Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking for a mini baler to work with my 1025R. I know some of those Italian-built ones will work, but they are rather expensive. I see Yanmar makes the YMRB32 that requires an 18HP PTO (which the 1025R does, barely) and weighs 734 pounds. So I'm assuming if I don't try to overwork the machine with too heavy windrows, I figure PTO power will suffice. But since it weighs 53 pounds over the stated lift capacity (According to JD specs) is it a deal-breaker or is there enough leeway with specs that the weight won't be a major issue? We're very flat ground and distance to the field isn't that far.

I'm assuming lift height isn't an issue with a 1025R? I know there are times I've been a little frustrated with the Limited Cat 1.

Thanks in advance for opinions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
900 Posts
I've been looking for a mini baler to work with my 1025R. I know some of those Italian-built ones will work, but they are rather expensive. I see Yanmar makes the YMRB32 that requires an 18HP PTO (which the 1025R does, barely) and weighs 734 pounds. So I'm assuming if I don't try to overwork the machine with too heavy windrows, I figure PTO power will suffice. But since it weighs 53 pounds over the stated lift capacity (According to JD specs) is it a deal-breaker or is there enough leeway with specs that the weight won't be a major issue? We're very flat ground and distance to the field isn't that far.

I'm assuming lift height isn't an issue with a 1025R? I know there are times I've been a little frustrated with the Limited Cat 1.

Thanks in advance for opinions!
I don't think you need to lift it? Looks like its a pull type baler just like the big boys. Edit; It is 3pt mounted.
Hay Tools 3 - Yanmar YMRB32 Compact Round Hay Baler for Hay Harvest - Yanmar Tractor - YouTube

Pretty neat little deal. One of the comments says it is right about $11,000 MSRP tho:munch:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Robnik

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,275 Posts
With a decent size tractor you could probably pick up a decent used baler for a couple thousand bucks.

$11k vs. $2k - that's $9k to put toward a larger tractor that would make running a baler a breeze.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
745 Posts
Can't fault you for wanting to use your tractor to do your own work, I mean that's why we buy them, right? Given the size of bale these little balers put out, I would try to find someone with a small square baler to custom bale my hay. They stack and handle easier than rounds.

Best of luck with your purchase!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Robnik and PJR832

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
252 Posts
I looked into the horsepower requirements of vintage square ballers and couldn’t find a model that the 1025r could comfortably power. But there are so many vintage tractors out there for cheap that I personally wouldn’t attempt to use the 1025 anyways. But it had been a long time since I bailed any hay and I’m unlikely to do so any time soon. I was really just curious, so I could have overlooked a model. I know that Messicks showed a BX pulling a square bailer, but I couldn’t figure out which model.

As to your question, It doesn’t look like the 3pt takes all of the weight so you should be fine. Remember that any quick hitch will move the weight backwards and adds weight of its own, but since it has its own wheels, that shouldn’t be an issue either.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: Robnik

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,825 Posts
If I were to go small this is as small as I would go.
https://www.smallfarminnovations.com/Product/3X3-Compact-Round-Baler/TRB910-Middle-Roll-Baler/910
But it's not as much about HP with a baler as it is about weight, if your ground is flat no problems, but if you have any hills you wouldn't want something pushing you. I think with a small tractor, even a 2R or 3 series you'd want something on a drawbar so you can offset and not have the tractor trying to straddle the windrows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
With a decent size tractor you could probably pick up a decent used baler for a couple thousand bucks.

$11k vs. $2k - that's $9k to put toward a larger tractor that would make running a baler a breeze.
Smart thinking :thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Can't fault you for wanting to use your tractor to do your own work, I mean that's why we buy them, right? Given the size of bale these little balers put out, I would try to find someone with a small square baler to custom bale my hay. They stack and handle easier than rounds.

Best of luck with your purchase!
Smart thinking:good2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
675 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Another thing to think about is your exhaust, a down exhaust is not recommended for haying. The hot exhaust could ignite the hay.
 
  • Like
Reactions: keane and PJR832

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I had thought about the larger tractor/cheaper baler idea, but it's a matter of storage for machines and of course, multi-tasking. I really don't "need" a bigger tractor for the chores the 1025R does. Namely, handling compost pile, occasionally using FEL for gravel, mowing, etc. So getting a tractor just for haying seems...excessive. Although the exhaust issue makes sense as a concern.

I do realize the small square bales are more space-efficient than mini-rounds. But as I don't intend to sell it (just to feed our animals) and have enough space in my hay mow, I figured it wasn't that important. I do know there's an Italian-built small square baler that almost works on a 1025R (I think it requires 20 HP on the PTO) but had been cautioned that while a compact tractor will make it work, the plunger beats the stuffing out of you on a machine that light. Hence the trend for mini-rounds.

