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Discussion Starter #1
I am considering replacing my 2002 GMC 1500 4x4 pickup with about 121,000 miles on it.
I found a nice 2013 GMC 1500 4x4 pickup at a local dealer. It has about 46,500 miles on it.
I was excited about the truck until I read the car fax report. The truck was serviced in November of 2016 at 35,380 miles. On December 28, 2016 at 35,985 miles, a sensor was replaced.
On January 20, 2017 at 35,388 miles the engine oil pump was replaced. The report does not say, but my guess is that it was the oil pressure sensor was replaced first. There was almost a month between the sensor & the pump being change. The truck was only driven 3 miles during that time.
I am concerned about possible engine damage if the truck had low or no oil pressure.

On April 25, 2017 at 38,045 miles, the report states that axles were replaced. It does not state if they were front or rear axles. Why would axles need to be replaced at 38,000 miles.

The truck was traded in January of 2018 at 46,586 miles.

Thoughts?
 

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Thoughts? Find another truck. No need to take a mystery beating over it.

Pass the link to 56Fordguy. This is right up his alley. :good2:
 

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Generally if something looks too good to be true it probably is. I'm not sure you are going to get this cheap enough to cross your fingers about the story. It's entirely possible the oil pump was discovered without sustaining damage. It's equally possible it wasn't. I can think of several possibilities for axle replacement. I had a 94 GMC 6.5 Turbo diesel and if GM is still putting CV axles on the front, it could have easily been a torn boot on one. Flood damage, or a grenading rear could equally be possible. I'd definitely want the entire book on this one and a solid warranty clearly spelled out to boot. I have plenty of hobbies I enjoy. Visiting my truck at the dealership with the meter running isn't one of them.
 

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my 2cts-:munch:-sounds like this truck was in some water:dunno:me-i would pass on it.
 

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In 2014, GM released the current generation of the Silverado / Sierra trucks. And, they were "buying your business" with huge markdowns on a variety of configurations. The Double Cab 4x4 models seemed to get a lot of incentive to be moved.

What this ultimately means is that those trucks sold for about $32k-$35k new with a few options. A truck that sells low gets traded low, and should also get resold low. In other words, you should be able to find some reasonable prices on used trucks if you know how to shop.

Look for trucks that have at least 4-6 months between the manufacture date and the original in-service date - there's a reasonable chance that these trucks sold for 15-20% off of sticker and you should be able to use that in your negotiations. If you shop a GM dealership, you can also pit the used prices against the new ones for some leverage as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all for the input. I will pass on this one.
 

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Couple of thoughts:

- Shouldn't the selling dealer be able to pull the full service history for the vehicle? That would at least paint you a clearer picture of things.
- Don't understand your comment: "report states that axles were replaced. It does not state if they were front or rear axles." If it was "axles" then it is both, right? Or are they talking about components of an axle, like gears or axle shaft?
- Used stuff is used and is always a risk. Sometimes you luck out and find something in great shape without issues that was cared for well. Other times you have issues. When buying used you should always anticipate some repairs. That's the cost of the savings you got for not buying new. Hope it works. I try to avoid used for vehicles but I have seen it work out.
- In this case, I'd suggest letting it go if the full service history doesn't allay your concerns. There are millions of used vehicles out there and probably something less risky

Rob
 

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In 2014, GM released the current generation of the Silverado / Sierra trucks. And, they were "buying your business" with huge markdowns on a variety of configurations. The Double Cab 4x4 models seemed to get a lot of incentive to be moved.

What this ultimately means is that those trucks sold for about $32k-$35k new with a few options. A truck that sells low gets traded low, and should also get resold low. In other words, you should be able to find some reasonable prices on used trucks if you know how to shop.

Look for trucks that have at least 4-6 months between the manufacture date and the original in-service date - there's a reasonable chance that these trucks sold for 15-20% off of sticker and you should be able to use that in your negotiations. If you shop a GM dealership, you can also pit the used prices against the new ones for some leverage as well.
Do people really do things that way?? If I got a great deal on a vehicle, kept it a few years, and then went to sell or trade it I'd only let it go if I was getting a fair priced compared to the going market rate on sale or trade-ins. I would never think "yeah, I bought this for 3,000 less than I expected so I'm OK with the dealer giving me a few grand less on trade." The vehicle's worth is what it is based on the market.

