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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I need some help finding a solution to a wiring problem in my wife school classroom. My wife is a music teacher so you can guess this time of year is busy with concerts. She has a stereo in her room that she also uses for concerts. She has to haul it down to the gym as well as two of the four speakers. I went and wired the speakers up with bullet connectors so that she could just unplug the speakers in her class room, move things to the gym and plug in the extension wiring I made for her complete with the correct bullet connectors. The problem is that the darn bullet connectors won't stay on. They either slide off, break off, or they are so darn hard to get apart my wife breaks them off and the wire as well. In two weeks I've put 20 new ones back on. The bigger issue is that the wiring is small, 18-20 gauge at most. If I crimp to hard, I cut the wire. If I don't crimp them hard enough, the bullet connectors just slide off. The connectors I'm currently using are these GB Bullet Splices at Blain's Farm & Fleet.

Anybody got any ideas as to how I can make things easy to connect and disconnect without having to put new ends on each time? Is the wiring just to small of a gauge and I should just buy these GB GB-3 Orange WireGard Color - Coded Screw - On Wire Connectors at Blain's Farm & Fleet. Then could just un twist them and retwist once stuff is in the gym? Just looking for a way to make things easier on my wife when it comes to moving stuff for concerts.

Thanks,

Tony
 

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Not an expert

I'm certainly not an expert in this area but if I need something to stay on a wire, I solder it. If it has to be connected and disconnected, I'll wrap the fitting and wire with tape and or use liquid tape to provide some strength to the connection.

I would also suggest bigger wire. 18 ga. is ok if you are hooking it up and leaving it. For your use, I would go bigger. If it's a long run, it will help the amplifier out as well.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm certainly not an expert in this area but if I need something to stay on a wire, I solder it. If it has to be connected and disconnected, I'll wrap the fitting and wire with tape and or use liquid tape to provide some strength to the connection.

I would also suggest bigger wire. 18 ga. is ok if you are hooking it up and leaving it. For your use, I would go bigger. If it's a long run, it will help the amplifier out as well.

Treefarmer
The small gauge is the issue on the speaker wires. I agree it's meant to hook up and leave, but unfortunately that isn't an option. I'm trying to find a third set of speakers currently. Then the four in the room can stay put, and she can use the longer wires I made and the third set of speakers for concerts. Problem is finding speakers that have the correct connections for the back of the stereo that actually sound decent.
 

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Hiya,

I take it that this is a low priced system with screw terminals on the rear of the speakers. 18G wire is OK for low power systems but there are so few strands it tends to break easily and often. Also, bullet connectors are meant for semi permanent connections such as wiring harness.

I would suggest you replace the 18g with a cheap 2 conductor 120v polerized plug extension cord. Cut the cord in half, strip, tin and attach the wires to the amp and speakers and simply plug the plugs of the cord together. The polerized plug will assure the connections are right.
 

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I would suggest you replace the 18g with a cheap 2 conductor 120v polerized plug extension cord. Cut the cord in half, strip, tin and attach the wires to the amp and speakers and simply plug the plugs of the cord together. The polerized plug will assure the connections are right.
^^^^^^^^^^^
This.
Quite a few bands I used to work with (doing sound) just used 12 gauge extension cords for speaker cable-cheap, easy, and readily available if there was an oopsy. You could get by with 14 or 16 for this system.
 

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XT60's are nice, and I use them on some of my RC airplanes, but they can sometimes be hard to separate. They are fairly small and can be hard to grip. Also, if you apply too much heat during soldering, the pins can get a bit mis-aligned, thus making them even harder to put together and pull apart. You can end up pulling on the wire to separate and with small gauge wire, they often break at the solder joint.

