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We are soon moving to a larger home with a long dirt driveway and about 3-5 acres of grass area to mow. Total size is 10 acres of wooded, open and mixed areas, hilly. Driveway is "y" shaped; from driveway entry to house it is 850' long uphill and the other side is 450' on relatively flat road to an additional storage garage where the tractor will be parked. Since the house sits on a hill the mow areas slope down from the house with some additional 30' hills on both sides with about 1.5 acres of flat open areas where we may put in a 20'*30' garden (probably tiller in the future). Since I live in northern Michigan we also get a good amount of snow so the tractor will be used for snow blowing. 12" of snow and 2' drifts of either wet heavy or light powder snow are expected. The lawn isn't picture perfect, just your basic grass in sandy soil. Trees scattered around to mow around as well.

My initial budget was in the range of the 700 series (738/739 or 758). Pretty sure 4wd is going to be a must with snow blowing and the hill driveway. Started looking at the 1025r as it is not much more $$$. I don't have a need (currently) for a FEL but could see using one around the property in the future. Is it difficult to put one on the 1025r in the future if I did not get one initially? I have a full set of tools and prefer to do my own work when I can. Can the 700 series handle the snow blowing and tilling without too much wear and tear or should I stick with the 1025r? Given the total budget I'm also considering a cheap snow plow truck to clean the driveway and a less expensive mower for grass cutting, but then I'd still need something to till the garden with. I'm not too keen on maintaining a plow truck and a mower/tractor so I'm thinking a single machine for both duties.


Never owed a rider mower or tractor, we cut our current lawn with a hand mower. I am leaning toward the 1025r with 54" snowblower and 54" mid mount mower. We'll probably put a tiller on in the spring and perhaps pick up a box blade to help maintain the dirt driveway; or would just a basic blade work well for that?

Pretty sure a 1025r is in our future but would appreciate feedback.
 

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I think the x7 would do what you need, but with that acreage, I'd get the 1025r. Get the loader now. You may not think you need it, but you'll find lots of things up use the loader for once you have it. I live on 5.5 acres and use my 1025r with loader all the time.

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It's not difficult to add a FEL later, but what I'll tell you is you might as well get one if you can afford it. Even if you don't use the bucket that much a good set of forks on these tractors is so useful for things like moving large logs, placing stuff like mulch close to where you need it (in bags or with the bucket if you bring it in by the load).

That aside, if you get a tiller you're going to need the FEL for front end ballast. Unless you want to purchase a rack and weights to supplement it. If you put a 500+ lb tiller on the back of these things you won't really be doing a wheelie, but you won't have good front end traction to help you get up hills. Actually, since you said your property is hilly it could get a little hairy.

I live on a hill has well, 8 acres, about 3.5 that I mow (I have the 60" deck). The 1025R is a great machine. With a dirt driveway you'll probably wind up with a box blade at some point and you'll need the FEL for ballast on that as well.
 

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4 acres here, mostly lawn. Had an x730 and it was an awesome lawn machine but moved up to a 1025r and it's so much more useful with the loader especially when it comes to yard maintenance as I have a crapload of trees. Get the 1025r. You won't regret it!
 

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We are soon moving to a larger home with a long dirt driveway and about 3-5 acres of grass area to mow. Total size is 10 acres of wooded, open and mixed areas, hilly. Driveway is "y" shaped; from driveway entry to house it is 850' long uphill and the other side is 450' on relatively flat road to an additional storage garage where the tractor will be parked. Since the house sits on a hill the mow areas slope down from the house with some additional 30' hills on both sides with about 1.5 acres of flat open areas where we may put in a 20'*30' garden (probably tiller in the future). Since I live in northern Michigan we also get a good amount of snow so the tractor will be used for snow blowing. 12" of snow and 2' drifts of either wet heavy or light powder snow are expected. The lawn isn't picture perfect, just your basic grass in sandy soil. Trees scattered around to mow around as well.

