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Discussion Starter #1
I am getting too old to be crawling on the ground anymore. Just too hard to get up. I am looking at a few vehicle lifts. One of them that strikes my interest is the GregSmithEquipment 2 pole vehicle lift. Model OH-10X 10,000 lb. lift. Has anyone had any experience with their lifts, or any garage lifts 2 pole? The heaviest thing I would be lifting would be my 2015 2500 HD Silverado which weighs in around 7,000 lbs. +/-. Any thoughts or inputs appreciated.
 

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Just my way at looking at this - I also can’t get under anything anymore -

$2500 can pay for an awful lot of oil changes and other work at the dealer or other shop.
Depends on how much equipment/vehicles you are maintaining.

For me:
2 vehicles, annual oil change (AMSOIL, so 15k/1 year change) $100
Pickup, 2 oil changes/yr $400
Rotate tires on said vehicles 2x/yr $200
SO, in under 5 years it's paid for itself just with basic maintenance on the daily drivers, not to mention the other uses you would find for it if you had it, ie tractor, ATV...

When I build my shop, I WILL have a lift in it. Just no ceiling height for it now.
 

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I do not disagree with either one of you. However, throw in a new rebuilt transmission or motor and now that cost just went way up. I have yet to find a garage in our area that does a decent oil change. Sure they change the oil and that is where it stops. I have had several times where my former truck would shift funny. Transmission fluid was never checked. Just happened to be low, same thing happened to my car. Power steering fluid low the list goes on. So having someone else do it is currently not in the equation. Not to mention I can use it on the tractor, two golf carts, my sons vehicles and the list can go on. At $2500 or so, is a cheap investment to be able to perform my own maintenance, for now. After that my son can do it for me if I am totally unable. By that time it has paid for itself and I will be dead and then do not really care at that point. :laugh:
 

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That truck must be with the gas engine. They normally weigh more than that... Or at least I am used to the crew cab Duramax versions.

Anyhow the big issue you are going to have is if your slab can support weight of the lift. Not only to you have the weight of the vehicle, the weight of the lift but it needs to be strong enough to support offset weight and keep it stabilized so it doesn't tip over.

I have a 4 post which is a little easier with the slab requirements so that might be an option. The problem with them is you are more limited with what work you can do. The do make optional jacks for them to pull a wheel or something like that.

I want to get a 2 post for working on stuff but it will go in a new garage not my current shop.
 

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I won't speak to the quality of the one you are looking at. I haven't used or seen one in person.

I like BendPak.

A couple things to think of.

Asymmetric vs symmetric. This has to do with how you have to load. A symmetric is normally a little cheaper, you need to balance the weight of the vehicle so the posts are as close to the CG as possible. The car is normally heavier where the engine is. Asymmetric you can load them pretty much however.

Rotated Posts. Bendpak has models where the square post is rotated about 45 degrees. This is nice because when you go to open the door to get out of the vehicle it gives you more room and you are not opening up the door on the corner of the square post.

This is the one I am looking at. Need the new garage first.

https://www.bendpak.com/car-lifts/two-post-lifts/xpr-10as/

Here are the requirements for the floor

LIFT MODEL CONCRETE REQUIREMENTS
XPR-10S/10AS SERIES 4” Min. Thickness / 3,000 PSI
 

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Depends on how much equipment/vehicles you are maintaining.

For me:
2 vehicles, annual oil change (AMSOIL, so 15k/1 year change) $100
Pickup, 2 oil changes/yr $400
Rotate tires on said vehicles 2x/yr $200
SO, in under 5 years it's paid for itself just with basic maintenance on the daily drivers, not to mention the other uses you would find for it if you had it, ie tractor, ATV...

When I build my shop, I WILL have a lift in it. Just no ceiling height for it now.
I do not disagree with either one of you. However, throw in a new rebuilt transmission or motor and now that cost just went way up. I have yet to find a garage in our area that does a decent oil change. Sure they change the oil and that is where it stops. I have had several times where my former truck would shift funny. Transmission fluid was never checked. Just happened to be low, same thing happened to my car. Power steering fluid low the list goes on. So having someone else do it is currently not in the equation. Not to mention I can use it on the tractor, two golf carts, my sons vehicles and the list can go on. At $2500 or so, is a cheap investment to be able to perform my own maintenance, for now. After that my son can do it for me if I am totally unable. By that time it has paid for itself and I will be dead and then do not really care at that point. :laugh:
I see your points.

