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Had to sharpen 4 chains yesterday, thought I would post a picture of my setup.. it's worked out really well for me over the years. I bought the sharpener because it took to long for the sharpening service to do them, now I have no waiting.

I took Foley Belsaws chain sharpening course after I bought it, didn't cost that much back then and I learned allot about repairing and sharpening chains. :good2:
 

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Nice! Now we have a place to send our chains to have it done right.

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Nice! Now we have a place to send our chains to have it done right.

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Brian they make cheaper chainsaw sharpeners today, mine is made in Italy imported by Oregon.... Bought it from Northern, paid around $250 for it as I recall. It's easy to sharpen chains once you get a reference book and some cheap chain gages, probably find a you-tubetube video that shows how to do it. Nothing like being self-reliant. The machine over the years has paid for itself and probably has saved clutches and bars by me always having sharp chains. :good2:
 

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Very nice! :thumbup1gif: Neat, orderly, and mobile that is how I like it also. And, I hate the waiting thing, just can't beat owning your own equipment, you can get the job done right that way. :mocking:
 

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Very nice! :thumbup1gif: Neat, orderly, and mobile that is how I like it also. And, I hate the waiting thing, just can't beat owning your own equipment, you can get the job done right that way. :mocking:
Randy we needed a chainsaw to remove a fairly large downed branch from our whopper of storm last evening, power was out all night, didn't get it back until late this morning then the internet went down for a while...nice to have four freshly sharpened chains ready to put in service if need be.

Like you say, that waiting business is for the birds when you want to get things done on your schedule. I have never kicked myself in the pants for buying it. Mounting it on the movable table has been real handy too.:thumbup1gif:
 

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For a number of years I sorta-sharpened chains by hand. The idea was that in an emergency, I'd be able to get by with the 4 chains I have for each saw. By the time I'd ruined a few chains, I had the hang of it.

This winter when I was cutting small trees around the dam, I had a "Chainsaw Vs. Rebar" incident. It was nice to take two minutes in the field and be able to keep going and get the job done.

Always thought about getting a sharpener, but it's hard to justify for the casual use of the occasional downed tree or trimming around the dams. Then you get events like storms (Hurricane Fran in 1996 and a micro-down-burst in 2000) where you've suddenly got a forest of trees down and then that sharpener makes sense. Mobile makes sense too, and fits with my "garage tetris" implement storage scheme (dolly storage for lots of stuff).

Not sure if this is _another_ winter project for me, but that sure sure is a sweet piece of "cutting edge" technology you have there :thumbup1gif:.

Pete
 

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For a number of years I sorta-sharpened chains by hand. The idea was that in an emergency, I'd be able to get by with the 4 chains I have for each saw. By the time I'd ruined a few chains, I had the hang of it.

This winter when I was cutting small trees around the dam, I had a "Chainsaw Vs. Rebar" incident. It was nice to take two minutes in the field and be able to keep going and get the job done.

Always thought about getting a sharpener, but it's hard to justify for the casual use of the occasional downed tree or trimming around the dams. Then you get events like storms (Hurricane Fran in 1996 and a micro-down-burst in 2000) where you've suddenly got a forest of trees down and then that sharpener makes sense. Mobile makes sense too, and fits with my "garage tetris" implement storage scheme (dolly storage for lots of stuff).

Not sure if this is _another_ winter project for me, but that sure sure is a sweet piece of "cutting edge" technology you have there :thumbup1gif:.

Pete
Thanks Pete, it's made its money back for me over the years....

I like to clean and gage the bar's grove and turn the bar over evertime I sharpen a chain... I have the tools to gage with so I might as well use them....

I don't need to sharpen chains as much as when I first moved on the property 20years ago, all the tree clearing has been done, now sawing amounts to prunning and the occasional storm damage job.

I tried the hand files but I never could get the hang of it, they say you only need to hit the cutters sideplate a couple times after the chain starts showing signs it's dull. I tried but I never got it right. :laugh: Sort of like me trying to sharpen a drill bit by hand, no can do...
 

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I have a small company I run on the side, tree remvoval and snowplowing. I'm also a dealer for 3 small engine parts distributors here in Canada, including saw parts and accessories. Don't sell much, and don't really care if I do, got dealer status so I could get supplies cheaper, particularily chain, I buy in bulk and spin my own. I got a cheap Oregon 511/512 clone sharpener from a chain called Princess Auto, akin to Harbor Freight, Nortnern etc., several years ago. Like Pete, was used to sharpening by hand, but I just can't compete with the edge the sharpener puts on, and I've been sharpening since I was 17 by hand, and am now 57.

BTW, any of you guys hang out on arboristsite.com? You should check it out if you into saws, etc. Really good site.
 
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