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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So, I will warn you all right away, this won't be a fast moving thread. I always enjoy seeing others build threads though, so I thought I would share mine with everyone as well.

I am building a pole barn myself on nights and weekends (with help from my dad, father-in-law, brother-in-law, friends, and a guy I hired that we used to work with that builds pole barns for a living). We are also having a house built starting very soon and will be putting some work in on that as well so that will distract us from the pole barn at times (I will probably include a few pictures of the house too when the time comes).

A little back story: We bought the land last summer/fall, and over the winter made plans to build a house and pole barn on the property. We are on a sandy hill and can see for about a mile in almost any direction and just felt it was the best land we had seen in the 4+ years of looking. The land was a corn field last year, so we are truly working with a blank slate. Around here you can't build a pole barn without at least a house permit filed as well, so with delays from the bank, etc. we were finally able to get started recently on the pole barn :yahoo: as the house will be started in the coming weeks.

The pole barn will be 40' x 70' with sidewalls approximately 15.5' tall. The size was limited by the township but should be big enough for what I have planned. I will probably only be able to fill about 2/3 of it myself right away, but I already have others wanting to store stuff in it, funny how that works. We will be putting in two larger overhead doors at 16' wide and 14' tall (clearance enough for the 2 fifth wheel campers that will be kept in there) and a smaller overhead door at 10' wide and 8' tall. The smaller door will be for a separated bay that will store my future JD 1025R :greentractorride: in the summer and my Camaro in the winter, I am also thinking of lining it so that I can use it as an indoor wash bay for everything. Behind that bay I will have a workshop area, and above both of those will be a storage loft. We are using cathedral trusses in that area to provide additional headroom for the loft.

The land is a "flag lot" and there is a natural spring spot near where the land opens up where the old owners buried a pond years ago. This spot was still low and a little mushy this spring, so our first step was to cut a ditch along the future driveway for draining surface water and to dry up that spot. It worked like a charm and the driveway should be good to go when we get to that point later this year. We also found all of the survey markers from last year and put in 6x6 posts to clearly mark the property lines.

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We found out the week before we planned on starting on the pole barn that we had to have some serious footings under the poles :banghead:. We had planned on the pre-formed footers that you can buy that are 16" in diameter and 4" thick. What we actually needed was 28"-32" diameter footings that were a minimum of 8" thick. So we rented a 30" post hole digger attachment for my dad's bobcat (that he purchased to help us out and play in the dirt on our land). All of the footings ended up closer to 10-12" thick with the larger diameter footings on the sides of the overhead doors being over a foot thick. We had a local cement company deliver us 5 yards of cement for all of the holes. Unfortunately, everything happened so quickly that day that I didn't get action shots, only pictures of the aftermath. In the end it was okay because the rental of the larger post hole digger was actually cheaper from a different rental place and the cement was only a couple hundred dollars more than the post footers were. Plus, this building should never, ever go anywhere with footings like that!

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On that day, we also got our temp electrical service installed so we don't have to work with generators. Our builder loves us for this too so that he doesn’t need generators either when he starts the house.

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A few days later, we spent a Saturday setting all of the poles except 1 that was left out for the skytrack to enter the building when setting trusses.

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The following Saturday, we installed all of the headers, and many of the purlins around the outside of the barn that the steel will be fastened too.

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During the following week, my dad and I put up some more purlins and prepared for that Saturday when we installed the trusses!

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That was this past Saturday so that is where we are at right now. We have some more bracing to do in the trusses still, but there is enough in there for now to keep it stable in wind and storms if we can’t get back to it soon.

Like I said, this is going to be a somewhat slow moving project compared to others since we are doing it ourselves on nights and weekends when available around doing work for the house we are building as well as getting our current house ready to sell soon.

Thanks for looking and let me know if you have any questions or comments, I would love to hear them!

Nick
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Reserved for future updates/pictures.
 
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Reserved for future updates/pictures.
Reserving posts for future updates doesn't work on GTT. There is a 12 hour time limit to edit your post after it's created.

