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Discussion Starter #1
Well it all started last June when we had a hail storm come through. We were not home but I saw lots of roofing being done last summer. I was talking with a neighbor this spring and he mentioned that he was having his insurance adjuster out to look at damage. He found out they are putting a new roof on his house and polebarn.

We have 4 buildings on the property. (House, Pole Barn, 1.5 car garage and 2 car garage) all of various ages ranging from 1962 to 1999. The pole barn and 2 car garage are steel roof and pole barn style siding. The house and 1.5 car garage are the oldest buildings and they are 3 tab shingles with residential steel siding about 20 years old.

So we called our insurance company and started a claim to get the inspector out just slipping in under the 1 year anniversary of the storm. I was there when the inspection happened and just got the report back and the approved the following work.

House - Full roof replacement, Siding on 2 walls, Leaf Guard Gutters, down spouts, deck, awning over one window and window well covers

1.5 car garage - Full roof replacement, Siding on 2 walls, outdoor yard light

Pole Barn - This has pretty thick steel roof so they couldn't find any dents. However new rain cap on my chimney for the wood stove.

2 car garage - Some trim was the only thing noted.

I was working with a contractor and they took a sample of the residential steel siding and sent it off to a lab. In Minnesota if you have siding damage the insurance company can can get away with replacing only the damaged side if the siding doesn't match now or if the original siding is still available. The contractor said that steel siding changes up every 8 years or so. Ours is at least 20 years old so he said they will have to do the entire house. We are waiting on the report back right now. Everyone we have spoken with has said the entire house will be done as well as the 1.5 car garage.

So in talking with my wife this changes things a bit for us. The next home remodel project on the to do list was to update the kitchen. That project was going to include replacing the 2 windows in there with the knowledge that we have about 20 windows that are nearing end of life and due for replacement. Not to mention the front door. We were going to do windows as we worked around the house addressing a room at a time. However with the siding coming down, now is a better time to address all the windows at once and front door. Also further down our list of projects on the house was to get rid of the tuck under garage which we never use. The door opening is only 6.5' tall so the truck doesn't fit there so it is useless and a waste in heating in the winter because it isn't insulated that well. Then I would like to add an attached 3 car garage off our porch. In talking with my wife she agreed that this would be a good addition. It also makes sense to do it now because the roof will tie into the existing roof on the house and then the siding will tie in. My wife is an architectural drafter and works on new construction custom homes. So she has been working on plans for the new garage. I have a buddy that is a structural engineer at a big engineering firm so we are going to be chatting. We are not in a rush to close off the tuck under garage unless the city makes us do it with the new construction of the attached garage on the back of the house. It will mainly be storage/office space. The basement is all block wall so we can figure out how we will do that work later. The current projects on the house are going to be expensive enough. While we have a pretty sizable insurance check, it is just a drop in the bucket in the big picture on the construction costs we are looking at.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Where we stand right now.

This past weekend we went to a showroom for Renewal by Anderson Windows. We really like the idea of a composite core. There are several brands out there that offer something like this each with their own name. In Anderson they call it Fibrex. While one of the big benefits of going with Renewal is that they can come in and install new windows without messing with siding, which kind of goes away being we are messing with siding, the other benefit is that my wife really wants glider windows. The style that slides side to side to open. We currently have casements. The problem with the casement windows is partly that they are old and heavy but the mechanisms on several of the bigger windows have broken or are really hard to operate. Gliders have issues as well but most of that is with the wood core warping which isn't an issue with Fibrex. We have a rep stopping out Thursday to go over options. We will likely get the front door done at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For the siding, still waiting on confirmation on if the entire house is going to be replaced or not. That might impact the window decision. Anyhow we have 20 year old residential steel siding today. As mentioned my wife does drafting on new construction and she mentioned she really like Hardie Board siding vs Steel. In looking at Lowes which carries Hardie Board but not Steel and Menards which carries Steel but not Hardie Board, it looks like material costs is going to be close to a wash. I suspect installation costs may be a bit higher on Hardie Board compared to steel siding but that is a guess.