Rob
 

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A lot of used trucks sold by dealers will have have warranties. Some of them are “ factory certified “ , with 100,000 mile warranties. Those are the only used 4x4 trucks I’d buy.

It doesn’t hurt to look at new trucks. I was able to get my xlt 250, for less than some of the used higher trim level trucks were priced at.
 

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I am considering replacing my 2002 GMC 1500 4x4 pickup with about 121,000 miles on it.
I found a nice 2013 GMC 1500 4x4 pickup at a local dealer. It has about 46,500 miles on it.
I was excited about the truck until I read the car fax report. The truck was serviced in November of 2016 at 35,380 miles. On December 28, 2016 at 35,985 miles, a sensor was replaced.
On January 20, 2017 at 35,388 miles the engine oil pump was replaced. The report does not say, but my guess is that it was the oil pressure sensor was replaced first. There was almost a month between the sensor & the pump being change. The truck was only driven 3 miles during that time.
I am concerned about possible engine damage if the truck had low or no oil pressure.

On April 25, 2017 at 38,045 miles, the report states that axles were replaced. It does not state if they were front or rear axles. Why would axles need to be replaced at 38,000 miles.

The truck was traded in January of 2018 at 46,586 miles.

Thoughts?



u didnt say what you 2002 truck engine is. but if its a ls 4.8/5.3 (even the old iron 4.3's go forever)those engines are about bomb proof as you can get seen many well over 300k miles easy to work on and cheap.. as far as the newer truck those are cylinder deactivation engines and have lots of sensors and often times the dealers will replace the oil pump on those if they are stuck on an issue with that cylinder deactivation system and cant figure it out.

GM is one of the best at honoring warrenties and they will replace entire assembly's with out hassle. one front axle may have had a tear in the boot so dealer replaced entire axle. ect ect but unless you need all the new fancy electronics i would pass on any new truck.:greentractorride:
 

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Do people really do things that way?? If I got a great deal on a vehicle, kept it a few years, and then went to sell or trade it I'd only let it go if I was getting a fair priced compared to the going market rate on sale or trade-ins. I would never think "yeah, I bought this for 3,000 less than I expected so I'm OK with the dealer giving me a few grand less on trade." The vehicle's worth is what it is based on the market.

Rob
You would let it go for what they're willing to offer. And, when the manufacturer allows for a ton of them to be sold at well below MSRP, that impacts the used value and trade value as well - ESPECIALLY if you trade it in at a manufacturer dealership (Ford->Ford, GM->GM, etc.).
 

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You would let it go for what they're willing to offer. And, when the manufacturer allows for a ton of them to be sold at well below MSRP, that impacts the used value and trade value as well - ESPECIALLY if you trade it in at a manufacturer dealership (Ford->Ford, GM->GM, etc.).
No, I would not. I would only do a deal if I thought the trade price was fair compared to the market value. Any special deal I may have gotten on it on the front end would not make me more willing to give it away. As for the "ton of them to be sold well below MSRP", sure... that's reducing the overall market value. Then yours is worth what the market is bearing, just as I've said. If you bought one for more than that "well below MSRP" amount it doesn't mean it will be worth more when you sell it.

Rob
 

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No, I would not. I would only do a deal if I thought the trade price was fair compared to the market value. Any special deal I may have gotten on it on the front end would not make me more willing to give it away. As for the "ton of them to be sold well below MSRP", sure... that's reducing the overall market value. Then yours is worth what the market is bearing, just as I've said. If you bought one for more than that "well below MSRP" amount it doesn't mean it will be worth more when you sell it.

Rob
I think we were both saying the same thing but in different ways. ;)
 

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Not sure what some of you have against the new trucks other than the price. :gizmo: i went from a worn out 99 to a 16. I’m not doing anything with with the 16, that I didn’t do with the 99. However the 16 effortlessly runs 80 mph towing the some loads that the 99 struggled to pull at 68 mph. Mpg is about the same. The new truck tends to occasionally get stuck just like the old one did.
 

