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Discussion Starter #1
I am green to trailers and what would be required to haul my 990. Total weight of the 990 is around 5000 lbs with the BH and FEL on. It is just under 20' long from the end of the BH to the end of the heavy duty bucket with the bucket down. So I am guessing that I need a 20" trailer. I like the ramps that drop down and you drive on them to put the tractor onto the trailer. Obviously I have to have something to tow it with too but I guess I should determine the weight that the truck would need to be able to tow as I look at that aspect of things. How much would a trailer weigh that would be able to haul my 990? Also I am guessing a dual axle is better than a single when it comes to this type of length but again I don't know. I have read some of these posts on braks and state laws etc. I live in NJ, one of the most expensive states in the country to live in especially tax wise so I am guessing its laws for trailers could possibly be pretty bad or over constrictive. Of course you never know.

What would something like this cost

Again I am just considering it. I may find that after I look at all the ramifications that it will not be worth it but I do want to investigate it.

Thanks for the input and help.
 

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I have no idea what the legal/tax situation in in NJ so I'm not going to even try to address that.

Trailers all have a "GWVR" - Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. That is the total amount of weight that the trailer can legally hold. So you need to look at trailers where the GVWR is more than the combined weight of your tractor + implements + the weight of the trailer itself.

The more common axles on these things are rated at 3500 or 5000 lbs (each). So you aren't going to find many single axle trailers that will work for you. But there are a LOT of dual axle trailers with a GVWR of 9,900 or 10,000 lbs. Those are probably in your target range.

In most States you'll get a ticket of your equipment is hanging off of the trailer while on a public road so yeah, a 20' is probably what you'd want - at least (Maybe a 24'!).

Since you are just starting to look, go on Craigslist and do a search on "Trailer" in the Heavy Equipment listings. That'll give you a good idea what you'd be looking at as well as prices in your area on used trailers. For something like that in my area new, it'd be in the $6000-$6500 area.
 
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You definitely want a tandem axle trailer with a minimum GVW of 7,000lbs. I just put my 20ft aluminum trailer up for sale that has a 7k rating, but only weighs 1500lbs, leaving 5500lbs available plus the tongue weight, netting about 6000lbs net available. When you calculate net available weight rating, you have to allow for the tare weight of the trailer (empty weight). In your situation, you could be marginal for a steel trailer, especially a well built trailer that could be a little heavier, but an aluminum trailer similar to mine would work well for you. Another thing to consider is the actual floor length. For example, mine is 18ft floor length plus 2ft dovetail. I believe you could get by with a 20ft trailer (18+2) as you could rest the BH on the dovetail, but anything smaller could be an issue. Mine is actually a car hauler trailer with ramps that store on the side under the bed. You could also consider an equipment trailer. These usually have stand-up ramps in the rear and can be had in heavier GVW ratings, however they usually weigh 3000 to 3500lbs. Hope this helps.

Dave
 
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If the length of your tractor is 20' you need a trailer that is longer than that. It is a must to be able to center the weight on the trailer properly.
 

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IMO, you need a 3/4 truck, 20' or 22' trailer rated for 10K GVW with brakes on both axles..

You said the length of the tractor from end to end is 20', but when loaded you can swing the hoe to one side and gain a foot or two..
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You definitely want a tandem axle trailer with a minimum GVW of 7,000lbs. I just put my 20ft aluminum trailer up for sale that has a 7k rating, but only weighs 1500lbs, leaving 5500lbs available plus the tongue weight, netting about 6000lbs net available. When you calculate net available weight rating, you have to allow for the tare weight of the trailer (empty weight). In your situation, you could be marginal for a steel trailer, especially a well built trailer that could be a little heavier, but an aluminum trailer similar to mine would work well for you. Another thing to consider is the actual floor length. For example, mine is 18ft floor length plus 2ft dovetail. I believe you could get by with a 20ft trailer (18+2) as you could rest the BH on the dovetail, but anything smaller could be an issue. Mine is actually a car hauler trailer with ramps that store on the side under the bed. You could also consider an equipment trailer. These usually have stand-up ramps in the rear and can be had in heavier GVW ratings, however they usually weigh 3000 to 3500lbs. Hope this helps.