Anyone have Hardie Board and have any comments on the quality of it compared to a steel siding. I do have some pretty good dents from kicking up a rock here and there with the mower. I suspect the cement board is less likely to get dented by hail.

The contractor we are working with did say they would do a full wrap on the house if all siding was being replaced. We haven't asked if they do Hardie Board yet.
 

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Although I am a fan of cement board siding, remember it is low maintenance not maintenance free. Eventually, it will need paint or some other surface coating. That may not concern you but it adds to the overall cost of ownership and should be considered when making your final decision. Many people are surprised when I tell them to figure $5,000 to $15,000 10 to 15 years down the road for refinishing. The manufacturers will tell you 25 but I think 15 is more realistic. For durability, you can't beat it but a quality steel counterpart is also a great choice and maintenance free. I wouldn't consider the two a wash in price points. In my area, cement board can 30 to 50 percent higher than steel.

As far as hail is concerned, the newer steel is better than it was 30 years ago but it will still dent from rocks or hail. Either will do well but I have yet to see a catastrophic failure of cement board from hail damage.
 

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Where we stand right now.

This past weekend we went to a showroom for Renewal by Anderson Windows. We really like the idea of a composite core. There are several brands out there that offer something like this each with their own name. In Anderson they call it Fibrex. While one of the big benefits of going with Renewal is that they can come in and install new windows without messing with siding, which kind of goes away being we are messing with siding, the other benefit is that my wife really wants glider windows. The style that slides side to side to open. We currently have casements. The problem with the casement windows is partly that they are old and heavy but the mechanisms on several of the bigger windows have broken or are really hard to operate. Gliders have issues as well but most of that is with the wood core warping which isn't an issue with Fibrex. We have a rep stopping out Thursday to go over options. We will likely get the front door done at the same time.
Low quality casements can be a pain; but any kind of sliding window (e.g. single/double hung, slider) is less energy efficient because of the way the seals work on each type, and they can get all sorts of crud in the lower track that could hamper smooth operation.

Based on what I've heard about fiberglass windows, that's what I would probably use for new or remodel work. Since the siding is coming off, putting 'new,' not 'remodel' windows in would be a smart move.

Andersen has been around a long time.
 

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2 years ago we went with a vinyl replacement window that is a triple pain heavy vinyl and a woodgrain finish on the inside. One of the estimates from one of the major companies was for the "gilder" Windows. We had casement windows that were 24 years old but we decided on the normal double hung style. We are very happy with our windows and quite surprised by the saving on heating and air conditioning. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Although I am a fan of cement board siding, remember it is low maintenance not maintenance free. Eventually, it will need paint or some other surface coating. That may not concern you but it adds to the overall cost of ownership and should be considered when making your final decision. Many people are surprised when I tell them to figure $5,000 to $15,000 10 to 15 years down the road for refinishing. The manufacturers will tell you 25 but I think 15 is more realistic. For durability, you can't beat it but a quality steel counterpart is also a great choice and maintenance free. I wouldn't consider the two a wash in price points. In my area, cement board can 30 to 50 percent higher than steel.

As far as hail is concerned, the newer steel is better than it was 30 years ago but it will still dent from rocks or hail. Either will do well but I have yet to see a catastrophic failure of cement board from hail damage.
As I mentioned I priced it out. Just looking at the siding not trim as I was only looking for a rough ball park of is it 30-50% higher, roughly the same or less. When I went to Menards which had the steel siding and Lowes looking at 12' sections of both.

Menards has steel on sale right now for $10.99 but regular price is $15.99

At Lowes they have the Hardie Board which the price depends on the color. It ranged from $7.92 to $17.38. Most of it averaging in the $9-12 range. I only saw one color that was in the $17.38 price. Not sure why it was so much more than the others.

I am a vet so at Lowes I could also get 10% off the price.

