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How do you guys feel about using anti-seize on lug nuts? Yea, or nay, or whatever?

I'm getting ready to get a new set of tires, will be removing and reinstalling the wheels on the tractor myself. I checked the other day to make sure they weren't on so tight I couldn't remove them; my impact wrench easily loosened them, and the threads all looked good on the ones I completely removed to inspect. I used anti-seize on my sports car's lugs, torqued to 85 ft-lb., and never had any of them work loose. I don't expect to have to remove these again once I get the new tires on, unless I have a flat or some similar reason. Not like I'll rotate the fronts to the back or vice-versa any time soono_O:rolleyes:, but since they'll be on a long time, I just don't want the lug nuts to rust-weld themselves to the hubs.
 

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I’m a believer in using a dab of anti-seize on bolts/nuts that don’t get removed often. You don’t need much to do the trick.
 

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Torque specs are a little bit lower with lubricated bolts. I'm thinking the wheels could stay on for a decade or more, so a little anti-seize isn't going to hurt the situation as long as you check the torque from time to time.
 

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I've asked the tire shops to use anti-seize on the lugs and around the hub on our work trucks. The hub carries the load and the clearance is minimal to the point it doesn't take much for the rims to rust on tight to the hub. They refuse to do so. When I inquire why, they can't give me a reason, other than they'll loose their job. If I had to guess, I would speculate they are concerned about it making its way to on to brake components, impacting braking performance and, in turn, liability exposure. I always do and never had an issue. When the tire shop has to remove a wheel, they are sure glad the anti-seize is there as it saves a fight.
 

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I use it, sparingly as others do, and also give a very light coat on the face of the hub.
 

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Sounds like it's not a bad idea, I'll go the Brylcreem route.

Thanks for the input.
You beat me to it, except less than a dab will do it.

I wonder how many have no idea what Brylcreem is.:)
 

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I use it on the hub faces and the studs. Sometimes sparingly sometimes not. Most shops will not and if I remember correctly my VW manuals always said not to lubricate them. I always did and I never had to replace a stud because it twisted off.
 

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I use it on the hub faces and the studs. Sometimes sparingly sometimes not. Most shops will not and if I remember correctly my VW manuals always said not to lubricate them. I always did and I never had to replace a stud because it twisted off.
I've heard (but never seen it myself) stories about using anti seize and then overtightening the lug nuts to the point of breaking them if using an air wrench. I never tighten lug nuts with an impact wrench, only remove them. It's more work, but I hand tighten them and then torque them with a torque wrench. Manual says 133 ft-lb. for the four front lug nuts, and 85 ft-lb. for the six rear nuts. Not sure my wrench will go 133, I think mine tops out at 100 or 110. That'll have to do.
 

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I usually go to a 100 after using a torque stick to 90 Or my craftsman cordless impact which stops after a few ratchets at 90 and would take a minute to find 100. I go higher on the truck. Then manual numbers are crazy high.
 

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...i always try to put a bit on the lug threads on all my equipment...i always torque or use a torque stick on lugs...i use it to prevent thread welding and to assist in getting the initial torque right...its always been my understanding that any torqued threads needed light lubricant to torque correctly since torque is a bolt streach spec not a friction spec .....never ever had a issue
 

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You beat me to it, except less than a dab will do it.
I wonder how many have no idea what Brylcreem is.:)
Vitalis, nuff said. ?


I use it on the hub faces and the studs. Sometimes sparingly sometimes not. Most shops will not and if I remember correctly my VW manuals always said not to lubricate them. I always did and I never had to replace a stud because it twisted off.
2015 Subaru Forester, I've had to replace 3 lug bolts. I do sort of put partial blame on the service shop.
 

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Being here in western New York and working in an industry that pumps all kinds of fluids I use a lot of never seize. We use a copper based product made by Loctite. Higher heat rating than that silver stuff and you can actually wipe it off your hands for the most part. I use it on all lug nuts and hubs. Just torque to manufactures specs. I try to avoid using the one or two chuga chuga impact method
 

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Being here in western New York and working in an industry that pumps all kinds of fluids I use a lot of never seize. We use a copper based product made by Loctite. Higher heat rating than that silver stuff and you can actually wipe it off your hands for the most part. I use it on all lug nuts and hubs. Just torque to manufactures specs. I try to avoid using the one or two chuga chuga impact method
Wow... that would be nice!
 

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Being here in western New York and working in an industry that pumps all kinds of fluids I use a lot of never seize. We use a copper based product made by Loctite. Higher heat rating than that silver stuff and you can actually wipe it off your hands for the most part. I use it on all lug nuts and hubs. Just torque to manufactures specs. I try to avoid using the one or two chuga chuga impact method
I've seen the product and Permatex also offers a copper based anti-seize. I actually, believe there are some other variations as well. I've always meant to, but never took the time to determine what feature/benefit/drawbacks the other variations would have. Can anyone share their wisdom? I hope its insignificant. I don't have any available shelf room for umteen different flavors of anti-seize as I do with Loctite.
 

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I've seen the product and Permatex also offers a copper based anti-seize. I actually, believe there are some other variations as well. I've always meant to, but never took the time to determine what feature/benefit/drawbacks the other variations would have. Can anyone share their wisdom? I hope its insignificant. I don't have any available shelf room for umteen different flavors of anti-seize as I do with Loctite.
From the Permatex website:

Permatex Aluminum based anti-seize:

Suggested Applications: For easy removal of spark plugs, cylinder head and exhaust head bolts; apply to anchor pins on brake assemblies, u-bolts and spring bolts, hinges, gears, chain, sprockets and rollers. Temperature range: -60°F to 1600°F

Permatex Nickel based anti-seize:

Suggested Applications: Exhaust manifold bolts, exhaust system bolts, muffler clamps and tailpipe assemblies. Temperatures up to 2400°F, It is recommended where copper contamination must be avoided.

Permatex Copper based anti-seize:

Suggested Applications: Spark plug threads installed in aluminum, exhaust manifold bolts, engine bolts, oxygen sensors, knock sensors, thermostat housing bolts, and fuel filter fittings. Temperature range: -30°F to 1800°F
 

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I've heard (but never seen it myself) stories about using anti seize and then overtightening the lug nuts to the point of breaking them if using an air wrench. I never tighten lug nuts with an impact wrench, only remove them. It's more work, but I hand tighten them and then torque them with a torque wrench. Manual says 133 ft-lb. for the four front lug nuts, and 85 ft-lb. for the six rear nuts. Not sure my wrench will go 133, I think mine tops out at 100 or 110. That'll have to do.
Dont try to take the blade bolt off an MX5 rotary then. It takes 700 for-lbs to loosen the nut from the blade bolt. I did not have access to a torque multiplier so I had to take a 1” impact to remove the nuts. I put them back with a new DeWalt 1/2” XR impact. It’ll do 700 ft-lbs and will break a 1200 ft-lb. it has a 60v Flex battery in it but is a 20v unit. My sons got it for me as a CHRISTmas gift.
 

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Tire Rack instructions for new wheels/tires for my car said not to use it on the lug bolts. I did because I have done it for about 50 years on all of my cars and never had one loosen on me. Not sure why they advise against it.
 
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