My initial budget was in the range of the 700 series (738/739 or 758). Pretty sure 4wd is going to be a must with snow blowing and the hill driveway. Started looking at the 1025r as it is not much more $$$. I don't have a need (currently) for a FEL but could see using one around the property in the future. Is it difficult to put one on the 1025r in the future if I did not get one initially? I have a full set of tools and prefer to do my own work when I can. Can the 700 series handle the snow blowing and tilling without too much wear and tear or should I stick with the 1025r? Given the total budget I'm also considering a cheap snow plow truck to clean the driveway and a less expensive mower for grass cutting, but then I'd still need something to till the garden with. I'm not too keen on maintaining a plow truck and a mower/tractor so I'm thinking a single machine for both duties.


Never owed a rider mower or tractor, we cut our current lawn with a hand mower. I am leaning toward the 1025r with 54" snowblower and 54" mid mount mower. We'll probably put a tiller on in the spring and perhaps pick up a box blade to help maintain the dirt driveway; or would just a basic blade work well for that?

Pretty sure a 1025r is in our future but would appreciate feedback.
  • 10 acres
  • 3-5 acres of grass to mow
  • wooded area
  • Michigan
  • 450-850 foot dirt driveway
  • plan for garden
Man, that just screams SCUT with FEL/ballast, mower, snowblower or pusher, box blade, tiller, and 0% financing makes it scream even louder. As a budget-saver, you might consider the 1023E. I went back and forth between the 1023E and the 1025R and opted for the former (saving a few $$thousand), but I didn't need the mower. You'd have to look at the differences in the way a 1023E manages a MMM compared to the 1025R (I don't know what the difference is, or if it's significant). Otherwise, the differences are pretty negligible, and for me at least, not worth the expense.

You can put a cab on it. That would be pretty elegant, but that never appealed to me. I live in Minnesota, managing our considerable snow on an open-station for decades. Like most Minnesotans (and Michiganders), I have a lot of warm clothing. For the snowblower, I throw on my snowmobile helmet which eliminates the brain-freeze from the inevitable component of blowing into the wind.
 

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Running a snowblower with an open station tractor on an 850’ driveway in Michigan?

Not me - get a Gator with a cab or something similar for snow removal. Or as you suggested - an old plow truck.
 

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Sure you can add it later but it is cheaper and easier to get it with the FEL now. You can get 0% financing on that FEL now vs having to buy it outright if you do it later. Also resale on a 1025R without a FEL will be harder. I know I wouldn't consider buying one without it.

Can a X7xx take care of your yard needs. Sure. I have a X585 which is a 2002 model. This was before the renumbering so the equivalent machine in today's options would be a X738 with the only real difference being mine is older and has shift on the fly 4wd not all wheel drive.

I don't have as much land to mow. I cut 2 acres. Did that for many years with the X585 and a 54C deck. It has been retired from that use and mowing is now done with a Z950R. I am prepping to move up to a bigger tractor. Since I don't have the mowing needs it will likely be a 3025E.

We don't have as much driveway as you and it is paved but when you add in neighbors that I also clear, I probably move as much snow as you. I normally plow but I do have a blower.

If I were to buy a new machine now and needed mowing, front blowing and FEL it would be a 2025R or if that was too big 1025R. The 2025R is basically the same machine as a 1025R, just a little bigger tires and overall size.

You may say you don't need a FEL. You are saying that because you don't have one now. If you ever need to pull a cart around for stuff or use a wheelbarrow, you will quickly find the FEL is so much easier for all those tasks. Put some hooks on it now any heavy lifting you once did is now done by the FEL. I am looking at moving up to a 3025E because I want more lifting capability with a FEL than what my CTC FEL can do on the X585. I use it so much it really is a dedicated FEL machine now 9 months a year. The only time the FEL is off for a long period is in the winter when I am plowing. Once you get one you will wonder how your back survived life without it.
 

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I don’t know anything about snow or plowing.

Everyone on here has a tendency to talk you up in size, money, etc. Me too. The most sniveling that gets done on here is from the guys that started way too small and trade and flip three or four times and lose their shirt in the process. Don’t be that guy. 1. Be in it for the long haul. 2. With that acreage and your needs one machine may do a lot, though it won’t do everything perfectly. 3. Add to your fleet as you can. Trading for that next “perfect single” is a unicorn. 4. Figure out where you are going to store this good stuff. Rust is depressing if only superficial. 5. Take advantage of 0% and roll as many accessories, attachments, and 42# weights as you can into a package deal. Steel and shipping never gets cheaper. 6. Get the FEL, get some pallet forks. (Not the clamp ons). 7. Watch as many early Tractor Time With Tim videos as you can. Bill Burkhart and Ask Tractor Mike are good too.