I did talk to my contractor and they said they can install Hardie Board if we want to go to that. He mentioned another product that I hadn't looked at before. LP Smartside It is a wood based composite. They do both or steel, vinyl and such. I don't know much about the Smartside but it looks like it has a 50 year warranty vs the 30 on the Hardie Board.

That is good to hear on the finishing every 10-15 years. My wife was looking at it from the point of Hardie being finished at the factory so there would be no maintenance. That may not be the case. With the Smartside, I haven't looked at it much but I wasn't seeing a color sample so that might also have to be finished initially and then every so many years.

The contractor is going to check and see what the difference in cost will be. I suspect labor will be more.

The main thing I don't want is vinyl where you get holes if there is an impact.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Low quality casements can be a pain; but any kind of sliding window (e.g. single/double hung, slider) is less energy efficient because of the way the seals work on each type, and they can get all sorts of crud in the lower track that could hamper smooth operation.

Based on what I've heard about fiberglass windows, that's what I would probably use for new or remodel work. Since the siding is coming off, putting 'new,' not 'remodel' windows in would be a smart move.

Andersen has been around a long time.
My in-laws both are retired from Anderson. We live about 5 miles from the main factory in Bayport.

My wife is really doesn't want casement. We have had issues with them. The ones in the house right now are coming up on 20 years old which is a factor. They are high end Anderson windows that my In-laws put in. We bought the house from them when they retired and bought a place in Florida. I would say the windows that are the biggest problem are the ones in the porch. They are very big triple pane windows so they are very heavy. Luckily they are reachable from the outside because you have to push on them to close while someone cranks. Now most of these windows will just be going away as they are on the wall that will become the point where the garage connects to the house. There are 3 of them that will remain and will be replaced with something else. They may be smaller windows because we are planning on converting the porch into a mud room/laundry. Where the windows that will remain are now, we will likely want counter space.

So this kind of leaves glider vs double hung. My wife doesn't like the horizontal bar in the double hung. Glider still has the bar vertically. :dunno:

I want the garage more than I care about the windows. So by conceding a bit on the windows gets me some points to argue for a 30x40 garage.

We have discussed the new construction vs remodel. I kind of mentioned this in an earlier post above. The big advantage of remodel is not messing with the siding. Renewal by Anderson does windows a couple different ways. If the sills are good they can just replace the glass I guess. We want it all gone and go down to the rough opening. That means new trim outside and in. Sounds like a new construction window at that point. So we looked at Anderson Architectural A Series windows. However we really want the Fibrex which is a composite material. However they are only available in double hung and casements. So back to that issue. She wants gliders. If we go with Renewal we can get gliders in Fibrex.

I do know it will be cheaper to do new construction and most of the benefits of remodel windows don't apply. However another factor is that they have offers through them that simply are not available other places. Remember none of this work was really planned. They have a sale going on now for 0 down, 0% interest for 2 years and 30% off the project. I am sure it will be cheaper to go to Home Depot and order those Architectural A Series but again Fibrex isn't an option in what she wants and we would chew through most of the savings in interest.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
2 years ago we went with a vinyl replacement window that is a triple pain heavy vinyl and a woodgrain finish on the inside. One of the estimates from one of the major companies was for the "gilder" Windows. We had casement windows that were 24 years old but we decided on the normal double hung style. We are very happy with our windows and quite surprised by the saving on heating and air conditioning. Good luck.
Yeah while double hung and gliders are going to be less efficient than casements, it will likely be better than what we have today.

The biggest thing that will save us is getting rid of the tuck under garage. That will likely be a bit down the road but that is probably our biggest heating and cooling loss. There are many issues with that which is why we don't use it. The obvious is that even though the door is insulated it isn't as well insulated as a wall. The bigger issues are that there is an access door. As I mentioned the garage door is only about 6.5'. So that means the track is low. Too low for a 7' access door so the people that built the house just cut the corner off the access door. There is a storm door there but there is also that 6"x 6" cut out of the top corner of the door which is only wood. Of course with most tuck under garage styles like that, the bedrooms are right above the garage. So in the winter it gets quite cold in there. Well they decided to get some heat in there garage by putting a few vents in the duct work. So even if we parked in there, when you start a car the exhaust goes up into the bedrooms. :banghead:

Yeah that garage just needs to go away. This is why we don't use it for anything but storage.

