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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So what kind of things should I keep in the garage for regular expected (or somewhat unexpected) maintenance and repairs on my new-to-me 1026R? (240hrs, 60D mulcher, H120, bucket, forks, RB5060 back blade)

It's supposed to rain all week, so I won't be going out to play with the tractor. If I don't keep myself busy this week while it's raining, I'm going to end up just sitting on the seat staring at the lights blinking. Might as well do some maintenance on it instead. I've ordered grease and a grease gun coming tomorrow. So I plan to grease everything there is to grease in the next few days. I'm also going to pick up the home maintenance kit from the dealer on the way home Monday to change the oil and filters. Going to take the mower off, clean it, get the blades sharpened, etc. Any other suggestions? Tire slime? Hydo oil/filter??

I have a pretty decent collection of hand and air tools in the garage. But nothing tractor specific. Any specific tools I should look at keeping on hand?
 

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Sounds like you have everything you need.
Only thing I would suggest is a battery maintainer like a Battery Tender jr. $25 is cheap insurance to know you have a good charge when you go to start it after sitting for a while.
 

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Sounds like you have everything you need.
Only thing I would suggest is a battery maintainer like a Battery Tender jr. $25 is cheap insurance to know you have a good charge when you go to start it after sitting for a while.
Definitely. It's going to be getting used every few days through the fall. But it's on the to-do list, especially for over the winter.
 

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I would change the hydro oil in the trans and front axle in addition, since it's new to you, just to be sure. One thing I found that helps to do both and get under the tractor...I used 4x6x30" pieces of wood as ramps instead of using jack stands. The extra 3-1/2" lift was enough for me to get a large kitty litter pan under the trans to drain the oil. You need something big, as the trans hold about 3-1/2 gallons. The 4x6's also allowed me to use coffee cans for draining the front axle hubs. When I did my H-oil change, I used a little over 4 gallons. IIRC, I used 14 qts in the trans and 3?? in the front axle. Save yourself a trip and get a quart or 2 extra.
 

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I would change the hydro oil in the trans and front axle in addition, since it's new to you, just to be sure. One thing I found that helps to do both and get under the tractor...I used 4x6x30" pieces of wood as ramps instead of using jack stands. The extra 3-1/2" lift was enough for me to get a large kitty litter pan under the trans to drain the oil. You need something big, as the trans hold about 3-1/2 gallons. The 4x6's also allowed me to use coffee cans for draining the front axle hubs. When I did my H-oil change, I used a little over 4 gallons. IIRC, I used 14 qts in the trans and 3?? in the front axle. Save yourself a trip and get a quart or 2 extra.
Better yet, buy the Low Vis in the 5 gallon containers as the empty containers are great for using for storing your old oil and fluids for recycling.....

(Hey Kyle, I haven't "spoken to you" in awhile. Hope all is well with you. It messes our weekend up when NASCAR can't do anything due to the rain so you can't root on the #18....:laugh: Stay Well, and Go #78.....:good2: Truex. Sounds like he might not have a ride next year now, due to 5 hour energy bailing out of the sport, as well.....)

My dealer runs special in February and August of each year where they put their fluid and filters on sale. I always pick up the next two changes of filters and at least 5 gallons of Hydro oil then. I think the 5 gallon on hydro low viscosity fluid on sale brings the price near $10 per gallon, which is cheaper than the per gallon price by quite a margin.....

As far as things I keep on hand for my tractor they include

Engine and Hydro Oil Filters
Fuel Filters (both filters, several of the under floor board filter)
Extra seat switch (when they go bad, they are a headache so I keep a spare just in case)
Inner and Outer Air filters


These are just ideas, I am not recommending you keep all of this stuff.........

Here are pictures of my spare parts boxes I keep for things which I have needed over the years for my 455 and now for my 1025R as well as I still have the 455....There are some Honda Generator parts mixed in as well......The 90 degree pins with the holes in them are the trip pins for the 54" front snow plow. I have broken many of those over the years. There are also some links in this kit for hooking chains or straps.

You do NOT need to keep all of these parts, as many are needed only once in a great while. But I keep them as when plowing snow, I have to really minimize down time as I have as many as 17 driveways I plow in our neighborhood. So, when something breaks, I needs to be able to replace it and return to plowing or snow removal. Much of my plowing and snow removal starts at 3am and is done by 6 am so I don't want to have to wait for the dealer to open.





This kit has rod ends in it as lots of plowing snow and carrying around front implements puts wear on the rod ends and steering rod ends. Also have the seat switch in this kit plus other springs and pins which are used on the front mounted Quick Hitch of the tractors. The springs wear out and make keeping the retention pins in difficult.



These kits have odds and ends such as spindle bearings for the 455 as well as the hydraulic covers and caps for the quick connects. I keep all of the Deere parts together so I can find them when I need them. I also keep a master link and spare drive chain for the front mounted 47" snow blower and of course, spare quick connect fittings for the hydraulics.

You will also note a spare thermostat and gasket and several other things, especially the hitch pins and items related to the front quick hitch mount and assembly with the 90 degree hydraulic fittings on the angle cylinder as ice tends to bend those over time.