Updates will need to be new replies to the thread, which will also move the thread back to the top of the listing. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Reserving posts for future updates doesn't work on GTT. There is a 12 hour time limit to edit your post after it's created.

Updates will need to be new replies to the thread, which will also move the thread back to the top of the listing. :good2:
Sorry I missed that. I've seen it done that way on other sites so I just went with it. My apologies! :bigthumb:
 
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Looks great so far Nick :good2:
 
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I agree with Kennyd, so far so good.
Thanks for the post. :thumbup1gif:
 
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I didn't realize Michigan had much of any "open land" like that.
Just kinda' figured folks on top of each other separated by lakes and ponds.
Way too cold for my bones up there. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I didn't realize Michigan had much of any "open land" like that.
Just kinda' figured folks on top of each other separated by lakes and ponds.
Way too cold for my bones up there. :laugh:
Michigan has a lot of agriculture, and with land values going up around here recently, farmers are starting to split up their fields and sell them off. Lots of forest in many parts of the state too, but you are right, a lot of lakes as well. Right now we are in a subdivision and can't wait to get out of here, we have 3.7 acres on this property.

And yeah, it can get very cold, but I can work up a sweat in no time in the dead of winter so I don't normally mind it too much. We have been in the 90's the last few days here too, so we actually end up getting four quite distinct (sometimes extreme) seasons! Family is too important to us though to move away from here though.
 

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That's going to be one nice building for sure! :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Looks great so far Nick :good2:
I agree with Kennyd, so far so good. :thumbup1gif:
That's going to be one nice building for sure! :bigthumb:
Thanks for the compliments!

So, we did make a little progress this past weekend, but then I went on a trip for a couple days so this update is a little late.

We got a few more boards up for hanging the steel later and the overhang on the one end that we didn't get to the previous week.

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The main work we did was brush hogging the whole property and digging on the house site. With the construction loan getting close we decided to get a head start on the excavating of the house site. We peeled off the top soil down to the sandy sub soil and leveled it out a little bit.

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Then on Monday we finally got word from the bank that the construction loan is done and we will be closing next week:yahoo::lol::laugh::good2::cheers:, so now that means we can start making actual plans for the house. We will be meeting with the excavator this weekend to see what else we can do to save us a little money before he comes in. Probably not going to be much progress on the pole barn this week, but maybe a few boards again. Next weekend when the friend that I hired that builds pole barns for a living is back from vacation, we will make some more significant progress on the pole barn. We are planning roof sheeting, framing the header for the smaller overhead door, and probably starting the roofing.

Edit: With the bank situated now, that also means that they are done messing with my finances and I can start looking to acquire the JD 1025R that I've been dreaming/drooling about for the last year or so!!:greentractorride::yahoo:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nice barn , i like/i would use metal/steel roof panels for sides and roof :thumbup1gif: and concrete floor min 6 inch
Thanks. It will be a shingled roof (I'm not a fan of steel for the roof), and steel for the sides with a wainscot two tone to match the house. Floor will be 5-6 inches thick. I don't foresee anything super heavy going in there, but you just never know, it's not worth going light with a 4" floor in a large building.
 
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Thanks. It will be a shingled roof (I'm not a fan of steel for the roof), and steel for the sides with a wainscot two tone to match the house. Floor will be 5-6 inches thick. I don't foresee anything super heavy going in there, but you just never know, it's not worth going light with a 4" floor in a large building.
imo, stay away from shingles. metal lasts longer and you never have to clean the gutters from shingle sand.
 

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Tin/Steel > Shingles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
imo, stay away from shingles. metal lasts longer and you never have to clean the gutters from shingle sand.
Please explain, you are not making any sense to me.
Tin/Steel > Shingles.
I do understand the longevity/low maintenance benefits of a steel roof but there are two main things that I don't like. 1. I've never cared for the look of a steel roof, plus the house will be shingled (again, don't like the look of steel on a house either) and I am trying to match the general look/feel of the house with the colors, etc. 2. Every building I've been in with a steel roof has always been loud when it's raining. Even those that have been insulated, etc. have still been louder to me than a shingled roof. Maybe I haven't been in a really well installed/insulated steel roof building, but I'm not looking to spend extra on top of the extra cost of steel just to make it quiet.
 