1025R should be your minimum. Buy as much as you can afford and have room to take care of. With the right tools you will enjoy your time on your property.
 

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I don’t know anything about snow or plowing.

Everyone on here has a tendency to talk you up in size, money, etc. Me too. The most sniveling that gets done on here is from the guys that started way too small and trade and flip three or four times and lose their shirt in the process. Don’t be that guy. 1. Be in it for the long haul. 2. With that acreage and your needs one machine may do a lot, though it won’t do everything perfectly. 3. Add to your fleet as you can. Trading for that next “perfect single” is a unicorn. 4. Figure out where you are going to store this good stuff. Rust is depressing if only superficial. 5. Take advantage of 0% and roll as many accessories, attachments, and 42# weights as you can into a package deal. Steel and shipping never gets cheaper. 6. Get the FEL, get some pallet forks. (Not the clamp ons). 7. Watch as many early Tractor Time With Tim videos as you can. Bill Burkhart and Ask Tractor Mike are good too.

1025R should be your minimum. Buy as much as you can afford and have room to take care of. With the right tools you will enjoy your time on your property.
Many many stories on here just as you describe.

Buy it once and buy it right.

The proper way to buy/size a tractor is to first asses your needs. What do you need to accomplish? Once that is figured out then you choose the proper implements to do those jobs.

The last thing on the list is to size the tractor to the implements.
 

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You say that a tiller might be in your future.

Adding 3 pt and PTO to the x7 series is very expensive.

I'm with everyone else. Get the 1025r with loader from the start.

Tim
 

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What they said

As other's have said, get as much as you can up front. I got a good deal on a 2018 1025R with 120R loader and 260B backhoe. So glad I did. I can't believe how much use I'm getting out of everything. And as someone else stated, get yourself some forks. I'm really surprised how much I use mine. Best of luck with the new house and machine!
:bigthumb:
 

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with that much wooded area requiring grapple work, I would suggest moving on up to a 3 series. I have a 1025r but am backing it up with my 35 hp 4400. You need more loader pressure and more hp for mowing and you might want to consider a rear finish mower and rotary mower. I would think that Goodworks Tractor might be a good place to shop and maybe you could buy both size tractors. I really like the backhoe on the 1025R but it is too small for my 7 acres. I use a zero turn and a 6' landpride finish mower.
 

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I am a little familiar with plowing snow in Michigan. I assume your driveway is dirt and likely will remain dirt at 850 feet in length, perhaps adding crushed aggregate or similar stone over time. Snow blowers and rocks don't make a great match as you will be picking rocks out of the yard forever, not to mention possibly knocking out a window, denting a vehicle and its hard on the blower chute and shear pins over time.

Lots of people own a plow truck and then sell them because there are other ways to deal with the snow. Since you haven't owned a tractor before, you really have no idea just how much use you will get out of one. Here is what I would suggest;

- Definately a front end loader, so that rules out the X7xx series, not to mention you will spend more on an x7xx with a rear PTO and 3 point hitch than buying the 1025r.

- If you plan to use the entire 10 acres, you will likely want to mow parts of it often and other parts of it occasionally. That means the rear 3 point mower, such as the Frontier RC2048 rear mower.

- Definately get the 60" Mid mount mower and don't restrict yourself with the 54". An extra 6" of cut every pass adds up when mowing 3 to 5 acres, trust me......

- Pallet Forks for the FEL, you will use these to pick up limbs and debris and cut wood, move bushes, trim trees, move other implements, to help with landscape projects, you will be amazed how often you use them. They are my 2nd most used implement with my rear 3 point carry all being the first.

- Since you have snow to deal with as well as a 850 foot driveway, you might want to consider the rear 3 point blade for grading the driveway as well as plowing snow, to some degree.