I get my oil changed at the dealer for $43 which includes tire rotation, battery load test, and a bunch of other checks. Twice a year that’s $86 which was my point.

Any other work gets done at the dealer also as I can’t do it myself so that was my point I guess.
 

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Isn't it sad that when you get to the point in life when your wife will let you finally seriously consider buying a garage lift, your body is too weak to do most of those things you had always hoped to do with it when you got one.

:cry:
 

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a. The cost of labor of an oil change is almost nothing, so don't use that to financially justify the purchase. If it was me I would have other more compelling reasons than finance and they would only be rational to me!

b. A two post lift requires a reinforced concrete slab. Not for the compressive strength, but to resist the overturning moment. If you don't have a reinforced (and not just "reinforced" with mesh, real rebar) floor, you will need to excavate and put in pilings that can serve the same purpose, and that assumes the lift manufacturer has the engineering done for that kind of installation. A 4 post lift only needs concrete with sufficient compressive strength but they are nearly useless IMO for any kind of suspension work.

Al
 

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Isn't it sad that when you get to the point in life when your wife will let you finally seriously consider buying a garage lift, your body is too weak to do most of those things you had always hoped to do with it when you got one.

:cry:
That's the story of life. Have all these wants and plans when young but no money or time. Once you have time and money you no longer have the ability to do it.:dunno::dunno:
 

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I have a 2 post 9000 lb lift in my garage and it works fine. I have lifted everything I've owned in the last 20 years. To bad you're so far away as I might part with mine (getting to old to use it). The only thing you want to watch is ceiling clearance. You'll need a lot to get a vehicle up high enough to walk under it. My workshop has 10ft sidewalls and a vaulted ceiling so I can get a truck or car up as high as it will go. If you only have 8ft sidewalls and a flat ceiling I would say you'll have trouble with the height of the posts as they will be more than 8ft and only be able to lift a truck maybe 2 ft.
Ron
 

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I have a 2 post 9000 lb lift in my garage and it works fine. I have lifted everything I've owned in the last 20 years. To bad you're so far away as I might part with mine (getting to old to use it). The only thing you want to watch is ceiling clearance. You'll need a lot to get a vehicle up high enough to walk under it. My workshop has 10ft sidewalls and a vaulted ceiling so I can get a truck or car up as high as it will go. If you only have 8ft sidewalls and a flat ceiling I would say you'll have trouble with the height of the posts as they will be more than 8ft and only be able to lift a truck maybe 2 ft.
Ron
Yeah that is a good point. The ceiling where I have my 4 post is something like 16'. I have been able to lift anything up all the way as well. The main part of the existing shop only has 12' ceiling so I would have that issue with a 2post there which is why I want it in the new garage.
 

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:munch:

I don't particularly enjoy doing vehicle maintenance, and as an earlier poster said, "$2,500 will buy a lot of oil changes;" but one's time and convenience factor into the equation too.

Due to the Denver metro area's population boom; reputable oil change shops have upwards of a two hour wait just for an oil change. :banghead: I used to get in and out in about 30-minutes.

Then there is the 'is it done right' factor to contend with. My local Ford dealer's oil change labor rates are now in line with where they should be instead of being artificially low. The low labor rates encourage a herd 'em in, herd 'em out mentality to make money on the business.

I want a lift; but I need an outbuilding for one. I've never used a 2 or 4 post lift; but I can see the pros and cons of both. My neighbor has a 2-post that he's happy with; but he puts towels over the doors to avoid door dings. I'm not in the mood to contort myself just to get in and out of the car just to put it on and take it off a 2-post lift. The last lift I used was in high school auto shop and it was an old school center post lift that got in the way of everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
That truck must be with the gas engine. They normally weigh more than that... Or at least I am used to the crew cab Duramax versions.

Anyhow the big issue you are going to have is if your slab can support weight of the lift. Not only to you have the weight of the vehicle, the weight of the lift but it needs to be strong enough to support offset weight and keep it stabilized so it doesn't tip over.