Not only will my heating bill go down once that is all eliminated, but the new one will have an insulated floor and in-floor heat and I will likely not heat the pole barn as much as I do today.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Here are some sketches that I put together just to get an idea. The room off the garage is the existing porch which we will tie into.

The only complaint my wife has at this point is how much deeper it is than the porch. We can't match up the porch size because it is only 21' on the outside. So that would give about a 20' deep garage. We thought about centering it on the porch but the way the driveway comes up along side the house, we wouldn't have enough room to make the 90 deg turn to pull into the garage. We need to push it back, so it makes sense to just continue the wall from the porch to be the front wall of the garage.

This is the only photo of the area that I could find. You can see the end of the house and the three windows of the porch which will remain but may be reduced in size. The photo is looking down the driveway to the street. We park around back of the house right now next to the pole barn.





 

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Your story reminds me... 7 years ago we had some typical springtime Ohio weather which stirred up some pretty big storm. The hail bypassed the place I am now (we had just moved in a few months before this) but hit the neighborhood that I used to live in really bad. I still owned a house there. About every house in a 4 miles square area was getting a new roof. The house I owned also had vinyl siding which got holes in it from the hail. Like you, they couldn't match the siding, so it was all replaced along with the roof. All in all - about $26k for the repairs!


Back to your metal roofing/siding though - have you considered anywhere except the big box stores. We have a place not too far from here that supplies the builders of metal buildings. They actually do the manufacturing of the siding there. More choices than Menards in colors, etc. Plus, they also have the knowledge to help you pick out materials. I spoke to them about a project I was working on earlier this spring and they were super helpful. You might look around for a similar place in your area.

Good luck to you on this! It sounds like your insurance company is coming through for you! :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Your story reminds me... 7 years ago we had some typical springtime Ohio weather which stirred up some pretty big storm. The hail bypassed the place I am now (we had just moved in a few months before this) but hit the neighborhood that I used to live in really bad. I still owned a house there. About every house in a 4 miles square area was getting a new roof. The house I owned also had vinyl siding which got holes in it from the hail. Like you, they couldn't match the siding, so it was all replaced along with the roof. All in all - about $26k for the repairs!


Back to your metal roofing/siding though - have you considered anywhere except the big box stores. We have a place not too far from here that supplies the builders of metal buildings. They actually do the manufacturing of the siding there. More choices than Menards in colors, etc. Plus, they also have the knowledge to help you pick out materials. I spoke to them about a project I was working on earlier this spring and they were super helpful. You might look around for a similar place in your area.

Good luck to you on this! It sounds like your insurance company is coming through for you! :good2:
I don't know that I would be buying the siding and other materials anyhow. The plan right now is to just go through the contractor but we haven't discussed numbers yet. We are still in the assess damage phase. The only reason I went to the box stores is to get a ball park cost. I wanted to know how much more a cement board product would cost vs steel. I was kind of shocked to find that it was cheaper. While I would like to get this all done this summer. Realistically I think this will drag out probably into next year.

We have been happy with our insurance company (USAA) but this is the first claim we have ever had. We already have a check minus the deductible. A big part of that is the garage. We just paid off the 2nd mortgage. So we will be taking out another or a HELOC to fund the garage build. I want to get that in before the rates go any higher. I am thinking about getting about $60K for the project. I plugged the garage into an estimator for materials and it was about $18K. That was as an insulated detached garage where this is attached so that saves a bit. However that didn't include electrical, the slab, apron and driveway because we will likely also tear up our asphalt driveway and replace that. Even if we can get it built and I can insulate, drywall and finish it off later I would be happy. I can live without heat out there for a year or so. We just need to get the structure up so it can be sided and the roof on it with the rest of the house.