I'm not sold on going this route. But as I do like the idea of having control over my own hay supply (quality & quantity) it was something to think about when it was -25 degrees outside. So thanks for the input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
1025R would easily handle a mini round baler.

These mini round balers require virtually no hp run. I actually own a MRB870 and I have no doubt a 15 hp pto tractor could easily run one. All the PTO is running is a pickup and a bunch of rollers.

I'll go ahead and list some of the advantages and disadvantages of these mini round balers.

Advantages:
1. minimal Hp to run
2. Extremely versatile. Can bale areas where getting a larger baler just isn't feasible. I've used mine to bale along fence lines, grass clippings in lawn and leaf litter. I even baled thatch from the lawn in the spring and used it for bedding for the chicken coop.
3. Simple maintenance. With a round baler you don't have to worry about knotters and keeping the baler in time. Keep the chains and roller bearings lubed and the twine cutter sharp and that is about it.
4. Extremely compact for storage. Takes up very little space. Roughly about the size of a large freezer.
5. Bales are kind of versatile. I've put compost in the middle of some spoiled bales and then used them to grow cucumbers as well as unrolled some between the rows of my garden for an organic weed barrier.

Disadvantages:
1. Narrow pickup width and shallow throat. The baler doesn't like large windrows. It will suck them up and bale them but it is slow and it seems to make a less dense bale when your feeding the baler at max capability.
2. Way slower than running a conventional baler since you have to stop every time the baler starts twining the bale whereas a square baler just keeps on spitting them out.
3. Round bales are a little awkward to stack.
4. Limited clearance of tractor straddling windrow

If I was to bale with a 1025r this is how I would probably go about things. First plan on baling often. Trying to cut waste high alfalfa or brome just isn't going to be an efficient venture. I would look at knee high as about ideal. Cut it with either your mid-mount with the chute up to disperse the grass or a 3 point finish mower. Then look at getting a belt rake to windrow it. The belt rakes are way better for small scale hay then using a wheel rake. Plus you can use it to rake leaves or dethatch your lawn as well as the capability for tedding. Tractor tools direct and Tar River are the only two sellers in the US I have found.

As for the mini round balers there are much more options out there then just a few years ago. A lot of places now you can get one for less then 6 grand. You can go on tractor house and go to round balers and look at brands star, ice machinery, tar river and Yanmar and they will all show the same baler just with different logo. Models will be MRB 850 and 870. 870 makes a little bigger bale and weighs about the same and used the same hp as the 850.

I will admit it is kind of fun doing your own small scale hay and if you 1040F your taxes you can depreciate the equipment over 7 years. But if you are looking as it as a huge offset to your current hay costs it just isn't efficient enough. If you are looking to put up over 300 small squares with it. It would be much more beneficial to go with larger equipment especially if you have the room in the field to maneuver it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,825 Posts
I had thought about the larger tractor/cheaper baler idea, but it's a matter of storage for machines and of course, multi-tasking. I really don't "need" a bigger tractor for the chores the 1025R does. Namely, handling compost pile, occasionally using FEL for gravel, mowing, etc. So getting a tractor just for haying seems...excessive. Although the exhaust issue makes sense as a concern.

I do realize the small square bales are more space-efficient than mini-rounds. But as I don't intend to sell it (just to feed our animals) and have enough space in my hay mow, I figured it wasn't that important. I do know there's an Italian-built small square baler that almost works on a 1025R (I think it requires 20 HP on the PTO) but had been cautioned that while a compact tractor will make it work, the plunger beats the stuffing out of you on a machine that light. Hence the trend for mini-rounds.

I'm not sold on going this route. But as I do like the idea of having control over my own hay supply (quality & quantity) it was something to think about when it was -25 degrees outside. So thanks for the input!
If you have to space and time, look into this, how can you go wrong. I've dug deeper into this place too, like parts supply and such, seems pretty legit.
TS Budget Package Tractor Tools Direct
 
  • Like
Reactions: DRobinson

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
That's sorta the same idea as a buck rake. Mule powered Buck rake in action. - YouTube Thought about loose hay but the problem there is storage. We have a hay mow but getting loose hay up into the 2nd floor loft without the trolley w/grapple hooks would be a lot of hand-lifting! (And probably a lot of hay in my face.) I know in drier climate some leave haystacks out all winter. But in colder, damper places that can mean a lot of mold if you don't get hay inside.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top