I have a 4 post which is a little easier with the slab requirements so that might be an option. The problem with them is you are more limited with what work you can do. The do make optional jacks for them to pull a wheel or something like that.

I want to get a 2 post for working on stuff but it will go in a new garage not my current shop.
Mine has the Duramax with the Allison. So your right, it may be closer to 8000 or so. Another reason I wanted to ensure I had enough lifting power. The garage floor is not the problem. The floor was poured with 3000lb concrete, meshed and reinforced when the garage was built. The garage is 60X80 with 20' ceiling. When the guy built the garage his son was originally going to work on heavy equipment, i.e. tractors, dozers excavators etc. That fell through and I ended up with the garage when I bought the farm last year.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I won't speak to the quality of the one you are looking at. I haven't used or seen one in person.

I like BendPak.

A couple things to think of.

Asymmetric vs symmetric. This has to do with how you have to load. A symmetric is normally a little cheaper, you need to balance the weight of the vehicle so the posts are as close to the CG as possible. The car is normally heavier where the engine is. Asymmetric you can load them pretty much however.

Rotated Posts. Bendpak has models where the square post is rotated about 45 degrees. This is nice because when you go to open the door to get out of the vehicle it gives you more room and you are not opening up the door on the corner of the square post.

This is the one I am looking at. Need the new garage first.

https://www.bendpak.com/car-lifts/two-post-lifts/xpr-10as/

Here are the requirements for the floor

LIFT MODEL CONCRETE REQUIREMENTS
XPR-10S/10AS SERIES 4” Min. Thickness / 3,000 PSI
I was looking at the Bendpak but did not see anything that was $3500. I like this one. I will place it on my list to compare with and review. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I see your points.

I get my oil changed at the dealer for $43 which includes tire rotation, battery load test, and a bunch of other checks. Twice a year that’s $86 which was my point.

Any other work gets done at the dealer also as I can’t do it myself so that was my point I guess.
I agree with you CT. If I had not had so many bad experiences with shops I would do the same thing, giving the cost. But I think that between myself and my son it will pay for itself in the long run. Not to mention the satisfaction of doing it myself as long as I can.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Isn't it sad that when you get to the point in life when your wife will let you finally seriously consider buying a garage lift, your body is too weak to do most of those things you had always hoped to do with it when you got one.

:cry:
I'm with you Doc. Three weeks ago I was taken to the hospital ER in the early morning with major chest pains. Never had any health issues prior. Not a heart attack, but was diagnosed with Stage 2 Congestive heart failure with 24% ejection factor on my blood flow.. Go figure. I am rather healthy, eat good and am well above active. Only to find out it was an inherited trait. All the males on my moms side has died from CHF. I just turned 59 two days ago. So, it did not stop me but it has certainly slowed me down. So I am trying to look down the road. Doc say's I should be able to get back to about 50% blood flow in 6 - 12 months with meds.. So it is not a death sentence but sure as crap dented my activity and how I do things. I have not retired yet so I am trying to purchase what I can to make life easier for the old man when I actually do retire.
 

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I'm with you Doc. Three weeks ago I was taken to the hospital ER in the early morning with major chest pains. Never had any health issues prior. Not a heart attack, but was diagnosed with Stage 2 Congestive heart failure with 24% ejection factor on my blood flow.. Go figure. I am rather healthy, eat good and am well above active. Only to find out it was an inherited trait. All the males on my moms side has died from CHF. I just turned 59 two days ago. So, it did not stop me but it has certainly slowed me down. So I am trying to look down the road. Doc say's I should be able to get back to about 50% blood flow in 6 - 12 months with meds.. So it is not a death sentence but sure as crap dented my activity and how I do things. I have not retired yet so I am trying to purchase what I can to make life easier for the old man when I actually do retire.
I can tell you for a FACT that you can most likely restore your ejection fraction and slow down the CHF. How do I know? I have had it for years and I was in CHF and I just had a Muga Scan and Echo cardiagram of my heart and not only has my heart returned to "low normal", right on the borderline, but the chambers of my heart have actually gotten SMALLER, which is exactly what you want to occur.

As you said, it's most often hereditary and it is what it is......

I take 7 medications a day for my cardiac issues and the entire time I have been dealing with this, I have insisted on just keeping going.