Dave
Dave, if I lived closer to Kansas I would be interested in seeing your trailer. What brand or make is it? I would maybe be able to find one around my neck of the woods of like kind. I like the weight and all that you have described. Does your trailer have brakes on both axles? If so I am guessing that they are triggered by the braking of the vehicle which is towing it and that they are triggered by a 12V DC current maybe by the truck's brake lights. Again I am pretty green when it comes to this so I appreciate your input.
 

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Electric trailer brakes require the tow vehicle to have a brake controller installed. The brake controller varies the current applied to the brakes. How that is done varies controller to controller. Some are constant, some ramp the current up over time, others are proportional to brake pressure applied by the driver. Installation of a brake controller can be as simple as plugging one in to an already installed connector on the vehicle to a more complicated install that requires tapping into the main hydraulic brake line on the vehicle.
 

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Most if not all the newer trucks with a towing a package will have a factory installed brake controller.

Some of the 1/2 tons can tow over 10,000 lbs. A 3/4 ton isn't needed to pull our small tractors. After driving my dads Ford 14 150 / EB, I truly believe it will out pull my 99 Dodge 2500/ 360.
 

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Electric trailer brakes require the tow vehicle to have a brake controller installed. The brake controller varies the current applied to the brakes. How that is done varies controller to controller. Some are constant, some ramp the current up over time, others are proportional to brake pressure applied by the driver. Installation of a brake controller can be as simple as plugging one in to an already installed connector on the vehicle to a more complicated install that requires tapping into the main hydraulic brake line on the vehicle.
Just to add on to diesel's post above, since you will be looking for a tow vehicle, if you buy new you can order with a tow package and ask to have a brake controller installed by the dealer (some tow packages include the controller, some just provide the wiring for it). Any electric brake controller will work - they're standardized. If you go looking for a used vehicle, look at any trailer wiring it has and make sure there is a 7-pin plug. There are several trailer wiring configurations but the 7-pin is the one that will have the wiring for brakes. A 4-pin, for example, won't.
 

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A 3/4 ton isn't needed to pull our small tractors. After driving my dads Ford 14 150 / EB, I truly believe it will out pull my 99 Dodge 2500/ 360.
First off, a 990 isnt a "small tractor"..

Second, the truck makes a huge difference in towing... Yea, 1/2 tons have tons of power now days, as much as 3/4 ton gassers, but the 3/4 tons have much more suspension, brakes, and heavier frames..

I have a 03 F250 and used to have a 05 F350, take power and braking out of it, and they were worlds apart in how they handled the same trailer.. The 350 you didnt know the trailer was there.. Also, it was not a dually, ext cab shortbed 4X4 and the 250 is a reg cab 4X2.

3/4 and 1 tons have 1000-2000 lb curb weight advantage that makes all the difference in the world in how the truck will handle while towing..


:thumbup1gif:
 

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The 990 is 40hp and weighs 3,000lbs or am I mistaken ?. Deere changes model numbers so often its hard to keep up with them. Any tractor under 80 hp or so is a small tractor to me.:flag_of_truce:

Some of the new 1/2 tons can out pull the older 3/4 tons. I am not a Ford guy. but am impressed at how well my dads new F150 pulled my boat. I didn't believe how well it towed until I drove it myself.
 

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Might be 3000# bare but add back hoe, loader and bucket and it adds up.

Trailers typically come in 7000#, 10,000, and 14,000# ratings.

The BARE minimum you would need is an 18ft 7000# trailer. This isn't the BEST option but the cheapest minimum and should only be considered if you are really on a tight budget and only need to move it occasionally. With an 18ft you would have to back it on, turn the BH and have the bucket hang off the back a bit.

Best option would be 20ft 10K trailer. This lets you comfortably get the tractor on the trailer and tied down and isn't stretching the suspension and tires to the max. A 22ft would give you some extra room to move it forward and back a bit to get the best possible balance.

14K would be overkill but are easier to find than 10K trailers. They are also built tougher and would stand up better over long term but are heavier in weight.

For ramps make sure the trailer has drop down legs or the ramps have legs to stabilize when loading. It is possible for a heavy weight on the back end of a trailer to lift up the back end of the towing vehicle. Make sure flip down ramps can move in close enough to get your narrow track tractor on. Sometimes the slide the ramps are on get gummed up or rusted and won't let you slide them together or apart.

Personally I like tilt deck trailers. No need to mess with ramps at all.


