Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I had a big open storage shed, about 48 x 60 that collapsed winter of '10. I was just finishing up my 30 x 40 tractor garage (Hmm. I need to post those pix some day, I know Randy likes pix).

At any rate, I've got a new storage shed going in where the old one was and here's the story. The structure went up in 2 days, next step is the concrete.

So here is the "before" shot. It was a lot of work dismantling and removing the old shed. The locals scavenged the roof and trusses, but I still had a lot of work this last winter getting things "back to the earth".

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
So the materials were delivered, and the corners marked. The crew then marked where each post would be so they could drill the hole.

The, the posts are put in the hole. You can see the support at the bottom of the post that both lets the concrete be the pad the post rests on and it helps (a little) anchor the post in the concrete. After the concrete is added (just enough to barely cover the post bottom), dirt is put in and tamped down.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
By the end of the day, the skeleton was done.

Next day started with the skin going on. Here's a close up of the soffet detail that makes things a bit less boxy.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I also put two conduits in, one for AC and one for low voltage. The pipes dead-end with caps on the about 6' out from the building. They are down 2.5 feet. Easier to do this now and have the pipes come up through the slab than to try to kludge in later.

The slab is 5 1/2" thick with wire mesh. I'm putting in some rebar on my own, mostly 1/2". I want it by where the slab meets the apron since the keyway in the concrete makes that a weak point (less area to spread the load). I also wanted something across the entire slab since all slabs want to crack in the middle. There will also be rebar under where the wheels of things will be in case that want to crack. Finally, the apron will have rebar all around it, and mesh, and will have 4 rebar that tie it into the slab so it doesn't move away.

I can get away with a lot down here in the south that would never fly in the snow belt as far as slabs on the ground and how much gravel you need under them. A 5" frost line makes life easy.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
In the first shot, you saw the green machine and boxblade used to grade the site. Here's another tractor shot.

Now before everyone gets upset about the color, remember I used my JD 4520 with TnT and the box blade to get the grade at the site ready. Here's a close up (when it was all new).

Pad pour is tomorrow, will have more pix.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,593 Posts
Looking good Pete! :thumbup1gif::thumbup1gif:
Looks like you have buildings popping up all over your property. I hope those doors are good and tall, 10 foot? And yep, gotta love the pics. :yahoo:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The doors are 12' wide by 9' tall. Enough for any SCUT and a few other things. As with all projects, it's so easy to go over budget by just making everything a little bit bigger, taller, wider, etc. The doors on my tractor garage are 10 x 10 and 12 x 8.5'. I wish I had know that there were 9' doors available back then. For some reason, the jump to a 12 wide by 10 tall was a big one. Doors on the garage to the house are 8' 3", there's a story there....

So all doors I have can park a 4x20 tractor, and there is some room to spare.

But, there is enough room next to this to build a 40 x 60 shed so at least there is a plan 'B'...

Pete
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,337 Posts
Looking good Pete, and thank you for extending the soffit out from the walls all the way around as it makes the building look so much better.

Will a welder go in there? Hint...hint...:laugh:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,321 Posts
Will a welder go in there? Hint...hint...:laugh:
I'm betting he will ignore that question:mocking:

Looks great Pete!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,593 Posts
So all doors I have can park a 4x20 tractor, and there is some room to spare.
Whew, very good, I feel better now. :thumbup1gif:

Yep, I agree, the soffits are the only way to go. Nice job.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,337 Posts
I'm betting he will ignore that question:mocking:

Looks great Pete!
LOL...you may be right; but one would think an EE (aka Electrical Engineer, Sparky in the industrial/commercial world) would love an arc welder to make sparks. Then again, isn't Pete's EE in electronics where sparks are a real bad thing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Here's a mid-pour shot, I'll post a final shot in a bit. I had to leave the rebar lying down for the pad so the truck could get in to reach the back. I had just put the rebar down at this stage, and after that little section where the shoot is was poured I put the chairs in to hold up the rebar, and then the wire mesh was added.

On the last building, they used a metal keyway between the pad and the apron. They (the flatwork contractor, who was contracted by Morton) said that "you don't see much keyway anymore". Well, it's only been 18 months... So they used the felt pad. Down side is the board has to come out after everything is poured and things are setting up so it's a lot of re-work at a critical time. On the other building, once the area with the keyway was poured that was it. I suspect that the felt is cheaper and since the crew is "just standing around" it works. But I would have preferred to not have to pull that board up mid-curing.

So if anyone goes through this process, I'd suggest they insist on a metal keyway. The flatwork company is saving money at your expense otherwise. Live and learn. Between the house and two Morton buildings, I've seen enough that on the next building I'll handle the pad myself (I'll be the one to contract it out and supervise it).