I was diagnosed with this on my 45th birthday, which was a little over 10 years ago. I have also had Cardiomyopathy since in my 30's.

I do think that the 6 to 12 month time frame for returning to "low normal" is a bit optimistic as the heart has a lot of "changing" to do.

Just follow the course of medication, listen to the doctor and don't be "stupid" about the advice. When you feel "winded", rest. When you feel tired, take it easy. You will NOT get the results you need to extend your life by "forcing them".

CHF is a mother******, as it really can change your life. You get exhausted just doing what you used to and when you were younger, it didn't phase you. But you can restore normalcy to you life, just don't try and rush it.

It took me about 4 years to go from headed towards being on a heart transplant list to "low normal". Right now, my heart is at the very lowest ejection fraction which can be considered normal, but it's a HUGE IMPROVEMENT over where it was 4 years ago. Also, I notice a big difference in how fatigued my heart makes me. Now, I can walk around the entire neighborhood and when finished, not be exhausted. But it takes time.

My Cardiologist told me two weeks ago that my heart at it's peak was enlarged by nearly 40%. Now, it's considered "near normal" for my physical size, which is 6'4" and 270lbs. Bigger people need bigger hearts and there is a lot of truth in the old adage that your heart is about the size of your fist.......

So, there is light at the end of the tunnel if you take the medicine and follow the protocol. But just be PATIENT, as you can't rush this process...............:good2:
 

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Three weeks ago ... diagnosed with Stage 2 Congestive heart failure with 24% ejection factor on my blood flow ... not a death sentence but sure as crap dented my activity and how I do things.
Sorry to hear that. Sadly, once health issues start arising, one really has to reevaluate everything, as it appears you are doing. My questions would be: Is your dissatisfaction with shops because they don't do things as well as you could, the time spent waiting or that maint/repairs don't work? Do you actually enjoy the tasks that the lift would enable you to do? More than most other activities? Does your son? If you become unable to do the tasks, will your son have the time to make use of the lift? Not trying to be Debbie Downer, but this from someone who has been through health before/after scenerios both personally & with family. Just questions perhaps to think about, not answer here. Sometimes a door closes and another unexpectedly opens with a life-style change. Hoping the best for you.
 

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Mine has the Duramax with the Allison. So your right, it may be closer to 8000 or so. Another reason I wanted to ensure I had enough lifting power. The garage floor is not the problem. The floor was poured with 3000lb concrete, meshed and reinforced when the garage was built. The garage is 60X80 with 20' ceiling. When the guy built the garage his son was originally going to work on heavy equipment, i.e. tractors, dozers excavators etc. That fell through and I ended up with the garage when I bought the farm last year.
Ok, that is more information we didn't have the original post. A 2 post lift should work well for you. The one nice thing still about a 4 post is that they don't have to be secured to the floor. I have wheels for mine so I can wheel it around and it only runs on 110v 15A cord so it is easy to find a place to plug it in. We mainly use ours for vehicle storage in the winter and oil changes in the summer. I don't bother with oil changes on the truck because the dealer is so close and I can hardly buy the oil and filter for what they charge. For my car I do them myself. In the summer I put it up on the lift but in the winter I just pull it up on ramps. I would like a 2 post though for doing stuff like this and other things like rotating the tires, brake jobs and such.

I was looking at the Bendpak but did not see anything that was $3500. I like this one. I will place it on my list to compare with and review. Thanks.
Like I said the biggest thing that has me leaning toward Bendpak is those rotated posts. I think I said earlier they are turned 45 degrees. I looked at the page, they are 30 degrees. As I mentioned this gives you more room to open a door with less risk of causing damage and is the biggest reason I will go with them if I get one. The one I linked to is the 12' version which will fit in most garages. If you have more room they make models with more lift. They also make units where the posts are further apart. Another option you have to consider is if you want the link between the post to go across the floor or across the top. Of course it is nice to keep the floor clear but if you run it across the top that is going to be your limiting factor. If that is at 12' and your ceilings were 12' it doesn't matter much. If you have a lot more clearance, then maybe it is better to have that link across the floor. They make them both ways. Of course as you add more to it the price goes up but they do have a lot of options.
 
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