- I would NOT suggest a snow pusher as you need to be able to angle the plow blade to push snow, especially when its wet and heavy. Snow pushers are good for parking lots and straight pushing of snow. Not ideal for an 850' driveway as you will spend a lot of time pushing piles straight off the side of the driveway. An angled blade, front or rear. My preference is front as trying to plow snow or even operate a rear mounted snow blower is not handy and requires you to be sitting sideways and facing backwards. Not for me.........

- Gators are handy for running around the property but they aren't any better at plowing snow than the tractor would be. If you have a budget for a tractor and a Gator, you would likely find some use for the gator, but it can't mow, it can't lift, it can't grade, it can't do many of the things you need to.

- If you haven't lived in the area where you are moving, you may want to have someone plow the snow for you the first winter so you can see really what to expect on your property. It might be prone to drifting, it might blow right across the open areas, each area is different. Also makes a BIG DIFFERENCE if your driveway is oriented North and South or East and West. North South Driveways get pounded with drifts, east west driveways mush less so, depending upon the nearby terrain.

- If you haven't operated a tractor before, you will be prone to under buying what you need. There are few faster ways to waste cash than under buying the machines and trading up or down to get what you really need. You may want to purchase a good low hour used machine so if you do have to trade up (or down, which isn't likely) you will get nicked a little less financially.

- If you plan on buying new, use Deere's 0% deal and roll everything into the purchase. You are going to need rear ballast for the tractor for plowing snow and FEL work and other uses, so get at least 8 to 10 of the 42# suitcase weights and the weight brackets either from Heavy Hitch or elsewhere. Often the dealer can roll this into purchase and finance deal.

- Plowing and clearing snow with the FEL bucket is painfully slow, it's the same issues as you would have with the SNow Pusher. So don't think the FEL will solve all of your snow clearing needs as that isn't likely to happen.

- Deere's 0% for 60 months means that your payment is $16.66 per one thousand dollars financed. If you spend 20 thousand, the payment is going to be in the $334 per month range. It doesn't take long to spend $20k when purchasing a new tractor and implement. $25k is $417 per month, $30k is right at $500 per month. It will take no time to reach $25k to $30k when buying the tractor, FEL, mid mount mower, read blade, ballast weight and brackets, pallet forks, and the options to plow snow. Go on the John Deere website and build your own and while these are retail prices and you can expect to pay less, you would get an idea of the total cost.

-In order to get the 0% for 60 months, the implements and equipment all have to be purchased new together. If you add pieces later, you will likely have to pay cash for them or use Deere's consumer finance which is similar to credit card rates and dramatically changes the cost.

A lot to think about. One thing for sure, you will find uses for the tractor you can't even imagine now. Since this all new to you, there is quite learning curve ahead of you. There is a lot of good advice out there while there is also advice which might not be the best for your situation. That's going to be part of the challenge, trying to imagine how you are going to use the equipment which you have no experience owning or using.

Just don't be tempted to go too small as some others already pointed out. Also, be careful with the John Deere models which use either a "D" series front end loader or the 3025e series machines and larger which use the "D" series FEL and also do not have a mid PTO to power mid or front implements. The versatility of the machine is important to be able to handle so many tasks, so don't get into a machine which might limit the ability to use either mid or front implements as it will hamper your mowing and snow clearing options, which are the two tasks you know you have to deal with.

Remember, there is no such thing as the "Stupid Question" as we all have to learn, so ask away.................
 

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I mow with both of mine. However, if I had to do it over again and considering the cost of adding a mower deck to the 1025R, I'd be more inclined to spend that money a dedicated mower.
 

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I am a little familiar with plowing snow in Michigan. I assume your driveway is dirt and likely will remain dirt at 850 feet in length, perhaps adding crushed aggregate or similar stone over time. Snow blowers and rocks don't make a great match as you will be picking rocks out of the yard forever, not to mention possibly knocking out a window, denting a vehicle and its hard on the blower chute and shear pins over time.

