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I've got Red Garters (1954) on my recorded, but not yet viewed list. It's supposed to be a western musical spoof. I usually enjoy Jack Carson, but this puppy is only rated as 2 star, so...

The Grey (2011) Liam Neeson and other oil roughnecks crash in frozen wilderness and face a pack of wolves. Supposed to be a tense adventure, but didn't work for me - maybe because crash injuries and effect of cold weather were so underplayed. Critics: 3.0; me: 2.0

Show Boat (1929) So now I've seen all 3 movie versions of America's first musical. This one is mostly silent with some spoken dialog apparently added late in the production. Odd, but very little of the musical's score is used. This version completely omits the race issues that are significant parts of the 2 later remakes. Perhaps it's closer to the book version than the stage one? Was fun watching a familiar (to me) supporting actor, Joseph Shildkraut, in his younger days as the male lead. Film was believed to be lost for many years. IMO, only worth viewing if you're interested in film history. Critics: 3.0, me: 2.0
Interesting commentary on Show Boat; as for The Grey, I have had chances to watch it, but something about it just didn't excite me, so I passed.

I know I may have mentioned this before, but have you seen The Camerman? If so, I would like your opinion. If not, It's a 1928 silent flick starring Buster Keaton. I saw it late one night; and the print was absolutely perfect; clear and sharp, which is what caught my attention. I ended up watching it all the way through, and found it very entertaining, and hilarious. Buster Keaton at his finest. It's been many years and would like to watch it again, but I haven't found a free version except on the computer.

 

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Discussion Starter #582 (Edited)
I'm a huge Keaton fan and as good as the The Cameraman (1928) is, some of the trademark Keaton touches are missing because this was the first film that he made under a contract with MGM. Previously he had complete control over every detail of his films (writing, directing, schedule, location, props, etc.). The studio where he had filmed was being closed, so he signed with MGM against the advice of many - including Chaplin and Lloyd. MGM rejected all of Buster's story ideas and pushed one about newsreels to make a major stockholder, William Randolph Hearst, happy. Considering all of the barriers that Buster had to deal with, it's amazing that he was able to achieve this level of quality. Sad to say, but things went downhill rapidly after that. He was to say later that signing with MGM was one of the worst decisions of his life.

Can't remember which film it was, but there was a flick that copied some of the scenes from The Cameraman, probably a Red Skelton vehicle. Know I've seen side by side clips of one of Keaton's original routines & a Skelton copy - an almost perfect match. Buster did mentor Skelton, so not a shock.
 

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I'm a huge Keaton fan and as good as the The Cameraman (1928) is, some of the trademark Keaton touches are missing because this was the first film that he made under a contract with MGM. Previously he had complete control over every detail of his films (writing, directing, schedule, location, props, etc.). The studio where he had filmed was being closed, so he signed with MGM against the advice of many - including Chaplin and Lloyd. MGM rejected all of Buster's story ideas and pushed one about newsreels to make a major stockholder, William Randolph Hearst, happy. Considering all of the barriers that Buster had to deal with, it's amazing that he was able to achieve this level of quality. Sad to say, but things went downhill rapidly after that. He was to say later that signing with MGM was one of the worst decisions of his life.

Can't remember which film it was, but there was a flick that copied some of the scenes from The Cameraman, probably a Red Skelton vehicle. Know I've seen side by side clips of one of Keaton's original routines & a Skelton copy - an almost perfect match. Buster did mentor Skelton, so not a shock.
The skits with the monkey cracked me up.
Speaking of Red Skelton, if you're familiar with the dentist skit with Tim Conway on the Carol Burnette Show, I recall seeing Red Skelton do almost the exact same skit years before Carol Burnette.

Just watched one of the most bizarre movies I have seen in a long time...entitled The Tenant. Filmed in 1976 in Paris, It starred Roman Polanski as a guy who rents an apartment previously rented by a young lady who committed suicide. It started out slowly, but interesting because it was in Paris in an unfamiliar setting. It soon got weird, Like maybe Hitchcock on steroids. It should have been named They all Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest. Don't waste your time.
 

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Found a movie entitled Where the Boys are in my "recorded" stash. I didn't intentionally record it, but I started it the other evening. It wasn't what it was supposed to be; instead it was a 1930 Dogville Barkie movie, with trained dogs as the actors. Pretty corny by today's standards, but I guess they were a hit in their time. Here's an example:
 

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Discussion Starter #588
Airport 1975 (1974) George Kennedy is again Joe Patroni in this 2nd franchise piece that has Karen Black, a flight attendant, flying the 747 after a mid-air with a small plane. Yeah, THAT one. Charlton Heston heads the cast, but there's a ton of familiar names of the era as well. Not as good as the first Airport, but not bad. Love the score. Cool jet helicopter that I'd forgotten about when I saw this years ago. Critics: 2.5; me: agree.

Fire Down Below (1957) Wasn't sure what direction this movie was going to go when reading the cast: Jack Lemmon, Robert Mitchum, and Rita Hayworth. "The friendship between two tramp boat owners is threatened by the arrival of a beautiful and seductive passenger." Even after a few minutes, the tone could have gone from being a romp to drama. But having noted that the producers were Irwin Allen, the force behind many of the big budget disaster movies of the era, and Albert "Cubby" Broccoli of the James Bond films, it wasn't a surprise that this ended up being a drama with a disaster. Nothing really special pro or con about the flick except maybe that Lemmon wrote the title song. Critics: 3.0; me: 2.5.
 

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Think I'd have a better chance with Red Garters (1954). Couldn't take more than 90 secs of the clip. :LOL:
HA! now now--i thought the whole 2 minutes was cute. lol
Yeah, I didn't do much better.
i just thought boy them dog trainers was pretty darn good back then,, u knoow to get them to sit so still for that long and all. i liked it.
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i''ve watched a good many new movies, but jeepers i forget what i watch an hr later it seems
i still enjoy reading the comments on all of them-oh thansk
 

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Discussion Starter #591
Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964) An unbalanced, self-proclaimed medium (Kim Stanley) has her weak husband (Richard Attenborough) kidnap a child so she can rise to fame by "solving" the crime. Tense. Kind of reminds me of a British version of Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolff (1966) without the yelling as far as personality insight. Didn't much care for Wolff, so not too fond of this one either although it was well done. Critics: 4.0; me: 2.0.
 

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Watched this last night:

It's a tear jerker; moves rather slowly, but suitable for the whole family, especially when you're sequestered. A bit of a different role for Richard Gere, but he plays it well. Hachi...a dog's tale.
now that was indeed a great movie---we watched that a few yrs ago--was a good pick for the family
Dish has given me some of the movie channels to watch for free during this pandemic stuff.
been watching the hunting channel most evenings, but really they are reruns from several yrs ago when i had those channels and watched back then. but its still good
 

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Watched two movies this weekend. First was a movie entitled "Loss of a Teardrop Diamond". It was typical Tennessee Williams; a morbid, dark, slow moving story about a rich, spoiled Southern heiress and her quest to assure her inheritance and her place in society. The usual cast of sexually promiscuous, ambivilent and deviant friends. I give it a three on a scale of 10.

Second was the "classic" The Jazz Singer, with Al Jolson. In its day an time, it may have been great, but to me it seemed to be an overly dramatic vehicle to introduce talkie movies and display the "talents" of Al Jolson. Jolson impressed me as an arrogant, self absorbed ham; and as for talent, I will take Elvis, Merle Haggard or Sinatra any day. Rating? Don't waste your time.

Parting shot...I've certainly had my fill of melodrama for the week. Think I'll go watch MSNBC for awhile.
 
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