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Not sure what some of you have against the new trucks other than the price. :gizmo: i went from a worn out 99 to a 16. I’m not doing anything with with the 16, that I didn’t do with the 99. However the 16 effortlessly runs 80 mph towing the some loads that the 99 struggled to pull at 68 mph. Mpg is about the same. The new truck tends to occasionally get stuck just like the old one did.
UM>>>>>>>>yes its the PRICE :gizmo:
 

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Not sure what some of you have against the new trucks other than the price. :gizmo: i went from a worn out 99 to a 16. I’m not doing anything with with the 16, that I didn’t do with the 99. However the 16 effortlessly runs 80 mph towing the some loads that the 99 struggled to pull at 68 mph. Mpg is about the same. The new truck tends to occasionally get stuck just like the old one did.
The double-edged sword for me is that the newer vehicles have more tech in them that makes driving more pleasant overall. But, the more crap you cram into the new vehicles, the more chances there are for something go wrong. And that leads you to the adage of "they don't make things like they used to."

Longest I ever owned a vehicle from brand new was about 5 years, and I really didn't drive that one the last 6 months or so that I owned because I bought something else in the interim. Oldest vehicle I owned was about four years old at the time of purchase and was gone in two from the purchase date.

Two weeks ago, I had a rental while out of town for work. Chevy Malibu. No backup camera. I'm still not sure how a car that new didn't have that option. :) But, it was good to validate that I can still back up well with just the mirrors. lol
 

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i will most likely be buried in my 06 dodge ram. zero desire for anything newer 260k of hard work on it and everything still works like new nice and tight yes even the crappy dodge tranny is original (yes i maintain my equipment well but expect them to work). when i want a/c i just turn a knob when i want radio i just turn a knob so very antique i know but im a little old fashion anyway. oh wait and its paid for so yes thats huge because im not rich and i work hard and cant affoard 500$ month much less 1000$ a month for a truck. just my opinion :greentractorride:
 

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The double-edged sword for me is that the newer vehicles have more tech in them that makes driving more pleasant overall. But, the more crap you cram into the new vehicles, the more chances there are for something go wrong. And that leads you to the adage of "they don't make things like they used to."
What you say is true about the potential for more points of failure, but I'd say the risk isn't really that big these days. I think for those of us that grew up with cars from the 70s/80s/90s we saw a lot of failures of then new-fangled stuff (power windows, power locks, sunroofs, turbos, etc.) but these days quality seems better. I've owned a lot of vehicles in the 2000's that have been 'full featured' and the amount of failure of what we consider 'high tech' stuff has been low. Remember when people actively steered away from vehicles with sunroofs because of how often they failed and how expensive it was to repair? I haven't seen a failed sunroof in 15+ years. Same for power windows & locks. And I still do my own repair for most things that do fail, so it can still be done even for 'high tech' items.

I guess in my experience things are as good or better than they have ever been. I've ran more vehicles past 100,000 miles in the last 10 years than I remember even seeing in the 80's. Had a Lexus IS300 that stayed in my family 16+ years until past 270K miles without any driveline or electronic failure beyond an 02 sensor and a headlight level adjustment sensor which perished due to MN's winter road salt about 15 years in. There was plenty of tech to fail there.

Rob
 

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What you say is true about the potential for more points of failure, but I'd say the risk isn't really that big these days. I think for those of us that grew up with cars from the 70s/80s/90s we saw a lot of failures of then new-fangled stuff (power windows, power locks, sunroofs, turbos, etc.) but these days quality seems better. I've owned a lot of vehicles in the 2000's that have been 'full featured' and the amount of failure of what we consider 'high tech' stuff has been low. Remember when people actively steered away from vehicles with sunroofs because of how often they failed and how expensive it was to repair? I haven't seen a failed sunroof in 15+ years. Same for power windows & locks. And I still do my own repair for most things that do fail, so it can still be done even for 'high tech' items.

I guess in my experience things are as good or better than they have ever been. I've ran more vehicles past 100,000 miles in the last 10 years than I remember even seeing in the 80's. Had a Lexus IS300 that stayed in my family 16+ years until past 270K miles without any driveline or electronic failure beyond an 02 sensor and a headlight level adjustment sensor which perished due to MN's winter road salt about 15 years in. There was plenty of tech to fail there.

Rob
When I refer to failures, I'm not talking about things like a power window motor - I'm talking about everything. So much in newer vehicles is controlled by software that all kinds of failures can occur because of programming errors. And what's irritating beyond belief is that they will ONLY honor updating that software when they fix programming errors during the "normal" warranty period of the vehicle - even if they don't FIND a problem until after your warranty has expired and you've been griping about the problem since day 1.
 
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