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I found a trailer that is 20' and says it has a 2" ball. I remember reading somewhere on here (cant find it now) something about the size ball to tow being important and wanted to check with you guys with experience.

I could get by with a 18' I am sure but he wants 2k for the one I am looking at and always hear go bigger lol

thanks:gizmo:
 

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Interesting my 16’ 7k trailer has a 2 3/16 I think, know is bigger than 2” that would be a red flag for me. Confirm gross capacity
 

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Need more info

I found a trailer that is 20' and says it has a 2" ball. I remember reading somewhere on here (cant find it now) something about the size ball to tow being important and wanted to check with you guys with experience.

I could get by with a 18' I am sure but he wants 2k for the one I am looking at and always hear go bigger lol

thanks:gizmo:
Hi, yes the hitch wil tell you what size ball to use to tow it, and size does matter. Use the ball size indicated on the hitch. The ball size only tells you what size to use to safely pull the trailer. Not the cargo on it. It's pretty easy to overload a trailer. What is the Gross Vehicle Weight for the trailer. Meaning what is the maximum weight of the trailer and cargo? I have a 14 foot single axle trailer with a 2 inch ball hitch, but I'd never think of putting my tractor on it. Does the one you are looking at have a double axle? Does it have its own braking system? Does it have a ramp, or are you going to have to build one? Will the ramp support the weight of the tractor or other cargo? What kind of vehicle are you going to use to tow it? What kind of hitch does the vehicle have? How far are you planning on towing the trailer? Is it new or used? What kind of shape is it in? If it's used I'd check underneath for any surprises like a rusted out or cracked frame. Sorry for going off on a tangent, I'm thinking that you may have limited experiience with trailers and I'm trying to be as helpful as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for all the information as I am a novice

Hi, yes the hitch wil tell you what size ball to use to tow it, and size does matter. Use the ball size indicated on the hitch. The ball size only tells you what size to use to safely pull the trailer. Not the cargo on it. It's pretty easy to overload a trailer. What is the Gross Vehicle Weight for the trailer. Meaning what is the maximum weigI am ht of the trailer and cargo? I have a 14 foot single axle trailer with a 2 inch ball hitch, but I'd never think of putting my tractor on it. Does the one you are looking at have a double axle? Does it have its own braking system? Does it have a ramp, or are you going to have to build one? Will the ramp support the weight of the tractor or other cargo? What kind of vehicle are you going to use to tow it? What kind of hitch does the vehicle have? How far are you planning on towing the trailer? Is it new or used? What kind of shape is it in? If it's used I'd check underneath for any surprises like a rusted out or cracked frame. Sorry for going off on a tangent, I'm thinking that you may have limited experiience with trailers and I'm trying to be as helpful as possible.
:laugh:

I don't have much experience as you can clearly see so all this information is greatly apricated. It measures 7 by 20 and has a ramp on the back. It has twin axles with its on breaks. I think that is why they told it me the gross is around 7500 and I have read to deduct the weight of the trailer and that leaves me with about 5500 for my 1025 with loader and tiller and maybe a few odds and ends. I have a ram 1500 quad cab with the full trailer hitch. the one that is like to bars across and bolted in. The boards are new and I couldn't find rust so I am hoping its not covered by paint.

again thank you and all the others for their help!:greentractorride:
 

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Hi, yes the hitch wil tell you what size ball to use to tow it, and size does matter. Use the ball size indicated on the hitch. The ball size only tells you what size to use to safely pull the trailer. Not the cargo on it. It's pretty easy to overload a trailer. What is the Gross Vehicle Weight for the trailer. Meaning what is the maximum weight of the trailer and cargo? I have a 14 foot single axle trailer with a 2 inch ball hitch, but I'd never think of putting my tractor on it. Does the one you are looking at have a double axle? Does it have its own braking system? Does it have a ramp, or are you going to have to build one? Will the ramp support the weight of the tractor or other cargo? What kind of vehicle are you going to use to tow it? What kind of hitch does the vehicle have? How far are you planning on towing the trailer? Is it new or used? What kind of shape is it in? If it's used I'd check underneath for any surprises like a rusted out or cracked frame. Sorry for going off on a tangent, I'm thinking that you may have limited experiience with trailers and I'm trying to be as helpful as possible.
GVWR is the most important part of any trailering set up. I too have a single axle 14’ trailer but mine has a 5200 lb axle with the trailer being about 1100 or 1200 lbs. which leaves about 4000 lbs for payload. That is plenty for my 1025r with all attachments.