Lots of people own a plow truck and then sell them because there are other ways to deal with the snow. Since you haven't owned a tractor before, you really have no idea just how much use you will get out of one. Here is what I would suggest;
One side benefit. Not sure what he has for other vehicles but a truck is nice when you are in a rural area for running for provisions. Blowers can be good if you keep the shoes low to not suck up rocks. You will build a layer of ice on the driveway and not have an issue. If your driveway is prone to drifting you are better off with a blower. Personally I avoid using them because I don't have to. We are in enough of a grove that there isn't any drifting. The only time I mount the blower is if it is really wet heavy snow over 8" deep that I simply can't push because my X585 isn't heavy enough.

- Definately get the 60" Mid mount mower and don't restrict yourself with the 54". An extra 6" of cut every pass adds up when mowing 3 to 5 acres, trust me......
I agree unless trees are an issue. That was our issue. Then I bought a chainsaw. The Z950R now has a 60" deck and plenty of room.

- Pallet Forks for the FEL, you will use these to pick up limbs and debris and cut wood, move bushes, trim trees, move other implements, to help with landscape projects, you will be amazed how often you use them. They are my 2nd most used implement with my rear 3 point carry all being the first.
I would look at Artillian for this. Keeps the door open for a grapple which is equally if not more useful for the brush work.

- Since you have snow to deal with as well as a 850 foot driveway, you might want to consider the rear 3 point blade for grading the driveway as well as plowing snow, to some degree.
Box grader or better yet land plane would be better than a rear blade.

- I would NOT suggest a snow pusher as you need to be able to angle the plow blade to push snow, especially when its wet and heavy. Snow pushers are good for parking lots and straight pushing of snow. Not ideal for an 850' driveway as you will spend a lot of time pushing piles straight off the side of the driveway. An angled blade, front or rear. My preference is front as trying to plow snow or even operate a rear mounted snow blower is not handy and requires you to be sitting sideways and facing backwards. Not for me.........

- Gators are handy for running around the property but they aren't any better at plowing snow than the tractor would be. If you have a budget for a tractor and a Gator, you would likely find some use for the gator, but it can't mow, it can't lift, it can't grade, it can't do many of the things you need to.
If the Gator plows are like a ATV plow they are worthless. Can't get enough down pressure to be effective. Hydraulics are the only way I would go. I tried to do the ATV plow and leave the blower on the tractor so I didn't have to change over. That lasted two snow falls. It isn't hard to swap back and forth.

- If you haven't lived in the area where you are moving, you may want to have someone plow the snow for you the first winter so you can see really what to expect on your property. It might be prone to drifting, it might blow right across the open areas, each area is different. Also makes a BIG DIFFERENCE if your driveway is oriented North and South or East and West. North South Driveways get pounded with drifts, east west driveways mush less so, depending upon the nearby terrain.
Co-worker did this on his 6 acre property with a really long driveway. Well he also said the ATV would be fine. Nope found out what I told him first had. Had a buddy that had a plowing service help a few times. 1 ton trucks were getting stuck in his driveway. Because of drifting it didn't have to snow. He would be clearing snow every day that the wind blew. He went with a 2520 with front blower to get the snow further away and has figured out how to properly place snow fencing.

- Plowing and clearing snow with the FEL bucket is painfully slow, it's the same issues as you would have with the SNow Pusher. So don't think the FEL will solve all of your snow clearing needs as that isn't likely to happen.
Yeah I wouldn't bother with FEL. Maybe if you dropped the bucket and went with the FEL mounted blade with 3rd function to angle the blade. Other than that the FEL would likely come off for the quick hitch.

-In order to get the 0% for 60 months, the implements and equipment all have to be purchased new together. If you add pieces later, you will likely have to pay cash for them or use Deere's consumer finance which is similar to credit card rates and dramatically changes the cost.
While this is true, there are some attachments that other options could be better. Artillian for instance with a Pallet Fork and Grapple. The 0% will only work on JD and I believe Frontier stuff. That is where homework is needed to find out what bits are best from JD vs aftermarket.