Then we need to get the city to approve all this. I think we are fine because it is attached.
 

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I was going to suggest looking at Marvin and Pella's offerings; but since your in-laws retired from Andersen, I suspect there would be hell to pay if you went with another brand.
 

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Haven't updated this in a bit.

Last Thursday we had Renewal By Anderson out. The salesman was, well interesting. I have to say I don't think I have ever met a salesman like this... As we went through the house he was actually talking us out of buying windows. So right now on the quote we have 5 windows (openings) and the front door as well as the side window thing. I don't know about the price. It is less than I thought to a point but that is largely because it is a lot less windows than we were planning. For instance we have a 10' bow window. He looked at it and said he could replace it. The cheapest option would be a picture window with a glider on each side. However that would be way more expensive than just going to Home Depot and buying the sashes. The window was new enough that it could be upgraded to 2018 standards for way less than any other option. He even told us which HD to go to and who to talk to because they would know the Anderson line. In all the quote came to something like $13,800. The special they are running now will finance it for 2 years at 0%. Pretty sure we will pull the trigger on this.

Yesterday we had my buddy out who is a structural engineer. We sat down going over plans and have a few ideas. I spoke to a builder and he is going to call the city tomorrow for us and see what they say. He thinks we are fine because it is an attached garage. I explained where we are at with the plans and he said that would speed up the process since we are 90% of the way there. I emailed him the plans and we discussed on the phone. He punched everything into their estimator and came up with a ball park cost. So the building with infloor heat, insulated, 10' walls with 2x6 studs to add more insulation and 1100sq ft of cement for a patio behind the garage and the apron, he said he was thinking it would be $55-60K.

I guess that is pretty close to what I was thinking. Of course I really wanted it to be in the $40s but for what we are looking to do, it doesn't shock me much. Next will be to decide if we go 10' walls or bump to 12' walls since we are going 2x6 studs anyhow.

We have had more discussions on siding. Leaning toward steel for everything right now.
 

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I guess that is pretty close to what I was thinking. Of course I really wanted it to be in the $40s but for what we are looking to do, it doesn't shock me much. Next will be to decide if we go 10' walls or bump to 12' walls since we are going 2x6 studs anyhow.
As an architect friend likes to say, "Space is cheap." I'd go with 12' or taller walls if you can afford it as it's nice to be able to stand a stick of lumber or conduit on end and not hit the ceiling.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
As an architect friend likes to say, "Space is cheap." I'd go with 12' or taller walls if you can afford it as it's nice to be able to stand a stick of lumber or conduit on end and not hit the ceiling.
A little more back story on the 10' vs 12'. Ideally yes I am inclined to lean toward 12'. It isn't going to add a lot to the cost. We are already going 2x6 studs which is the biggest part of the costs add and I want to say he thought it might add only $1500 to go from 2x4 to 2x6. Here is the issue. If it was a free standing garage or my only shop I wouldn't even entertain 10' walls. The biggest issue is I am trying to avoid what I have today. There are two major issues with the tuck under garage that we have today on the house. I think I mentioned the first problem which is the door is only 6.5' tall so my wife's truck doesn't fit. The other problem is the apron is actually sloped toward the garage. We get snow melt in the winter which builds up ice in front of the garage so every spring we are battling that or we get 1" of water in the tuck under garage because it is sloped the wrong way. We are going to tie into the existing porch and driveway. To do 12' walls we are going to have to dig down. Depending on how that lines up with the roof of the house, that my mean the apron will slope toward the garage. I don't want to do that. It kind of comes down to what pitch we have on the roof. We can get pretty deep snow loads so we have to account for that and we haven't decided if we are going with custom trusses or standard ones yet. That will impact price. The fact is that I have a pole barn with 12' walls which is my shop today and will remain my shop for things like welding, wood working and such. The primary role for the new garage is parking. I will have tools in there but most likely I won't do much out there other than motorcycle maintenance. Car/truck work will be done in the Pole barn since that is where the lift it. My motorcycle lift will move to the 3rd stall. While my sketch showed a 3 series tractor in there along with my car and my wife's truck, that was just for sizing estimates. I am leaning toward a 3 series to replace the X585 a few years from now and in the winter it will probably look like that. Summer months, the motorcycles will be in the 3rd stall and the tractor and ZTrak will always live either in the pole barn or one of my other two detached garages.

