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Completely forgot what it is. Mead is fermented honey and water. This old beverage is making a comeback. Though many producers are adding to the ingredients to make their own signature products.

Any of you guys/gals make your own?
 

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I don't. It has always been a seasonal beverage. I used to just buy it, when I was in college, when it was in season.
 

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I want to, since I have bees. Have not gotten enough honey yet to try it. Hopefully next year. I do buy some occasionally. Also, due to my medication, I can have very little alcohol. :cray:

Rich
 

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I want to, since I have bees. Have not gotten enough honey yet to try it. Hopefully next year. I do buy some occasionally. Also, due to my medication, I can have very little alcohol. :cray:

Rich
There's not much better than fresh,raw honey. Perhaps it's a little odd for me to post this thread, especially since I don't drink, but the fact that it is made from natural ingredients got my attention. The history of it sure goes back a long ways.
 

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A few of us have discussed it at work. A group of us make wine and beer, and mead is something no one has tried yet. I need to get off my butt and try to make a batch.
 

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Completely forgot what it is. Mead is fermented honey and water. This old beverage is making a comeback. Though many producers are adding to the ingredients to make their own signature products.

Any of you guys/gals make your own?
Actually, many producers add spices or fruit extracts because they suck at making actual mead. Correctly fermented, mead has a very good flavor to it. But, it is an exacting process. If you're not perfect, the taste isn't so good. So, to offset their screw-ups, producers starting adding other items for flavor that would mask their fermentation mistakes.

Make no mistake - some of the flavors are perfectly fine. But, they would be even better with a perfect mead "under them".
 

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never made mead, but make hard cider every year, except last year, spring frost took out all the apples.
 

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never made mead, but make hard cider every year, except last year, spring frost took out all the apples.
I want to make hard apple cider! How many bushels of apples will I need, when the next crop comes in? Is there a particular variety that is better than others?
 

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I want to make hard apple cider! How many bushels of apples will I need, when the next crop comes in? Is there a particular variety that is better than others?
Man, there is so much information on the internet;

https://www.google.com/search?q=history+of+hard+cider+in+the+us&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

Apparently hard cider was the mainstay of the U.S. until prohibition; nearly every farmer had an orchard and made hard cider. Prohibition nearly killed it, but it seems to be making a comeback. I had read this previously; people have always consumed a lot of alcohol. It seems that some apples are much better for cider, at least if you want to make a traditional hard cider using the heritage apples, but I'll leave that to the experts. Let us know how you make out with this endeavor FG; I would be interested in a blow-by-blow.

FWIW, I have a recipe for something called "Hooch"; I'll post it in the Cookbook thread if anyone is interested. It is wonderful; just don't let anyone know you have it.
 

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I want to make hard apple cider! How many bushels of apples will I need, when the next crop comes in? Is there a particular variety that is better than others?
I always have used golden russet, an old school apple that is not very popular any more. I have a cider mill nearby I work at in the fall so I have it easy there. You can make it with any apple, but the older ones have a better balance of sugars, acid and tannins.
How many depends on how much you want to make. I do mine in 50 gal. bourbon barrels do 100 each year.
 

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I always have used golden russet, an old school apple that is not very popular any more. I have a cider mill nearby I work at in the fall so I have it easy there. You can make it with any apple, but the older ones have a better balance of sugars, acid and tannins.
How many depends on how much you want to make. I do mine in 50 gal. bourbon barrels do 100 each year.
I don't think that I have ever seen that variety. I'd probably try just one, 50 gal. barrel, and see how it goes. Are you saying you make 5000 gallons of the cider each year?!?! I could aspire to that! :yahoo:

Do I want crisp like gala apples or granny smith, or more like golden delicious?
 

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I don't think that I have ever seen that variety. I'd probably try just one, 50 gal. barrel, and see how it goes. Are you saying you make 5000 gallons of the cider each year?!?! I could aspire to that! :yahoo:

Do I want crisp like gala apples or granny smith, or more like golden delicious?
100 gal. two barrels. way to lazy to make 5000. if/when you bottle, a barrel will fill aprox. 120 1.5 liter wine bottles.

A mix is a good way to start. how about baldwin, cortland, delicious gold or red, mac, jonathon, northern spy, use what you can get.

when I sarted I bought a book and used that to start. Sweet & hard cider by Annie Proulx & Lew Nichols. That was 20 or so yrs ago though not sure if its still available.
 

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I agree with Diggs, everyone I know who makes cider recommends a blend of various apples. For a lot of them the blend goes like this, "These apples have some bad spots and birds were pecking at them. Cut them up and toss them in the cider barrel." :lol:

fg,

You will be hard-pressed to find many russet apples anywhere except an orchard, and even then they would need to have varieties of heirloom apples. Russet apples have a dull skin color, and it usually isn't very smooth. The all-knowing mega-corporations have deemed any apple not shiny and smooth won't sell. My kids prefer the taste of russets over almost any other apple, so I have a few trees planted, but it will be another year or two before we get many apples form them.

Razors Russet is one of our favorites for flavor. They are on the sweet side (not overly sweet, I hate sweet apples), and crisp. Virginia Winesap has a nutty flavor, and Winter Joy has a spicy flavor. You can really change the taste of cider depending on the apples used.
 

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Mmmmmm! I'm going to have to try this when next Fall's apples come in. How many bushels (approx.) for a 50 gal barrel? Maybe I can drink my own hard cider and not MD at GTT DrinkFest 2015! :dance::thumbup1gif::mocking::fed:
 

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for 50 gal. you'll need a full bin which I believe is 25 bushel. Don't know what you have for cider mills, but 50 would be a major job by hand to grind and press. go to a local mill you'll want unfiltered and unpasturized.
 

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for 50 gal. you'll need a full bin which I believe is 25 bushel. Don't know what you have for cider mills, but 50 would be a major job by hand to grind and press. go to a local mill you'll want unfiltered and unpasturized.
Since apples don't grow well this far south, I'll have to look into this. I'm not sure that I am up to hand pressing 25 bu of apples! :drama::gaah:

And I always want unfiltered, unpastuerized ACV, and I buy it gallons at a time.
 

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start with a 5 gal carboy, be easier to handle and not out much if you don't like it.
It's alcoholic. Why wouldn't I like it? :mocking:
 

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You can do what my friends do. They mount a garbage disposal to a piece of old countertop, wire a plug and switch onto it, core the apples, and toss them in. Instant applesauce!
 

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You can do what my friends do. They mount a garbage disposal to a piece of old countertop, wire a plug and switch onto it, core the apples, and toss them in. Instant applesauce!
I've been wanting a quality food processor, by the time next apple season comes around, I may have an "excuse" to get one! :wink:
 
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