If the cost is not an issue I would probably own more than one trailer. A 20’ tandem aluminum and single axle 12’ aluminum. The 20’ will haul cars, trucks or almost anything other than real construction equipment which would need much higher GVWR. The 12’ is perfect for a sxs or golf cart where the 20’ becomes overkill.

If you are not experienced with trailers you might find a tandem easier to back up. Tandems do not react as quickly as single axle trailers and some people find it easier to back them up. Single axle trailers with under a 3000 lbGVWR are not required to have brakes but depending on your tractor and attachments may not have enough capacity. In my state trailers under 3000 GVWR are not required to be registered and have license plates.

If you live in an area where you would use the trailer in the winter steel trailers are prone to rusting quickly because of the road salt. I prefer aluminum, more expensive but they are lighter and handle winter road conditions better and look good far longer.
 

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If you want you can PM me and I can give you some info over the phone. I've pulled a trailer for my business for the last 30 years and I've had the last 6 trailers custom built, the most recent one this past Fall. Its an 18' all aluminum enclosed trailer. But I can help you by answering any questions you have.
 

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:laugh:

I don't have much experience as you can clearly see so all this information is greatly apricated. It measures 7 by 20 and has a ramp on the back. It has twin axles with its on breaks. I think that is why they told it me the gross is around 7500 and I have read to deduct the weight of the trailer and that leaves me with about 5500 for my 1025 with loader and tiller and maybe a few odds and ends. I have a ram 1500 quad cab with the full trailer hitch. the one that is like to bars across and bolted in. The boards are new and I couldn't find rust so I am hoping its not covered by paint.

again thank you and all the others for their help!:greentractorride:
Not a trailer expert here, but my thought is that if it only requires a 2" ball, it is not a very heavy duty trailer. Not sure, but I thought that most 2" balls are rated for 5,000 to 6,000 lbs. Aren't most tandem trailers of this size equipped with 2 - 3500 lb axles. The trailer rating may be more than what the ball rating is. :dunno: Can anyone elaborate on this? :unknown:
 

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Not a trailer expert here, but my thought is that if it only requires a 2" ball, it is not a very heavy duty trailer. Not sure, but I thought that most 2" balls are rated for 5,000 to 6,000 lbs. Aren't most tandem trailers of this size equipped with 2 - 3500 lb axles. The trailer rating may be more than what the ball rating is. :dunno: Can anyone elaborate on this? :unknown:
I found this on 2" Trailer Balls they range from 3500-12,000 lbs and it seems the stud size decides that.https://www.curtmfg.com/towing-accessories/trailer-balls/2-inch

CURT 2-5/16" trailer balls are built for heavy-duty towing applications and are typically used on full-size trucks and SUVs. We offer three finish options, including stainless steel, chrome and raw steel. 2-5/16" trailer balls range in capacity from 6,000 up to 30,000 lbs.

CURT 2" trailer balls are versatile and reliable. They are available in stainless steel or a chrome finish, and range in weight capacity from 3,500 lbs. up to 12,000 lbs. 2" trailer balls are used on everything from vans and SUVs to full-size trucks.

CURT 1-7/8" trailer balls are ideal for light-duty towing applications and smaller vehicles, such as passenger cars, minivans and crossovers. We offer these hitch balls in a stainless steel or chrome finish, and many are rated up to 3,500 lbs
 
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