Wish someone had mentioned the welder idea before I sized the building, I might have gone up a size just to have a place to weld.... :mocking: Darn...

Maybee the next building...

As for that "sparky" thing, I get nervous at anything over 5 volts or 5 amps or 5 watts. I like to work at the kind of energy levels where there are No sparks :laugh:.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
I have nothing of value to add other than I am jealous of your tractor, new building, property, and location. :spam:

:laugh:

It looks great BTW.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,593 Posts
Looking good Pete. :good2::thumbup1gif:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Tnx, 6dog. I'm pretty lucky...

Here are some shots post pad pour.

The first shows the slight slope to the pad, and you can see I've really built up the final grade around the shed. There was about 8" of fill and the ground slopped away so I've put about 20 FEL loads of dirt to get thing slightly sloped and mow-able.

The second shot shows the pads. You can sort-of see the 1 inch drop down at the doors to keep water out. I suspect I'll come out another 8' with gravel so I'll have 8 feet of concrete and 8' of gravel for an apron.

The third shot is the west side opposite the doors. You can see the slope so that water goes away, and the beginning of the gravel perimeter.

I still have to get the north side graded for water run off, that's next. I'll take before and after pix. Then I need to do the gravel boarder around the other two sides. The side in the picture is where water comes off the roof, so I wanted to get that in ASAP. We had one rain, and the sides are splattered with mud, so I'll have to wash that off.

When they cut the hay soon, I'll have them roll a mini-bale and spread out the hay over the dirt. Then this fall I'll worry about grass seed. It's pretty late in the year to start grass seed, and there is no water near here.

I'm only good for about 4 hours in the morning, it's getting up in the 90's this week. It will cool down to mid 809's for a few days. So all those people who may have been envious of our spring weather, the tables have turned and it's hot like summer now, not good outside project weather.

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,593 Posts
On the last building, they used a metal keyway between the pad and the apron. They (the flatwork contractor, who was contracted by Morton) said that "you don't see much keyway anymore". Well, it's only been 18 months... So they used the felt pad. Down side is the board has to come out after everything is poured and things are setting up so it's a lot of re-work at a critical time. On the other building, once the area with the keyway was poured that was it. I suspect that the felt is cheaper and since the crew is "just standing around" it works. But I would have preferred to not have to pull that board up mid-curing.

So if anyone goes through this process, I'd suggest they insist on a metal keyway. The flatwork company is saving money at your expense otherwise. Live and learn. Between the house and two Morton buildings, I've seen enough that on the next building I'll handle the pad myself (I'll be the one to contract it out and supervise it).
Sorry, Pete need to disagree with you on this one. Though the key and rebar tie between the pad and apron is a good idea in your neck of the woods, it is a definite no no up here in frost country. My cement guy would not do a tie between the two. Boy, am I glad I didn't. My front pad every year will raise 2" to 3" due to frost. Had I tied the two together I would have had broken concrete in my shop just like he told me. The pad just goes up and down with the frost. I think one has to consider their climate before commiting to something like this. Here in the north I would not do it.

Your project looks very nice and well done. More to store things in. :good2: Need to get those doors on and buttoned up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Randy, thanks for bringing up a good "regional point" :thumbup1gif:. We don't disagree, we just have different conditions to work with.

It took a while for me to figure out what works down here vs. what worked in New England. The keyway or felt just makes for a clean break if the apron wants to move. Most of that movement would be settling of the clay soil as it drys out. We had a big drought back in 2007 and a lot of flatwork cracked and buildings had shifts. In this 5.5" thick pad, there is about 1.5" of concrete below the felt pad.

The downside to the "life is easy down here" aspects of all this is that it's too easy to put in a poor foundation and have things move. The other down side is I'll be out there in 90+ heat working for a bit today...

Like so many other topics discussed here, always check out the local protocols. Between latitudes, soil conditions, weather and the like this whole tractor game is a YMMV world.

Great catch Randy! tnx!

Pete
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
So today I got the grading right on the north side of the shed. The first picture is the "before". YOu can see where the water puddled in the foreground. The drop in elevation was between 0 and 2 inches.

In the next shot we have "after". Now there is a trough that is about 5" lower than the top of the dirt as it is against the building. After this shot, I worked the area with some extra dirt by hand close to the building to insure a drop away from the building. The exterior termite protection happens next.

It's so hard to capture grade and ditches in pictures....

Pete
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,337 Posts
The downside to the "life is easy down here" aspects of all this is that it's too easy to put in a poor foundation and have things move.

Pete
That can happen anywhere. You should see what our bentonite soils do to improperly poured foundations and flat-work. Add into the mix that our frost-line is 36" and stuff can get pretty ugly.

I call our clay soils "Claycrete."
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top