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Discussion Starter #1
This is for sale very close to me for $2000. It would make one heck of a tractor hauler.


1973 Loadstar 1600.

Wonder if I’d need a CDL. might have to do some research.




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Discussion Starter #2
Max GVWR of 24,500 pounds. I’d be good without one. Would be awesome for hauling tractors to shows.


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Hey, I want a title too!
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Max GVWR of 24,500 pounds. I’d be good without one. Would be awesome for hauling tractors to shows.


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Close enough colors to match the cub!


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Want two?

LOL, we have another one in the shed if you want two. . .

They are good trucks. I'm not sure about the 1973 year but some only had a single brake reservoir so if you lost one brake you lost them all. The brake booster is something else to check, they seemed to be susceptible on those trucks. Other than that, those trucks were pretty bullet proof.

If it's got a two speed rear, you'll want to make sure that shifts correctly both up and down. Check the tires and rims- some of the old style rims are fairly dangerous and many tire shops won't touch them now. If you have to buy new rims and tires, that gets pretty pricey.

Clutch is an obvious check- they will stick if the truck has been sitting. Usually they will free up ok but if not, then it's clutch time and more :gizmo:. The good news is I don't think you will find many hidden flaws- they are simple, honest trucks and a good look over will spot most problems particularly if you can drive it a short distance to check brakes, clutch, shifting etc.

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A friend of mine worked delivering beauty supplies. The company bought something similar with a box on the back. He kept getting stopped for no road tax stickers. Truck didn't even have any company lettering on it. Plus he had to stop at every weigh station.
 

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CDL class B single vehicle 26,001#'s and above..with or with out air brake endorsement. class A combination vehicle above 26,001#'S so if you have a class B and you have a truck weight of 26k and hook a 100# trailer to it you now need a class A this is the federal requirements

i wouldnt buy a truck like that with a gas engine. would melt your credit cost on gasoline + under powered and slow.. low gears can help but............ wouldnt be for me

some states have different rules regarding class 3 trucks and up. you might be ok with regular licence if your not for hire.. but may get hasselled none stop by the DOT and they just love seeing old trucks like that expecially towing .

some things ....even free is too much to pay lol :gizmo: but cool truck anyway
 

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Personal use

CDL class B single vehicle 26,001#'s and above..with or with out air brake endorsement. class A combination vehicle above 26,001#'S so if you have a class B and you have a truck weight of 26k and hook a 100# trailer to it you now need a class A this is the federal requirements

i wouldnt buy a truck like that with a gas engine. would melt your credit cost on gasoline + under powered and slow.. low gears can help but............ wouldnt be for me

some states have different rules regarding class 3 trucks and up. you might be ok with regular licence if your not for hire.. but may get hasselled none stop by the DOT and they just love seeing old trucks like that expecially towing .

some things ....even free is too much to pay lol :gizmo: but cool truck anyway
I don't think you would need a CDL if you are under 26,000, no air brakes and personal use. I might be wrong but that's my recollection. If you tow with it, you could run over the 26,000 plus you would then have an articulated vehicle. If you are hauling smaller tractors, there wouldn't be a need to license it that high or you could keep a 25,000 lb license and pull a trailer. The truck with a flatbed should scale right at 7,500-8,250 empty depending on the bed. Even a 10,000 lb load plus a 3,000 lb trailer would still keep you legal.

We typically licensed our similar trucks at 24,000. That engine will pull a full load but won't be a jackrabbit on starts. It usually wasn't an issue as the truck body was scaled to hold right at the limit but good wheat could easily push it up to 26,000. That extra ton sure drove different. You needed the two speed rear then and split shifting was a good thing to know. Loaded we got 6-8 mpg, empty might be over 10 but some of that was hauling out of the field at very low speeds and soft ground.

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Now that I look at it.
Bob the frame (a lot)
Move the rear wheels forward
Add a divorced transfer case
Front drive axle with lockouts
Make some drive shafts
Find the biggest & oldest DRW pick up bed and slap it on the back.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Now that I look at it.
Bob the frame (a lot)
Move the rear wheels forward
Add a divorced transfer case
Front drive axle with lockouts
Make some drive shafts
Find the biggest & oldest DRW pick up bed and slap it on the back.
That would make a nice heavy duty pickup. I was thinking a tractor hauler.


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That would make a nice heavy duty pickup. I was thinking a tractor hauler.


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However it would be great for towing trailers.

For tractors you could do an old style ramp truck. I always see an old Dodge 350 DRW right down the road from me. Probably from the late 80's. Doesn't look like it moves to much.

That or do some kind of flat bed.
 

