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Official "Groovie" Dude
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a red maple that a deer scraped last fall and pretty much killed it. Well everything from the scrape up died and is regrowing from the healthy trunk that is left. Question is can I cut the dead part off? Which would leave about a six inches trunk with the new growth coming off it. Would the stump just rot and killed everything?
 

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Senior GTT Super Slacker
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If it works you will probably end up with one ugly tree.
I've seen trees as you mention start out with new growth only to completely die a few years later.
How big is the tree?
A picture would be good if you can get one.
 

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If the tree is a specific part of a landscaped yard, I'd start over. If it's just a tree--not part of plan or design, I'd plant a new one maybe 10 feet away and let the old one do it's thing. Maybe it'll come through and be interesting. If it doesn't, you'll have a head start on a replacement.
 

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I've got the same thing going with a Japanese Lacewing Maple that was crushed by larger tree. There is vigorous growth from the stump. I'm think of cutting a couple, dipping into root stimulator and planting into pots. I should end up with a couple of young saplings that I can transplant next year. Even though slow growers, a miracle grow feeding program should get them a good start.
 

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I have seen small trees broken off like that, but some can be saved. The technique was to remove the dead part, and trim off all the other branches except the largest, most vertical one. The remaining branch grows and melds back into the main trunk and in a few years you can never tell the tree was damaged. I have done it myself with a...of all things...small maple about an inch and 1/2 in diameter. It eventually met its demise a couple years ago when we had one of our famous storms here.
 

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I'll second what 2Lane said, and what the county service forester told me. A stump sprout will grow into a strong and healthy tree. It has the advantage of already having an established root system. You should cut the stump at ground level and remove all but the dominant sprout. It will eventually engulf the old stump and you won't be able to tell it was ever cut. I have lots of tulip poplar trees that were logged 15 years ago, those stumps have grown very quickly into very large straight trees with no sign of the old cut stump.
 

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Official "Groovie" Dude
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Discussion Starter #11
2Lane and Interceptor thanks for the idea. Worst case would be it doesn't work. Nice to know someone has tried it and it worked.
 
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