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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve seen a lot of beautiful work from the skilled hands of this forum. I’ll take advise or comments on which you’d prefer as the only 2 choices. I have a lot of trim work upcoming in the homes I maintenance. I’ll need to add/replace base, shoe, chair rail, door and window trim. Also standard wainscoting and 3/8” plywood as custom wainscoting. I’ll be using mdf, finger jointed pine and never rot plastic depending on home.

The easy thing would be for me buy a pancake compressor and use my current air 18ga brad and 16ga finish guns. I don’t really want to go that route due space constraints in my work truck, plus having air hoses and the compressor in the work areas. I’d like to carry just one multi use gun, and I have just enough space in my packout box. Plus I’m slightly obsessed in adding tools from the Milwaukee catalog. I’d love to have both but can really only justify a single purchase.

My worries are the 18ga won’t work for some of the planned 3/4” flat stock used as trim. Also concerned the 15ga nail will be too big and crack/chip/blowout the smaller products. If Milwaukee made a 16ga nailer, I wouldn’t have any issue, it’d be the best compromise. In the past I’ve had 18ga bend or not fully penetrate in the thicker woods, not had too many issues with my 16ga. We had to stop using my friends 15ga nailer years ago on moldings in his new house because of the splits an chips. We did 90%of the house with 16ga. The 15ga was tons better for doing hardwood floor start and finish rows.
 

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.....If Milwaukee made a 16ga nailer, I wouldn’t have any issue....
What do you mean if? Milwaukee does have a 16ga finish nailer, angled and straight

I have a 15ga and 18ga. The only thing I've used the 15ga for is 1" pine center bead tongue and groove hung overhead. The 18ga has been used for everything else
 

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My experience, which is brief, with battery powered finish nailers is that is was underwhelmed. This is with a Hitachi 18v straight finish nailer.

They work and it is nice to have no hose but they are slow. From trigger pull to the nail being shot has an oddly long delay. The time between nails is slow because of this.

The gun itself is heavier and larger than a pneumatic gun. For tight areas I found myself annoyed with the battery gun.

Battery life was good and it seemed to have enough power but I just wasn't thrilled with it overall. For small projects and quick jobs it's a good thing and convenient. For commercial or high volume work maybe not so much.
 

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I purchased cordless 18ga & 15ga finish nailers several years ago to trim out a house after the owners moved into it. I did not want to have to drag hoses around all of the furniture & boxes.
They worked, but they were slow and cumbersom. Both failed on the next job & I never replaced them. I have looked at buying new cordless guns, but I do not like the large size of them or the high price over air guns.

I use 15ga nails when nailing through drywall into studs. I have found that 18ga do not hold well for that. I use 18 ga brads for attaching solid materials together.

This is the compressor I use for finish nailers. It weighs about 25 lbs & is very quit.

https://www.rolair.com/products/air-compressors/hand-carry/ab5
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks! Duh I only looked at what HD had in stock.

What do you mean if? Milwaukee does have a 16ga finish nailer, angled and straight

I have a 15ga and 18ga. The only thing I've used the 15ga for is 1" pine center bead tongue and groove hung overhead. The 18ga has been used for everything else
Got a 16ga on order now. ?
 
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