Just don't be tempted to go too small as some others already pointed out. Also, be careful with the John Deere models which use either a "D" series front end loader or the 3025e series machines and larger which use the "D" series FEL and also do not have a mid PTO to power mid or front implements. The versatility of the machine is important to be able to handle so many tasks, so don't get into a machine which might limit the ability to use either mid or front implements as it will hamper your mowing and snow clearing options, which are the two tasks you know you have to deal with.
What is wrong with the D series FEL? For instance on the 3025E? I agree with you in that the 3025E isn't a good choice in this case because he will want a Mid PTO which is why I said 1025R or 2025R. The FEL on a 3025E (at least the new ones) have JDQA so you can still change over to pallet forks, grapples and other attachments.
 

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I mow with both of mine. However, if I had to do it over again and considering the cost of adding a mower deck to the 1025R, I'd be more inclined to spend that money a dedicated mower.
I agree 100%. In fact, I didn't even purchase a MMM with my 1 series and have never missed it.............Sure, the Zero Turn ONLY really mows, but it sure is extremely good and very efficient at what it does......:good2: I mow at least 3 acres every time I mow and the zero turn does it much faster and with the deep fabricated deck it has great lift and really cuts the grass properly reducing the clippings, etc.

I initially had a hard time buying into the "dedicated mower" camp and having another machine just for that purpose. I am extremely glad I went down that path and would strongly encourage others to consider it. I allows me to leave my FEL on the 1 series 99% of the mowing season which isn't a big deal to take on and off, but it is one less piece to store separately when its removed......plus with leaving the rear 3 point carry all on the 1 series when not using a different 3ph implement, it keeps the machine properly balanced front and rear when using it.
 

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I mow with both of mine. However, if I had to do it over again and considering the cost of adding a mower deck to the 1025R, I'd be more inclined to spend that money a dedicated mower.
That is why I bought the ZTrak and once it is paid off I will buy a bigger tractor. This way I could go with a 3E series get a bigger machine for less than the equivalent R since I wouldn't need Mid PTO. I can get by with my X585 for now. I am putting less hours on it now since it isn't used for mowing. The side effect of that is you need storage for more machines.

I quickly found out that owning acreage is expensive in many ways. A little rider like at Home Depot or Lowes isn't going to be up to the task and you will have a lot of money tied up in stuff to do it right.
 

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I agree 100%. In fact, I didn't even purchase a MMM with my 1 series and have never missed it.............Sure, the Zero Turn ONLY really mows, but it sure is extremely good and very efficient at what it does......:good2: I mow at least 3 acres every time I mow and the zero turn does it much faster and with the deep fabricated deck it has great lift and really cuts the grass properly reducing the clippings, etc.

I initially had a hard time buying into the "dedicated mower" camp and having another machine just for that purpose. I am extremely glad I went down that path and would strongly encourage others to consider it. I allows me to leave my FEL on the 1 series 99% of the mowing season which isn't a big deal to take on and off, but it is one less piece to store separately when its removed......plus with leaving the rear 3 point carry all on the 1 series when not using a different 3ph implement, it keeps the machine properly balanced front and rear when using it.
How does the saying go? If you have something that does everything it doesn't do anything really well. At least not as good as a machine that was designed to do that one specific task. As soon as you ask it to do more than one thing you have to start making compromises.

Not saying a 1025R would make a bad mower. It will cut grass. But you are not going to be able to cut the greens at Agusta. Heck, not even the fairways. Maybe the rough though.
 

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While this is true, there are some attachments that other options could be better. Artillian for instance with a Pallet Fork and Grapple. The 0% will only work on JD and I believe Frontier stuff. That is where homework is needed to find out what bits are best from JD vs aftermarket.



What is wrong with the D series FEL? For instance on the 3025E? I agree with you in that the 3025E isn't a good choice in this case because he will want a Mid PTO which is why I said 1025R or 2025R. The FEL on a 3025E (at least the new ones) have JDQA so you can still change over to pallet forks, grapples and other attachments.
You are right, Deere uses the JDQA on all their loaders. The problem with the D series loader is taking it on and off the tractor is more of a project than most ever realize. The "D" series loaders require a lot time and effort to remove from the tractor, especially when compared to the "R" loaders or the prior "H" loaders. In fact, I have seen several of the 3 series "e" machines for sale with as few as 16 hours on them and when I spoke with the owner, they found that taking off the loader for some tasks or actions where you don't necessarily want the loader on the machine becomes an issue. I have never personally removed a "D" series loader, but I have been told its at least an hour long project or more to take the loader off and then to put it back on the SCUT and CUTS. It's the same with the "D" series loader on the 1 and 2 series machines.......

