess I could call it the Gizmo shed. :lol: The last one I built didn't come in kit form, I just drew up a material list and bought it. The "kit" is the exact same price as just buying the materials in non kit form, and it comes with drawings. Saves me a little work doing that stuff, and it's all designed for this area and the wind/ snow loads.

Right now the only pictures could be "before" photos, but as it takes shape I'll try and snap a few. I'm hoping to have the material sometime close to the 21st, so we have some time left to go.
 

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Mine was called a pole barn at the time by the seller, some people called them loafing sheds. It was open on one side. I wasn't using it for livestock but for equipment storage, the first time it came a big rainstorm it blew water in all the way across it and everything inside got soaked. So I wound up building doors for it making it totally enclosed.
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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I think of a loafing shed as smaller than a pole barn.

Welcome to being farther west, 56Ford!! I think you will find a lot of differences in terminology, as you go along. Do they have stock tanks in WY, or just ponds? :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think of a loafing shed as smaller than a pole barn.

Welcome to being farther west, 56Ford!! I think you will find a lot of differences in terminology, as you go along. Do they have stock tanks in WY, or just ponds? :laugh:
Lots of things are different here. Haven't asked about tanks and ponds, but tire tanks are popular. Since coal mining is such a huge industry here, there are a few places that buy the worn out mining tires (about 8' tall and 3' wide). They cut one sidewall off, then sell them as water tanks. They sell the cut off sidewalls as fence material. Dig a trench, set the sidewalls in it and overlap them, and it actually works pretty well for corrals. The other half that is used as a tank is laid down flat, then a layer of concrete put in the bottom. Pretty popular out here for livestock.
 

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Are you just going to hobble them and let them free range:mocking:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was looking for the dirt mounds from digging the post holes, but I couldn't see any.:dunno: at least the horses has a shelter-huh! big jim
Hey, that's the before picture. There's a mowed spot. :laugh:

Are you just going to hobble them and let them free range:mocking:
"And his dreams of tomorrow, surrounded by fences. But he'll dream tonight of when fences weren't here..." :good2:

No hobbles or free ranging, just supper time.
 

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It's flat!!:unknown: No trees.:dunno: It's flat.:unknown:

Nice place 56FordGuy!!

I have my pad ready and no quotes, no builders. Nice weather gets everyone super busy I guess. Been thinking about a kit like yours and getting some help from family and friends. We'll see, I think I'm a little old and limited for the build but, one never knows in a pinch.
 

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And so it begins....
Well, we're getting there. It's going to be a slow beginning. The material arrived Tuesday, and they delivered it this afternoon. I need to lay out and mark for my post holes, then I get to wait some more. This project has been hampered a bit by the lack of equipment; I had to wait on material to be delivered, and now I'm waiting to dig post holes. I have a neighbor that's offered me his tractor and a 6" auger, but he's baling hay with it right now. I need a 12" hole for the 6x6" square posts, so that would still leave me with a lot of manual labor with a digging bar and post hole diggers to widen them out. I just spoke with a fence contractor that I've worked with a bit, the current plan is for him to bring out a skidsteer with a 12" auger but he can't do that until Monday evening.

If I had the tractor here, I could just throw a PHD on it and dig the holes. Having to wait on other folks slows down the process, but as much as I'd like to get rolling I won't complain when people offer to help. Once the holes are dug I plan to get the posts standing in them that night, and hopefully by then I'll have figured out how I'm going to mix the concrete. I had them sit the pallet (20, 80lb bags) of concrete on the back of my truck and I pulled it in the garage to keep it out of the weather. I don't have a concrete mixer and my wheelbarrow, like everything else, is 1,200 miles away. I know back in TN a lot of guys would just dump the dry mix in the hole and let it absorb moisture but I never cared for that method. Out here, even as wet as it's been this year I don't think there's enough moisture for that method to work even if I wanted to try it. Once I get the posts in the ground, the rest should hopefully move fairly quickly.


It's flat!!:unknown: No trees.:dunno: It's flat.:unknown:

Nice place 56FordGuy!!
After my last house in TN, I wasn't about to live on another hill. :laugh: The photos are deceiving, it's actually quite rolling out here. From where I took that photo of the mowed spot, the ground rises nearly 15 feet in elevation in just a few hundred feet of distance. There are places the horses can stand in that field where they're completely out of sight due to the dips and the lay of the land. My front porch is roughly even with the roof of a neighbor's barn just down the road, and the ground rises again by the time it gets to his house which is about the same elevation as mine.

It's flatter than Tennessee, and certainly more open. I certainly don't dislike trees, but I really don't miss them either. There are three small Aspens in the yard that the previous owner planted, that's plenty enough for me. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I have my pad ready and no quotes, no builders. Nice weather gets everyone super busy I guess. Been thinking about a kit like yours and getting some help from family and friends. We'll see, I think I'm a little old and limited for the build but, one never knows in a pinch.

