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At the risk of being redundant, I posed the query in another thread, as to whether or not anyone had ever made their own Corned Beef...but on second thought, I figured this would be a more appropriate place. So...Have any of the members ever made their own Corned Beef?

I have heard that you can make better corned beef at home than you can buy at the market.
 

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At the risk of being redundant, I posed the query in another thread, as to whether or not anyone had ever made their own Corned Beef...but on second thought, I figured this would be a more appropriate place. So...Have any of the members ever made their own Corned Beef?

I have heard that you can make better corned beef at home than you can buy at the market.
No, i've never made our own, but we did buy some by mistake for a party (thought it was just plain whole brisket)
smoked them for 11 hrs like any other brisket (we did soak overnight in beer first!)
and they came out amazing! :good2:
 

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Its a long process and takes up a lot of fridge room. the time I did it I smoked it with pepper rub after the bringing was done. That turned it into pastromani. it was very good.
 

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I work at a meat market that makes their own corned beef. There are several ways to cure your own corned beef.

The simplest is just water and salt, this produces a 'New England Style' gray corned beef. If you want a red corned beef (traditional Jewish deli style) you need to use Prague powder ( basically a pink salt).

You can use pretty much any cut of beef, brisket is the most common.

There are a lot of recipes on the Internet, google it and you will see!

The simple method;

A non reactive container large enough to hold the meat and enough water to cover. A plastic 5 gallon bucket works well.

Place water in bucket, stir in enough salt (kosher works best) so that when you put a whole egg ( in the shell) in the water it floats.

Trim some, not all, fat from brisket. Pierce the meat a bunch on both sides with a meat fork.

Put the meat in the brine, cover and refrigerate for 5 days. You can turn the meat every day to get a more even brining.

After 5 days remove the brisket, rinse it in cold water and simmer in plenty of water for about 3 hours. I add chopped onion,

Bay leaves and a bottle of beer to the water (after toasting to old friends and relatives 😉).

That should give you a tender and flavorful gray corned beef.

I have not done a red corned beef yet but it looks pretty simple.

Adding pickling spices would give you a nice pastrami to smoke, I want to try that too!

Now I am hungry and can't wait for St. Patrick's day!!!

Good luck and enjoy 🙂
 

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With beef it turns out really good. I like it more because you can adjust you spices to taste. Most recipies usually just call for pickling spice, but I like experimenting. I feel like this is the main benefit over store bought corned beef. I also do it without soduim nitrite sometimes to appease the wife, but it is better with it.

It's difficult with lean meats because they dry out easily when cooking. Started cooking them in the pressure cooker, which help a lot.
 
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