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Discussion Starter #1
I thought it was time to start my own thread on my barn build as there always seems to be people who enjoy this type of construction.

To start, the plans...

- 30- x 48- post barn building with 13' interior height.
- 12" overhang on all sides
- 4" concrete and 5-6" concrete at the location for the two post car lift
- two 10' x 10' doors on the north gable end and one 8' x 8' door at the south gable end
- one entry door on the west wall toward the north end
- two 3' x 3' windows evenly spaced on the west wall
All windows and doors are insulated.


Why did I choose this building dimension and door size?

Well on reason is cost, 36' width was considerably more and it was much cheaper to go longer than wider. Also, the site location is a little awkward as the septic mound is south of the building and the property line is just to the East. This limited what I was going to be able to do. Also, I plan on finishing and heating this building so I did not want a huge building anyways. Just large enough for a couple vehicles, my tractor and a couple toys.

The 13' interior height is very important to me as I will be installing a 2 post car lift as I do almost all maintenance myself on my immediate family as well as close friends vehicles. A car lift is really not horribly expensive and will make life so much easier.

The door size was a struggle for me. My wife and I just finished building our dream home and a lot of care was taken to ensure the house was dimensioned correctly without having any features that were too big to too small or overdone. Since the North side of the gable end of the barn will be the focal point of the barn as you drive up the lane, I want the doors to look symmetrical and fit the building size correctly. I just felt that anything bigger than a 10 x 10 would make the barn look too industrial. Plus that door size should fit anything I will be putting in the barn. The rear 8 x 8 door is just an entry door for my tractor and side by side and should be large enough.

Features...

Our house has a black metal roof with white vertical siding. Its VERY country looking and we want the barn to compliment the house as much as possible. So we are going with a black metal roof, autumn red siding and white trim. We even are going so far as to match the barn door panels with the garage door panels on the house. There will be a copula with a weather vane on top.

Who is building this barn?

After about a year of planning and getting quotes I decided to go with Pacemaker buildings. There were about in the middle price wise with other quotes I got but they allow me to save some series coin on doing a lot of the work myself. I am pretty handy as I am a mechanical engineer who has worked in the construction industry for 15 years so I am capable of doing much of the work myself and if I need help (which is usually the case) I have a lot of contacts that I can refer to. Also, My family farm is three miles away so heavy equipment is readily available. So basically Pacemaker will be building the shell, pouring the concrete and installing the windows and doors. I will be doing all the site work, electrical, drainage, and interior finishing.

I also went with Pacemaker as they have built another building for my family and I like their work. The end of the construction process I will review them so others on this forum who might be looking for a barn builder may have an idea how they are to work with.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Site work Started


The site work is now complete with about 10-14" of gravel base to build the elevation up about 2" from the level ground around it. This "should" give me plenty of finish floor elevation height once the concrete is poured. I used my 1023e for much of it but I broke down and got my dad's JD 7820 to finish the digging and move stone as it was just taking too long with my little tractor.

Also, had to recruit my son for some power washing after we were done.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is 5-6" of concrete under the car lift going to be enough?
I was worried about the same thing but my uncle built a very nice shop at least 10 years ago and has about 5inches of concrete under his two post lift he uses every day and there does not seem to be an issue. The contractor also claimed that would be plenty of thickness. I will find out eventually but it is not a big concern.

Also, I did not share this but after the topsoil was scraped the clay was then compacted by the 7820 and let settle for a few weeks or so through a couple freeze and thaw cycles and then compacted again. Then with every gravel scoop of the 7820 the gravel was compacted little by little. It used up a lot of stone and took a lot of time but the site is really firm. Before the concrete goes down the contractor will use a compacting machine to go over it one last time.
 

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I was worried about the same thing but my uncle built a very nice shop at least 10 years ago and has about 5inches of concrete under his two post lift he uses every day and there does not seem to be an issue. The contractor also claimed that would be plenty of thickness. I will find out eventually but it is not a big concern.

Also, I did not share this but after the topsoil was scraped the clay was then compacted by the 7820 and let settle for a few weeks or so through a couple freeze and thaw cycles and then compacted again. Then with every gravel scoop of the 7820 the gravel was compacted little by little. It used up a lot of stone and took a lot of time but the site is really firm. Before the concrete goes down the contractor will use a compacting machine to go over it one last time.
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Toughsox;3216986[B said:
]Minimum suggested thickness for a 10K lift is usually 4 inches.[/B] But while that may the case I wouldn't do it without at least 6......thats my butt going underneath there and better to be safe than sorry. :laugh:
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With the use of fiberglass in concrete now instead of wire, I don't think I would trust 5" for a lift.