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The gas engine explains the low price in my opinion, especially since the rest of the truck appears to be in good shape. Do you know anyone with a rotting Dodge Ram with a good Cummins engine, or a 7.3 Powerstroke in a rotting Ford? Just a thought.

I think it would make a heck of a neat pickup with a bed capable of handling 10'+ long sticks of most anything you'd ever need to haul home. Or a car/tractor hauler. I'd be reluctant to shorten the wheelbase as that thing will ride like a buckboard.
 

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Had one years ago, used as a grain truck. Those 345's will freakin pull a load. Would haul 400 bushel grain well, but takes time to gain speed. Does not have a tight turning radius, maybe because mine did not have power steering. Heater is not worth a damn if you plan on using in very cold weather. Have had to use an ice scrapper on the inside of windshield before, so a guy can see thru the windshield. Boy, that brings back happy farm memories! Life was kind of rough at times, but loved every bit of it. Wish I could do it all again!
 

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I tend to agree, kind of a cool truck although, the 345 gas engine is going to be pretty light. But then again, if you aren't in a hurry going up hill, what the heck.
Concerning the CDL, you only need a CDL license if you are driving a commercial motor vehicle.

Federal Definition of a Commercial Motor Vehicle (some States have higher GVWR ratings)
Commercial motor vehicle means any self-propelled or towed motor vehicle used on a highway in interstate commerce to transport passengers or property when the vehicle—
(1) Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight, of 4,536 kg (10,001 pounds) or more, whichever is greater; or
(2) Is designed or used to transport more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation; or
(3) Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation; or
(4) Is used in transporting material found by the Secretary of Transportation to be hazardous under 49 U.S.C. 5103 and transported in a quantity requiring placarding under regulations prescribed by the Secretary under 49 CFR, subtitle B, chapter I, subchapter C.

PA Definition of a Commercial Motor Vehicle

Commercial motor vehicle—Any motor vehicle or combination used on a highway in intrastate commerce to transport passengers or property when the vehicle meets one of the following conditions:
(i) Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight, of 17,001 pounds or more, whichever is greater.
(ii) Is designed or used to transport more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation.
(iii) Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation.
(iv) Is a school bus.
(v) Is transporting hazardous materials which is required to be placarded in accordance with Department regulations.

https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/commercial-drivers-license/drivers

For a motor vehicle to be considered a "Commercial Motor Vehicle" in any State, it has to meet the GVWR limit of that State and also, it must be used in a business in commerce. E.g. it is used by a business to make $$$$$. If you use a motor vehicle, that would normally be considered a commercial motor vehicle because of it's GVWR, for your own personal use, it is not a commercial motor vehicle, in any state, and you do not need a CDL to drive it. Now, the minute you use that motor vehicle for any type of business, then it falls into a Commercial Motor Vehicle and you fall under the Commercial Motor Vehicle requirements of your State, or if you cross state lines, then you fall under the Federal definition. :good2:
 

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I think you have a great idea, J3 Driver. You're not going to put a lot of miles on it, so if it uses some gas, which it will, not a big deal. The four speed with two speed rear is a lot of fun to drive. It is the perfect truck to haul your son's Farmall Cub. You could letter the doors with your son's name and an IH decal. Plus it would be a great project for you and your son to get it in shape and build a body for it. I'd be quick to spend your money for it.

Downside is that it might put your flying Cub a bit further down the road.
 

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If you do buy it I wouldn't worry about the license unless you plan on hiring it out. If you were to plan a long trip I'd put new tires on it as it has retreads on the back and they look thin. Being that thin they have a tendency to come apart. Them trucks don't gather speed very fast but they will do a ton of work. I used to drive one for a feed mill back in the day. Had a big stake bed on it and I've had it full hauling feed to farmers. It was fun driving it but it wasn't fun unloading it. Mostly 50 and 100 lb. bags.
 

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If you buy it, put 'NOT FOR HIRE' signs on it. Of course that won't stop some Barney Fife type of cop from pulling you over if he thinks you're being a heinous criminal trying to skirt the long arm of the law.
this is what i meant..you will get the attention of every dot officer and they tend to make up their own rules. they see you towing anything with that and they will get all exited to pull you over and give you a hard time.. i have a class a cdl so i kinda know how it works.. they will pull you over just to see if you only drive it in the country you may not get harrased

were i live anything over 18k needs a dot inspection they dont care if its for personal use or not.. is it right heck no but they still do it.
:usa:hide: it was intended for farm work and slow country roads. why do you think they are only asking 2k obo and its not sold?

if it gives you a heart on buy it thats what matters. but practicality wise not worth it
 
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