For truck its hard to say 1/2ton or 3/4ton. Most new 1/2ton trucks are rated for 10K and can easily out pull a 15 year old 3/4ton. No need to go diesel unless you plan to tow A LOT. Generally though a 3/4ton will have beefier suspension, brakes and steering. Usually it will also have more options for lower gearing which can really help if you tow mountains or big hills. Generally a 3/4ton will last longer. We've had a couple failures at work on Ford 1/2tons of their new electric boost steering system that has caused the steering wheel to pretty much lock up. Wouldn't want to be towing when that happens.
 
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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
The weight on my 990 from what I have read is as follows:



Weight lbsnotes
MFWD 9903175(includes ROPS, 3-Point Hitch, and R-1 tires) mine has R-4 tires which I am assuming are heavier than the R-1 tires. It does not have the 3PH connected. That is all to say maybe the R-4 tires and 3PH balance each other out.
300CX FEL574
300CX frame115
8B BH985
8B BH Frame???The manual which I have does not show this weight. I would only be guessing at 250 lbs. If someone knows this weight I would love to know.
Canopy???I am going to guess that this ways in at around 100 lbs
Wheel Weights * 4 @ 110 lbs440Tires are not loaded
Total5289I am guessing that t

Here are pictures of the necessary frames that my 990/8B have:

JD 8B BH main frame_Page_1.jpg John Deere - 8B- Frames Reinforcement.jpg John Deere - 8B- Rear Hanger.jpg John Deere -8B - Front Hanger.jpg

My speculate is that weight of the 990 TLB could be 5600 lbs maybe 5700 lbs.

What do you all think of this trailer? CH20, a 20' aluminum Car Hauler trailer for hauling the 990?

Here are the specs on the 18, 20 and 22' trailers. If I went with the CH20 or something similar they will cover this weight but not by much!

CH18CH20CH22
Specifications
# OF AXLES222
BALL SIZE (in.)2 5/162 5/162 5/16
BED LENGTH (IN.)216240264
BED LENGTH IN FRONT OF FENDERS (side loading area)90 1/2100 1/2112 1/2
BED WIDTH BETWEEN FENDERS (in.)818181
BED WIDTH IN FRONT OF FENDERS (in.)101101101
CARRYING CAPACITY (lbs.)602059005780
GVWR (lbs.)750075007500
OVERALL LENGTH (IN.)267291315
TIRE/RIMSST205/75R 15D WHITEST205/75R 15D WHITEST205/75R 15D WHITE
TIRE/RIMS UPGRADEST205/75R 15D ALUM RIMSST205/75R 15D ALUM RIMSST205/75R 15D ALUM RIMS
TRAILER WEIGHT (lbs.)148016001720

My friend has a 2012, 4WD F150 with a 5.0 L V8, SuperCab, 145" wheel base and a 3.55 axial ratio. So by looking that up his truck is rated to tow 7700 lbs which again it should be able to pull this. However it is pretty close to the top on the limits.

Pages from 2012-f150-towing specs.jpg
 

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I'm with ErikR on that. You are looking at 5200# of equipment and the cargo capacity on that CH20 is only 5900#. With a full load of fuel, a spare tire for the trailer, a couple of tools and maybe one more implement going with you, you'd be over it's capacity.

I really like the idea of an Aluminum trailer but if it were me I'd look at their EHHD20 or even the 22' version of that.
 
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My friend has a 2012, 4WD F150 with a 5.0 L V8, SuperCab, 145" wheel base and a 3.55 axial ratio. So by looking that up his truck is rated to tow 7700 lbs which again it should be able to pull this. However it is pretty close to the top on the limits.

View attachment 44569
You also need to pay attention to the hitch weight. My '09 F-150 Super Crew has the max tow package with all the goodies and has an impressive towing capacity. However, the payload capacity of the truck is terrible - without looking at the specs right now I think I only have a 950# payload capacity - add myself and a full tank of fuel I'm down to about 430# - if my trailer hitch weight is over 400# I'm over the rated capacity of the truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks all for the advice. I did a little more research and my friends truck only will pull 7300 lbs so that won't work and all that you have said about the trailers is understood. I guess I will need to wait awhile till maybe I can get a truck. I looked at a Tundra today for the fun of it since I needed to take my Sienna in for service. It will pull 10000 lbs so that should be enough. but the thing with that truck is that it gets about 15 mpg. I believe that the Ford's and Dodges get better than that. This Tundra's sticker was a little over 37k and I am going to guess that that is where the others are at as well. I just need to wait. Again thanks for the advice.
 
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