We poured the FIL driveway 2 years ago this spring. I know it has at least 4" of concrete and in from the edges 6-12" at least 5". I noticed a month or two ago where we went from the driveway to the walk a hair line crack at least 24" long. :banghead::banghead:
Nephew to my FIL who has been a concrete finisher -contractor for the last 45+ years talked my FIL out of using wire and just order the fiberglass and high strength concrete mix.

The worse thing nothing was driven on the driveway for close to 3 weeks after it was poured and his Blazer has been out of the garage maybe 30 times since this was poured.

IMO if I was planning on putting in a lift, I would put at least a sheet of wire in the concrete where the lift is gone. :dunno:
 

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I have 9000# hoist with 4" floor with 6" under hoist posts. Cement has fiber, only re rod goes around perimeter of building.

Hoist installer said 6" was not necessary because he drills thru anyway. With that being said I would put 6" under it again.

Only thing I wish I had done was put poly under the floor. In the summer the floor gets wet in humid weather and if I had used poly it wouldn't.

If you put poly under a floor in a none heated building it will prevent the floor from cracking in winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the thoughts on the concrete under the lift.

I haven't talked much to the contractor about the concrete specifically since my first meeting with him but I am 99% sure there will be wire mesh in the concrete. I will follow up as that is something I want. I will see if I can get it a little thicker than 6inches where the posts will be as well. They are super easy to work with so that should not be an issue.

The columns are not a bad idea, I will talk to the contractor about that and see what he thinks.

The building will be heated but there will be poly under the floor anyways. There will also be foam board around the edges against the wall. I do not know how much that helps but that is what they recommend.

They will be starting construction early next week as there was a slight delay on my end since I added the 8 x 8 door late in the process and it had to be ordered. They did not want to start work until all materials were onsite.

I do have a question for all you wise folks out there. I will be doing my own gutters as their gutter package was ridiculously overpriced. What does everyone recommend? Looking online I see plastic, copper, aluminum, extruded to length, 5inch, 6inch.
 

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Thanks for all the thoughts on the concrete under the lift.

I haven't talked much to the contractor about the concrete specifically since my first meeting with him but I am 99% sure there will be wire mesh in the concrete. I will follow up as that is something I want. I will see if I can get it a little thicker than 6inches where the posts will be as well. They are super easy to work with so that should not be an issue.

The columns are not a bad idea, I will talk to the contractor about that and see what he thinks.

The building will be heated but there will be poly under the floor anyways. There will also be foam board around the edges against the wall. I do not know how much that helps but that is what they recommend.

They will be starting construction early next week as there was a slight delay on my end since I added the 8 x 8 door late in the process and it had to be ordered. They did not want to start work until all materials were onsite.

I do have a question for all you wise folks out there. I will be doing my own gutters as their gutter package was ridiculously overpriced. What does everyone recommend? Looking online I see plastic, copper, aluminum, extruded to length, 5inch, 6inch.
You want seamless aluminum gutters. If you have any trees around, you also want gutter guards. Neither will be cheap, but essentially maintenance free.
 

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I was on a tight budget when I built but decided to put off a few items and spend a little more on things that are hard to change or fix later. Concrete being the main item. Spend a little more, go thicker, 6” and lots of rebar. You can’t add it later and if plans change and then you can put anything anywhere. I know my layout changed over time. I also never expected to own a 15k lb backhoe but I don’t think twice about bringing inside to work on. Good prep, good concrete and a really good placing crew is about the most important thing there is building a shop. Most everything else can be fixed.

The other suggestion is to frame in more doors. At least a man door opening in every corner, and if there’s room on the sides to add on, frame in an 8x8 opening. You might find in a few years you want to put in a separated room for welding, woodworking or just storage and have it accessible. The cost for this is almost nothing while you’re framing.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Completed the framing.

So far I am happy with their work. I am a little annoyed that they pulled the dirt from the holes in the barn rather than pulling it out but that is a minor thing. The wood is okay quality but they are using a lot of it.

I am SO glad I added that door in the back. It will make pulling the tractor in and out so much nicer.
 

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Completed the framing.

So far I am happy with their work. I am a little annoyed that they pulled the dirt from the holes in the barn rather than pulling it out but that is a minor thing. The wood is okay quality but they are using a lot of it.

I am SO glad I added that door in the back. It will make pulling the tractor in and out so much nicer.
 
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