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So I figured I would try my first attempt at making something. Far from perfect but I’m learning. This is a differential lock peddle for my 1025
 

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Wow very nice :thumbup1gif:
 

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So I figured I would try my first attempt at making something. Far from perfect but I’m learning. This is a differential lock peddle for my 1025
Ok, ok... how much?

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You don’t want to know how much. I’m sure if I had more experience it would have went quicker and if I started with a smaller block of aluminum.
Much easier to buy one from Kenny but I had nothing to do for a day so what the hell
 

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Termite,
Let me give you just one concern I have with your design and others similar-I've mentioned this before in some of the other homemade pedal threads so I'll do the same here. In all the tractors I looked at when designing this piece, I noted that the pedal went all the way to the floor, so I wanted my design to allow for that just in case that was needed for full engagement of the diff lock mechanism. So, just be sure there is a minimum amount of materiel on the bottom side so the pedal can go all the way (or almost all the way) down to the floorboard.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That was the first thing I checked and understand why you made yours that was. I have 1/8” at the bottom on mine and didn’t think it would be a problem. I will double check the linkage when I put it back on tomorrow. Waiting for the paint to dry
 

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Looks great. Even though it seems like aluminum would be easier to cut than steel once you start milling steel you will hope to never see aluminum again. It likes to melt and is gummy and takes a lot sharper or high helix tools than steel. Plus with steel you can weld in any mistake and recut.:laugh:

Seriously it looks very nice, just trying to be helpful.

No kidding on the how much if you count time. I make a lot of parts at home that take an hour where a modern machine would do in under 5 minutes.
 

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Great job! :thumbup1gif:
 

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Great looking , :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Looks great. Even though it seems like aluminum would be easier to cut than steel once you start milling steel you will hope to never see aluminum again. It likes to melt and is gummy and takes a lot sharper or high helix tools than steel. Plus with steel you can weld in any mistake and recut.:laugh:

Seriously it looks very nice, just trying to be helpful.

No kidding on the how much if you count time. I make a lot of parts at home that take an hour where a modern machine would do in under 5 minutes.
I did have the gummy issue but found that it was much better if I climb cut instead of the other way.

And thanks for all the compliments
 

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Very nice Termite. :thumbup1gif:
 

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First, I must say, "Great job in both design & machining."
Second, a little useless information:

"I did have the gummy issue but found that it was much better if I climb cut instead of the other way."

A little kerosene...or diesel fuel in a pinch...will work as a cutting fluid and help prevent the gumming...but keep a fire extinguisher handy just in case!

The "other way" is called conventional milling. When milling first began, most metals were cast iron & cast steel, both having a hard scale on the outside. Conventional milling cuts from underneath this scale and makes for better/longer tool life. Since this was the first way, they called it the "conventional" way of milling.
 

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Little tricks are never useless info and always look for better ways to do something. I remember an old timer said they use to use lard on aluminum but I never tried it.

Here is the finished product. Yes I know the paint will most likely come off but looks good for now.
 

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Little tricks are never useless info and always look for better ways to do something. I remember an old timer said they use to use lard on aluminum but I never tried it.

Here is the finished product. Yes I know the paint will most likely come off but looks good for now.
That turned out quite nice. :good2: I suggest you check out NYC CNC on YouBoob. John's channel is geared towards CNC stuff as that is how he makes his living; but he has a wealth of good information, especially machining aluminum as that is what most of his jobs seem to be. He also has a website that I haven't looked at; but based on his plugs for his site in his videos; there is a lot of information waiting to be tapped into.

You could always have it powder coated.

Nice job! I need something like that for my 2520.
Me Too for my 4200.
 
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