There are also an extra set of 54" plow shoes, of the Heavy Duty type, in the bottom of the box under many of the items. I have lost shoes over the winter, but always find them in the spring once everything melts....:laugh: In the meantime, you need spares. :dunno:

 

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So what kind of things should I keep in the garage for regular expected (or somewhat unexpected) maintenance and repairs on my new-to-me 1026R? (240hrs, 60D mulcher, H120, bucket, forks, RB5060 back blade)

It's supposed to rain all week, so I won't be going out to play with the tractor. If I don't keep myself busy this week while it's raining, I'm going to end up just sitting on the seat staring at the lights blinking. Might as well do some maintenance on it instead. I've ordered grease and a grease gun coming tomorrow. So I plan to grease everything there is to grease in the next few days. I'm also going to pick up the home maintenance kit from the dealer on the way home Monday to change the oil and filters. Going to take the mower off, clean it, get the blades sharpened, etc. Any other suggestions? Tire slime? Hydo oil/filter??

I have a pretty decent collection of hand and air tools in the garage. But nothing tractor specific. Any specific tools I should look at keeping on hand?
I own and use all of the specific items on this list, just FYI.

A good pair of Filter Pliers, like these are always handy.....

https://www.amazon.com/TEKTON-5866-12-Inch-Filter-Pliers/dp/B000NPR33O/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1536442514&sr=8-3&keywords=oil+filter+pliers

The grease gun locking tip makes using it so much easier. Lock and lube

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00H7LPKKU/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Also, this needle adapter for greasing the drive shaft u joints

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000N321UQ/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1


These are the first "specific tools" which many don't seem to have and make servicing your tractor very easy. Also, this drain pan as the tractor holds a ton of fluid and this pan can catch it all without jacking up the tractor.....

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EE3LRZG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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I spent about 40 years working on cars as a hobby, and I thought that I had a good collection of wrenches. As a car guy, 7/8-inches was my big wrench. Same for my collection of sockets.

IMG-1044.JPG

But, I discovered with my 1025R and collection of implements, that a set of wrenches and sockets an order of magnitude larger were needed. These are 15/16 through 1-7/8 inches.

IMG-1045.JPG

Finally, I had both analog and digital torque wrenches, but neither of them approached the torque settings I encountered need for on the tractor. And the 1/2 inch impact wrench needed to be super-sized as well.
 

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You got a nice little parts inventory there SB. Good idea, especially with all you do in your neighborhood. Like you say, you can't afford to have the machine down for long when you have that many drives to clean.

Yeah, I see Indy got a little wet this weekend. Rain out puts the 18 on the pole with the 4 outside. Kyle has dominated that track when he runs in clean air. We'll see how it goes tmrw. The 78 got moved to the back of the field for failing inspection 3 times. He'll have his work cut out for him, but it's a long race. Also rumor is he'll be moved into the 19 car next year. Interesting to see the developments there.

:)
 

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I keep a rubber mallet and a small plastic scraper on the tractor at all times.

The mallet is used to politely coax various parts when re-configuring the tractor with attachments and implements. For example, it's great for moving the tines on the fork lift or seating the pin on the backhoe bucket quick-change.

The small plastic scraper is used to scrape off excess dirt clods on the buckets (FEL and backhoe) at the work site, before taking the tractor back into the garage. It amazes me how these clods can remain in place for hundreds of feet over rough ground, then fall off immediately once in the garage. You can buy one at Walmart for about a quarter in the paint department.

And don't forget ear protectors.
 

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Since most hardware on the 1026R is metric, you will want a nice set of metric combination wrenches, metric allen wrenches and metric sockets. You will also need a fairly large pair of pliers to loosen the fuel filter bowl attaching ring.

There really aren't any "special" tools need to work on a tractor, mostly just standard tools but mostly metric.
 

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Wow! You asked, you got an answer. Pretty much covers it on what was covered on this thread. :munch:
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Ordered numerous things based on this :)
 

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Do you have 3/4 inch sockets and handles? That is something I need to get. I never needed large sockets until I got my 1025r. Socket sizes to use on nut and bolts that are too big to come in 1/2 inch. I don't plan to dissemble, but you have to check to see if those bolts are still tight from time to time. I figured I would buy a 3/4 ratchet or handle and the socket sizes as needed instead of a set.
 

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Here's my stuff:

2 screwdrivers, 1 + and 1 -
- can also serve as prybar or chisel
+ can also serve as punch
2 hammers, 1 claw and 1 ballpein
Adjustable wrench that can also be a hammer
Oh, and duct tape

I may have watched an episode or 2 of Red Green :lol:
 

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LOL! I have all of the above, and they have all been used as such :)
 

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I have a 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2" torque wrenches. The 1/4 goes form 20-250 INCH pounds (used for small engines and transmission work) , the 3/8 goes from 10-100 foot-pounds, and the 1/2 goes from 50-250 foot-pounds. They are all click type, but the digital ones have a wider range. Take your pick which one you need.

3/4" drive tools are not needed for these smaller tractors. 1/2" are just fine.
 
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One more thing

With winter here, I remembered another essential part for the tractor's on-board tool box.

It took roughly 25 years before the first link broke on my first tractor's tire chains. The links were worn down and so thin it didn't take much to break one. When this happens, you will notice it from the "clank, clank, clank" sound as the broken chain hits your frame or fender as the tractor moves. You'll stop the tractor, your light bulb will go on, and you'll wish you had just the right thing to fix this problem. Otherwise, you'll have to remove a chain right where you are at.

Pick up a few quick links that are about the same size as the links in your chain. Make sure the opening on the quick links is big enough to accept the links on your tire chains. These work very well even on a permanent basis. By the time one of these wears through, the rest of your tire chain's links will have worn through and the entire tire chain will have been replaced.

links.JPG

Keane
 
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