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The building is looking good.

You have a clear field of fire for a mile in all directions, and the township restricted the height of YOUR building in the boonies. GRRR! Then you had to file for a permit to build a house before you could legally build the barn. GRRR! I think it's a great idea to have an outbuilding to use as a shop and materials storage while building a house.

I'm looking forward to seeing your progress.

Damn Gummint!
 

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I do understand the longevity/low maintenance benefits of a steel roof but there are two main things that I don't like. 1. I've never cared for the look of a steel roof, plus the house will be shingled (again, don't like the look of steel on a house either) and I am trying to match the general look/feel of the house with the colors, etc. 2. Every building I've been in with a steel roof has always been loud when it's raining. Even those that have been insulated, etc. have still been louder to me than a shingled roof. Maybe I haven't been in a really well installed/insulated steel roof building, but I'm not looking to spend extra on top of the extra cost of steel just to make it quiet.
Same goes for me. Steel roofing is also NOT what it was years ago. Today's steel roofing may not leak for a long time but it will probably look like crap in a much shorter time.
We put steel on our new garage in 2011 simply because it was cheaper. Aluminum roofing IMO is FAR better than steel but at a cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The building is looking good.

You have a clear field of fire for a mile in all directions, and the township restricted the height of YOUR building in the boonies. GRRR! Then you had to file for a permit to build a house before you could legally build the barn. GRRR! I think it's a great idea to have an outbuilding to use as a shop and materials storage while building a house.

I'm looking forward to seeing your progress.

Damn Gummint!
Thanks!

Yeah, all of the hoops you have to jump through get a little frustrating:banghead:, and I could have technically gotten around the permit, etc. for the pole barn. But, I figure that I'm going to have to deal with the inspectors throughout the whole house process too so I didn't want to ruffle any feathers and pi$$ anyone off that would make it difficult for my builder with the house.

As for the height, yeah, I probably would have made it a 6/12 roof rather than the 4/12 that it will be if the restrictions weren't there, but in the end, it will still be a great building, I shouldn't have any problems with the lower pitch, and I will have a little less into the material cost too because of it.

As far as the permit processes go, that is normal around here. Too many times in the recent past (15-20 years) local townships have gotten burnt by people building their pole barn first and then living in it and never building the house like they said they would. I understand it, but still frustrating. So now, both permits can be pulled at the same time and the pole barn can be built right away like we are doing, and the house just has to be started within a year. Like you said, this gives us a chance to get the pole barn up and it can be used for storage during house construction.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Alright, time for an update. Like I said before, we didn't plan on getting much done with the pole barn this week since the house plan was starting to move. We just did a little prep work for this coming Saturday when we will be sheeting the roof. Really the only noticeable thing in a picture would be cutting the tops of the poles off flush with the trusses. I also trimmed down the tall weeds right around the pole barn that weren't hit with the brush hog the previous week.

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We also met with my builder and his excavator to see what we could do first to save us some cost. So we pulled off a little more topsoil around the house site and then started filling it in with sand to bring it up to where the basement floor will be.

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We didn't quite finish that on Saturday, so my dad, the awesome man that he is, took the day off yesterday and finished filling the house site in with sand and also started removing top soil where the driveway will be in front of the house. (Really he just likes playing with his Bobcat, so I don't stop him!:bigthumb:)

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This last picture is how the pond sat last night. You can see the darker sand in the bottom and the ruts from the Bobcat. We were about as deep as we were going to be able to go with just that. It was just getting too wet in the bottom to be able to make any real progress without better excavation equipment.

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And my last note for today is that on my way to work this morning, I noticed the excavator had his equipment out there. As far as I know, he didn't have a whole lot left to do right now other than digging the pond out for more fill sand for use later and maybe try to pack/level off the house site a little better. Before he can do more, he will be waiting for my builder's surveyor to stake out the house this coming Friday so he can dig the trenches for the footings/frost walls. I will be going out there tonight to see if he did indeed do any more (of course I'll take pictures if he did) and talk to him again if he happens to be there.
 
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