Around here the barn business is booming. When I was getting quotes, the soonest anyone could even start on mine would've been October and they were estimating 4-6 weeks to complete it depending on the weather.

Doing a shed like this isn't super difficult. The most difficult part is laying out the vertical posts and setting them while keeping everything square. Seeing the work you've done building your pad, there's no question you could handle that. :thumbup1gif: This will be the second one I've done this size, and may actually be easier than the one I built in TN since I went with metal siding this time. Mine will be 13' deep, 24' long, 10' high in the front and 8' high in the rear. Once the posts are set, it's a matter of attaching the cross beams and setting the rafters on them, then attaching the purlins and metal. The siding is made of 10' sheets that aren't too bad to handle by yourself, though an extra hand would make it easier. The roofing panels are 14' long, those are a bit more of a job to get placed but certainly doable with two people. The nice thing about this height is I can reach 95% of the work just from standing on the truck bed. I'm planning to work on it in the evenings after work and on the weekends, but once I get all the vertical posts set I think I can wrap the rest up in about a week (5 evenings and one weekend) if the weather and work job schedule cooperate. I think two people that wanted to get it done and didn't have other things interrupting could probably do the whole job in about three days, including squaring and setting the posts.
 

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Bonehead Club Lackey
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Discussion Starter #19
And here I thought the first pic was a post hole digger. Then I seen the material on the truck...Duh. :laugh:

Guess I was just trying to get you ahead of the game. :hide:

Funny, I had another friend I sent that picture to say the exact same thing. :laugh: The machine in the picture is a Donkey brand, it rides around on the back of the truck and loads/ unloads things. If it could dig post holes...well, I wouldn't be posting this right now. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Well, we're getting there. It's going to be a slow beginning. The material arrived Tuesday, and they delivered it this afternoon. I need to lay out and mark for my post holes, then I get to wait some more. This project has been hampered a bit by the lack of equipment; I had to wait on material to be delivered, and now I'm waiting to dig post holes. I have a neighbor that's offered me his tractor and a 6" auger, but he's baling hay with it right now. I need a 12" hole for the 6x6" square posts, so that would still leave me with a lot of manual labor with a digging bar and post hole diggers to widen them out. I just spoke with a fence contractor that I've worked with a bit, the current plan is for him to bring out a skidsteer with a 12" auger but he can't do that until Monday evening.

If I had the tractor here, I could just throw a PHD on it and dig the holes. Having to wait on other folks slows down the process, but as much as I'd like to get rolling I won't complain when people offer to help. Once the holes are dug I plan to get the posts standing in them that night, and hopefully by then I'll have figured out how I'm going to mix the concrete. I had them sit the pallet (20, 80lb bags) of concrete on the back of my truck and I pulled it in the garage to keep it out of the weather. I don't have a concrete mixer and my wheelbarrow, like everything else, is 1,200 miles away. I know back in TN a lot of guys would just dump the dry mix in the hole and let it absorb moisture but I never cared for that method. Out here, even as wet as it's been this year I don't think there's enough moisture for that method to work even if I wanted to try it. Once I get the posts in the ground, the rest should hopefully move fairly quickly.




After my last house in TN, I wasn't about to live on another hill. :laugh: The photos are deceiving, it's actually quite rolling out here. From where I took that photo of the mowed spot, the ground rises nearly 15 feet in elevation in just a few hundred feet of distance. There are places the horses can stand in that field where they're completely out of sight due to the dips and the lay of the land. My front porch is roughly even with the roof of a neighbor's barn just down the road, and the ground rises again by the time it gets to his house which is about the same elevation as mine.

It's flatter than Tennessee, and certainly more open. I certainly don't dislike trees, but I really don't miss them either. There are three small Aspens in the yard that the previous owner planted, that's plenty enough for me.
:good2:
56FordGuy- Just giving you a hard time. Officially an Oregonian after 35+ year, the topography is the first the I notice. (Raised in flat Illinois, SW of Chicago 75 miles just off Rt 66. Coal strip mining area. Really flat! :laugh:)

I'd give 'whatever' for a piece of flat land. Hills and mountains are great for a view, but actual use is always a challenge on the slope. :banghead:

Sounds like it's time for you to 'bite the bullet' and make that weekend drive to TN. TN, a beautiful state, similar to many areas in Oregon. Gentle rolling hills, green grass and trees. (My brother lived in Knoxville for years so we made many a trip.)

Shot from the back of our property. My wife is convinced that the Hobbit lives in that hill.
DSC_1290.jpg
 
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