Often when mowing with a rear finish mower or flail mower on lawns, many people don't want the FEL on the tractor for turning radius's, etc. The way I would look at the 3 "e" series machines with the "D" loader is the loader remains on the machine 100% of the time. If that's acceptable, then fine, but if there is a chance you will want to remove the FEL for other tractor use, then expect it to be a project of an hour or more...............

Many dealers will finance Artillian, Heavy Hitch and other products they sell in the tractor deal. But it varies by dealer, so you have to ask.

The dealer is actually participating in the finance deal and loan underwriting with Deere credit, as the dealer has to repossess and make the machinery ready to be sold in the event of any loan defaults. If the customer defaults and the machine is worth less than the outstanding debt the dealer takes the loss. The dealer also bears the cost for recovering the machine, prepping it for sale or what they call "make ready to sell", which includes service work, cleaning, etc.

If what the dealer is able to sell the machine for after the costs to repossess it and "make ready to sell" doesn't meet the debt and recovery costs, then the dealer takes the loss for the amount of money not recovered. This is why in some cases, they want 10% or 20% down payments. It's also how the dealer can offer the loans up to 84 or even 96 months in length to make a deal happen because they are participating in the outstanding loans to some degree.

Truth is, the default rate on these loans with John Deere Credit is typically very low. I have looked up the historical loan delinquency rate in Deere's detailed financial reports. Unfortunately, the way Deere reports the loans which are outside of terms is by combining the agricultural and consumer loans together, just as they bundle the forestry and construction loans together in another category, but even then, the loan delinquency and "Non Performing Loans" are very small as a percentage of these loans.

Also, they list the quantity of the delinquent loans and the dollar value of those loans and usually, the numbers come down to the majority of the "non performing loans" being agricultural loans on farm equipment, not the SCUTS and CUTS based upon the average dollar amount of the loans. I am not saying that there aren't any "SCUTS, CUTS, etc." loans which go bad, but the number is very low, it's well less than 1% of the outstanding loan amounts in many years.

Speaking at length about this with the dealer, they confirm that these SCUT and CUT loans are rarely a problem for them........

Many other brands, which don't have the proprietary finance arm like Deere dealers enjoy with John Deere credit, end up charging the dealers a "buy down cost" for the dealers to offer low or 0% finance amounts. This is why with John Deere, it doesn't matter how you pay whether it's with cash or by financing it through Deere credit, the cost of the machine is the same. But other brands, such as Kioti and others, the dealer has to "buy down" the loan cost to offer the low rate financing, which effectively results in the customer paying the interest costs in advance to get the low or 0% financing.

Much of that issue is because there are 3rd parties providing the loan money and they obviously need to make a profit on their invested capital. In fact, on a few deals I looked at, on a $25k loan for brands which don't have manufacturer owned finance options, the cost to the dealer to offer the low cost financing was between 10% to 16% of the loan amount, payable up front, depending upon the customers credit scores. In those deals, the cash price is different than the "low cost finance" amount at the time of equipment purchase, often substantially different.

John Deere genuinely charges 0% interest on their stated 0% loan deals. Such is not the case with many other companies who also tout low interest or 0% finance deals. If the dealer wants to know "how you are paying" before they will quote you the total purchase cost, it's likely because there is a "loan buy down cost" which they must factor into the purchase price in order to offer low or 0% finance.
 

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I go with a 1023e it's at least a couple thousand less than a 1025r and only has 2 less hp. I got a 120r FEL and a 54D MMM. I have over 21 acres in middle Georgia with about 3 acres to mow plus the right of way to mow and bush hog. I had the timber cut on the other 18 acres and the FEL sure is handy for clearing brush. I have gotten more work done in less than 2 months with this 1023e than I did in 2 years with my old Ford 8n. Some people tell me I need a bigger tractor, not if its green and has a deere on it!
 
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