While I wouldn't really need the garage height for working on boards and such as you mentioned, that is with today's intended use. Who knows what I want to do out there 5-10 years from now? I get that. The pole barn is about 15' away from the new garage so it isn't exactly a hike to get out there. Where the 12' would be nice is maybe I want to add another lift to the new garage. I am going to map out the loops to account for a 2 post in the middle bay. If nothing else it is more wall space for taller cabinets or shelf space. I mentioned that to my wife and she just rolls her eyes and says we have 3 other buildings. How much more storage do you need? It doesn't help that the garage project just shoehorned its way in front of her needed kitchen project.
 

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...I did talk to my contractor and they said they can install Hardie Board if we want to go to that. He mentioned another product that I hadn't looked at before. LP Smartside It is a wood based composite. They do both or steel, vinyl and such. I don't know much about the Smartside but it looks like it has a 50 year warranty vs the 30 on the Hardie Board.

That is good to hear on the finishing every 10-15 years. My wife was looking at it from the point of Hardie being finished at the factory so there would be no maintenance. That may not be the case. With the Smartside, I haven't looked at it much but I wasn't seeing a color sample so that might also have to be finished initially and then every so many years...
I have used Smartside on two houses but only for trim. We did paint it before installing (it comes primed) and I am sure it will need to be painted every 5-10 years. It is a LOT easier to work with than cement board. I have zero experience with their siding products.
A contractor I know decided to drop a piece in a bucket of water and left it there for 6 months. It was still fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Time for another update.

Since the last one we had another builder out on site to look at things. We went over the drawings and everything we want to do. His estimate was $60-80k. As for the side walls, he said they would be about 11.5'. It is a balancing act between how much excavator work we want to pay for which is expensive and the slope of the apron from the garage to driveway. It is going to bee too flat if we went any taller on the sidewalls unless we raised the side walls on the porch. I am good with 11.5'.

As I mentioned before we have a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) but paid that off today. I need to call the bank and have the account closed. The odd thing is my bank doesn't do them anymore yet I have to call to close it. They wouldn't let me use it when they decided to not offer it anymore and the available balance was always $0 as we made payments. We are debating on if we do a Equity Loan which as lower interest rates or another HELOC with another bank. While a HELOC will have higher interest rates, we figure we will have this paid off in 2-3 years and we are going to remodel the kitchen next. It would be nice to not have to take out another Equity Loan, we could keep working off the LOC. We are going to try and run down to the bank this week at some point.

I spoke with the first builder who spoke with someone from the planning department with the city. He was saying that in our town they do not have a house sqft to garage ratio limitation. I could build a 10,000 sqft garage if I wanted. As long as it is attached. However we are over on buildings and they were telling the first builder that we would have to tear down two of our accessory buildings. I told him this isn't right and they are grandfathered in. He asked if I had anything in writing. Nope. So I got in contact with the building inspector for our city. He confirmed my thoughts. As long as we are not working on the accessory buildings they can remain. I explained that they have hail damage and are being worked on. He said that repair work is fine as long as they are structurally sound. Yep they are. He also confirmed that we are fine with attached garages. We can keep the tuck under and build the new one if we want. The tuck under will still go away but that will be a later on down the road project.