I happen to like anderson powerpoles much better, they come in 15, 30 and 45 amp ratings (different sized wire) using the same housing. Can be crimped or soldered, and they go together and come apart easily. And they are "genderless" and polarized. Genderless can be good or bad, depending on application. Prices vary depending on where you buy.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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As part of the process, you may want to open up the back of the speaker, remove the screw-terminal block, and solder directly to the wires of the speakers themselves. Heat-shrink tubing over the wiring will keep in clean and protected and you will be able to use a slightly heavier gauge wire.

From there, the two-pole plastic connectors are the way to go... Power cords are a giant no-no, especially in a school where the safety of kids is at stake (and one could certainly try and plug a speaker or the amp into an outlet).
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Hiya,

I take it that this is a low priced system with screw terminals on the rear of the speakers. 18G wire is OK for low power systems but there are so few strands it tends to break easily and often. Also, bullet connectors are meant for semi permanent connections such as wiring harness.

I would suggest you replace the 18g with a cheap 2 conductor 120v polerized plug extension cord. Cut the cord in half, strip, tin and attach the wires to the amp and speakers and simply plug the plugs of the cord together. The polerized plug will assure the connections are right.
Actually the wires are hard wired directly into the speakers. The wire is permanently attached to the speakers. The back of the stereo itself has the spring loaded terminals that you just slip the bare wire into. You are correct on the low priced system however. It was all of $150, but all the school would pay for. The sub has its own connection, looks like a phone connection only smaller.


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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the ideas folks. I going to have to do some investigating. With the small gauge of wire it really needs to be permanently connected in the classroom I know but she has to move it. May have to look on Amazon and just see what I find. Have had no luck on finding a third set of speakers either.


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Hiya,

I take it that this is a low priced system with screw terminals on the rear of the speakers. 18G wire is OK for low power systems but there are so few strands it tends to break easily and often. Also, bullet connectors are meant for semi permanent connections such as wiring harness.

I would suggest you replace the 18g with a cheap 2 conductor 120v polerized plug extension cord. Cut the cord in half, strip, tin and attach the wires to the amp and speakers and simply plug the plugs of the cord together. The polerized plug will assure the connections are right.

PLEASE DO NOT DO THIS

You are running the risk of someone mistakenly plugging that extension cord into an outlet and energizing a low voltage system with AC Line Voltage and someone could get killed doing so.

There are many other safer ways to accomplish what you are seeking. The audio world would use a phoenix connector or an RCA connections.
 

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I need some help finding a solution to a wiring problem in my wife school classroom. My wife is a music teacher so you can guess this time of year is busy with concerts. She has a stereo in her room that she also uses for concerts. She has to haul it down to the gym as well as two of the four speakers. I went and wired the speakers up with bullet connectors so that she could just unplug the speakers in her class room, move things to the gym and plug in the extension wiring I made for her complete with the correct bullet connectors. The problem is that the darn bullet connectors won't stay on. They either slide off, break off, or they are so darn hard to get apart my wife breaks them off and the wire as well. In two weeks I've put 20 new ones back on. The bigger issue is that the wiring is small, 18-20 gauge at most. If I crimp to hard, I cut the wire. If I don't crimp them hard enough, the bullet connectors just slide off. The connectors I'm currently using are these GB Bullet Splices at Blain's Farm & Fleet.

Anybody got any ideas as to how I can make things easy to connect and disconnect without having to put new ends on each time? Is the wiring just to small of a gauge and I should just buy these GB GB-3 Orange WireGard Color - Coded Screw - On Wire Connectors at Blain's Farm & Fleet. Then could just un twist them and retwist once stuff is in the gym? Just looking for a way to make things easier on my wife when it comes to moving stuff for concerts.

Thanks,

Tony
Why not get some real wire? The bigger the wire the better. Also what are the lengths being used? The longer the run the heavier the wire should be. Tinning prior to crimping along with strain relief is important.
There may be commercially available.
 

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what about some RCA or 9mm phono plugs?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
what about some RCA or 9mm phono plugs?
Couldn't use these as the stereo only has the connections to put the bare wire in.


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