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http://www.trade-a-plane.com/listing?id=1651072

Just pretty darn expensive to maintain, insure, and of course purchase.

The CAF I was involved with had one that Chance Vought restored and then they donated it in the early 1980's. Through the years there were a few mishaps that occurred to it. One time it made a landing in New Mexico with the wheels up. Another time it hit a fence. There was also the time that the engine quit immediately after take off. Somehow the pilot managed to turn around and land without crashing. That was a very close one. Each time, the group managed to get it repaired and back in the sky. It's no longer hangared in the area. Sure miss seeing it.
 

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http://www.trade-a-plane.com/listing?id=1651072

Just pretty darn expensive to maintain, insure, and of course purchase.

The CAF I was involved with had one that Chance Vought restored and then they donated it in the early 1980's. Through the years there were a few mishaps that occurred to it. One time it made a landing in New Mexico with the wheels up. Another time it hit a fence. There was also the time that the engine quit immediately after take off. Somehow the pilot managed to turn around and land without crashing. That was a very close one. Each time, the group managed to get it repaired and back in the sky. It's no longer hangared in the area. Sure miss seeing it.
I love those old warbirds. The Corsair was arguably one of the best, if not the best U.S. fighter plane of WWII. It had an interesting, if labored development. Engine problems, pilot visibility problems, difficulty landing on carriers, etc. If I recall correctly, it was used mainly by the Marines from land bases, until the British showed us how to land it on a carrier. It was very fast, and had a very high kill rate...something like 19 to one in the Pacific...not as good as the Hellcat, but respectable.

The Japanese called it "Whistling Death" because of the sound of the air through the oil coolers. There is also a book by the same name, "Whistling Death" written by the test pilot, Boone T. Guyton, who nursed it though its early development. It's an excellent book, and I recommend it highly. Known as the "Bent Wing Bird", for obvious reasons, and "Old Hose Nose" also for obvious reasons. The bent wings were designed to accommodate the 13 ft. prop and still be strong enough for carrier landings. The "hose nose" was the result of a redesign to accommodate a larger fuel tank. As you can tell, I love the Corsair!
 

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I don't know much about the Corsair, other than in general. I have always wondered, how are the wings held in the extended position, and what about all the flight surface controls and and the ammo path for the wing guns?
 

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I don't know much about the Corsair, other than in general. I have always wondered, how are the wings held in the extended position, and what about all the flight surface controls and and the ammo path for the wing guns?
It has been a while since I've been around the one that used to be kept locally. Don't recall the answers you seek at the moment.

A buddy of mine is a machinist and builds most of whatever special tools and accessories are needed by the local CAF. They recently needed a new prop puller. The DC–3 needs some work. Their old prop puller was made around WWII. It was tired and worn out. A new one was going to cost a minimum of $10,000 to have built. That was money the CAF didnt have. Everyone knew my friend could do it, but he wasn't so sure he could machine the larger pieces without getting hurt. They kept after him and asked him to at least try making one piece at a time. It cost quite a bit for the materials, but he saved them a lot of money and didn't charge for labor. He is very good at machine work.
 
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