So far I have only spoken to the first builder on the phone. I want him to come out and actually put boots on the ground and get a good estimate. He was at $55-60K but I was short on my cement estimate. The second builder that has been on site said $60-80k which I suspect is more accurate. The first builder said he can't start anything until late August into Sept at best. Provided he can get cement guys. The first builder is a bigger company and I suspect they may have their own crews. I am not sure. They seem less willing to split out portions of the work. For instance if I want the hail damage company to do the entire roof of the house, porch and garage and siding. The second guy said that he didn't care if I wanted to general this. Just let him know what parts I wanted to take on and he will deal with the rest. He did warn me that if something isn't done as expected or to his standard that it may cause delays. He also said he doesn't do roofing or siding. He is going to sub that out anyhow so if I do it or him, it doesn't matter. Also being that is at the tail end it won't impact his schedule much. The first builder wanted his crews to do everything. When I asked about the how this would work being that some of the shingles and siding is being paid for and installed by the insurance company. He said they can calculate how many sqft they do and that we could get a credit for this. But that means potentially two crews trying to side and shingle at the same time. That sounds like a mess. So I am leaning right now to the second builder.

I have been asking around about the first builder. I have been getting a lot of comments that they are mediocre. It is worth noting they have been building garages for a long time and this is mainly what they do. Much of this reputation is from the 50-60's when they were known to come into neighborhoods and slap up cheap, basically pre-fab garages for homes that were build without them. Being this is a custom job and they don't do that anymore has be less concerned about it. I will wait to pass judgement until I can meet with someone there.

The second builder has had good references. I have a few buddies that have worked with him. From what I have found out his framing skills are great they just said the trim work and finishing isn't the best but that also is stuff that he many times subs out. I have a buddy that has been doing finish trim work and I could sub that out to him. Also it is a garage not a kitchen or living room so it isn't like we are going to have mop boards and a lot of fancy details. It is going to be trim work around the garage doors and such. Heck I might do that myself and save a few bucks.

I did tell the wife that I want to look into LP Smartside a little bit more. There will be some benefits such as being able to match it later down the road if we change anything else on the house or whatever. The concern was painting it. We are not getting any younger but the side that will see the most fading is also single story so it isn't like we are up on a tall ladder.
 

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I put LP SmartSide on my shed when I built it. I would use this stuff again without question. It comes in standard colors or you can have it pre-painted any color you wish if you are willing to pay for it.

I am a licensed and registered Structural Engineer (SE license) in 8 states and a licensed and registered Professional Engineer (PE license) in 8 states, too. My specialty is cementitious materials. I know you live in MN and I am licensed here if you need some advice.
 

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I don't know that I would be buying the siding and other materials anyhow. The plan right now is to just go through the contractor but we haven't discussed numbers yet. We are still in the assess damage phase. The only reason I went to the box stores is to get a ball park cost. I wanted to know how much more a cement board product would cost vs steel. I was kind of shocked to find that it was cheaper. While I would like to get this all done this summer. Realistically I think this will drag out probably into next year.

We have been happy with our insurance company (USAA) but this is the first claim we have ever had. We already have a check minus the deductible. A big part of that is the garage. We just paid off the 2nd mortgage. So we will be taking out another or a HELOC to fund the garage build. I want to get that in before the rates go any higher. I am thinking about getting about $60K for the project. I plugged the garage into an estimator for materials and it was about $18K. That was as an insulated detached garage where this is attached so that saves a bit. However that didn't include electrical, the slab, apron and driveway because we will likely also tear up our asphalt driveway and replace that. Even if we can get it built and I can insulate, drywall and finish it off later I would be happy. I can live without heat out there for a year or so. We just need to get the structure up so it can be sided and the roof on it with the rest of the house.

Then we need to get the city to approve all this. I think we are fine because it is attached.


Just as an FYI, and it may be different in the states, but the big box stores basically have absurd pricing compared to wholesalers open to the public.

Example: 30 year shingles, $24 at Home Cheapo, $21 on sale. $16 at a wholesaler.
 
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