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I decided to make some hard cider. I figured that if I'm making bacon and sausage and canning my own veggies, cider would be a good add to the homemade list. Here's what I started with, I wanted to do it on the cheap in case it didn't turn out. (More on this later)

6 gallons of Kirkland 100% juice.
20 oz Bubber's special Honey
Wyeast 4766

I fermented in a bucket for 2 weeks. Stable gravity readings told me primary was done, I racked to a glass carboy for secondary and added some acid blend where it stayed for 8 weeks. I kegged it a week ago and put the CO2 to it. It's been quite drinkable so far. I've got a long way to go with my cider making, but this one will do and have it's official debut this weekend with the family. I couldn't be happier with the clarity.

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I've got more batches going so there's more to come.
 

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Sounds great bubber!:thumbup1gif: We stick to wine making, but a friend tried his hand at hard cider last year. I think it's definitely like anything else, there is a learning curve. Our friend had trouble getting one batch to take the CO2, and the taste seemed to improve with age. Keep us posted.:bigbeer:
 

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If it's anything like your bacon, I might have to come down there and try it out. :lol::bigthumb:
 

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If it's anything like your bacon, I might have to come down there and try it out. :lol::bigthumb:
I really hope you liked it. Who knows, maybe next time I'm rolling through I can have bacon and a growler, or two of cider. :)
 

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I cheat and use Everclear. When we get our own apples, I'm going to work on learning how to do it the right way. I have about 5 years to go.
I'm interested if you make it from your own apples and super interested if you choose to use natural yeast. I'll talk to you again in 2020!
 

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I really hope you liked it. Who knows, maybe next time I'm rolling through I can have bacon and a growler, or two of cider. :)
Bring it!!!! :fed: The bacon was incredible. The smell of it cooking could bring a man to his knees. :good2:
 

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I said that I wanted to make my first batch on the cheap. Well that **** went out the window when I decided to keg. I bought a freezer off of CraigsList then proceeded to stuff it full of a bunch of hardware. I didn't skimp on the hardware other than the fact that I used regular hose clamps and not oeitker clamps. Here it is...

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I still need to run the power and gas through the wall, but it's close. I'm putting a fan in there as well. So much for cheaping out. :lol:
 

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If it's worth doing, it's worth doing it right. :thumbup1gif:
 

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If it's worth doing, it's worth doing it right. :thumbup1gif:
Perlic 630ss faucets and stainless shanks. It's all stainless once the cider passes the hose. I bought 100' of Bevlex and am running 10' to each faucet to start with. I'll grab a video when I pull the first pint.
 

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I'm interested if you make it from your own apples and super interested if you choose to use natural yeast. I'll talk to you again in 2020!
Been using store bought cider and apple juice, then adding sugar and cinnamon, simmering that for awhile to get things dissolved and sterile, then I pour the everclear into clean jars and add the "base" (as I call it) and quickly cap them before the alcohol evaporates. When the jars cool off they pull vacuum and are set aside for another 6 weeks to steep. After that they end up with my friends and of course the Mrs. has her share. I have some on occasion too. :)

I planted first leaf grafts last fall, so I'm quite a ways out from having my own apples. The intention is to make real hard cider out of them, someday.
 

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If it's worth doing, it's worth doing it right. :thumbup1gif:
Amen!!! Being cheap is usually very expensive!!!

Good call on the Perlick's - top of the line, and not a lot more, cost wise, than the cheapo's from China. I bought the 650ss's (variable flow), and I regret it (unnecessary).

I'd suggest going with a 12' or 14' of line - you can always cut it down a bit - and it's better to have a slow filling glass that isn't foamy as all hell vs. a fast one that is 3/4 foam!!!

If you're building you're own kegerator, try and get some cold air blowing up into your tower. That keeps the lines cold and prevent the "first pour foamies". My fancy kegerator has a deflector that grabs some of the air from the compressor and pushes it north. I've also seen others use a fan for push cold air into the tower.

We've made one batch of cider - the wort partly came from apples, some sugar, some juice - but we (well, I) want to make one JUST from apples. Do you any of you know how many lbs of apples it takes to make a gallon of cider wort??? I'm planning on blending them up prior to mash to maximize sugar harvest. We may put a bit of malt in as well, to give it a bit of a beer flavour.

Yours looks good Bubber - nice and crisp and clear!!

Cheers!!

-J.
 

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We'll see how the line length works out. I've got 70' left, so I can make changes. :)

I can't help you with how many apples you need for a batch, but I have this recipe in Primary right now and it has DME and grain, so you may like it. It'll hit the keg this weekend for a sit.

Graff (Malty, slightly hopped cider) - Home Brew Forums
 

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We'll see how the line length works out. I've got 70' left, so I can make changes. :)

I can't help you with how many apples you need for a batch, but I have this recipe in Primary right now and it has DME and grain, so you may like it. It'll hit the keg this weekend for a sit.

Graff (Malty, slightly hopped cider) - Home Brew Forums
Lemme know how 10' works. My kegorators came pre-lined, but from what I've read 10' is the minimum.

-J.


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I have 8' of 3/16" line on mine.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1437516848.331424.jpg

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1437516872.987856.jpg
 

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And you're happy with it??


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And you're happy with it??


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Um, yeah. Works great. :drinks:

You have to balance pressure, line diameter, and line length to get the right pour. I have mine balanced well with smaller 3/16" line.
 

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We've got 400 apple trees growing in our hard cider orchard. About half are 2 1/2 years old, the rest are a 1 1/2. We've been making hard cider for a couple of years. My wife is the scientist (Cider making is a micro-biological control process). I'm the orchardist.
The key to making good, interesting cider is to start with apples that have a lot of tannins and malic acid. Almost all of the apples we are used to are what are called desert apples. These are big bags of sweet juiciness. They don't make good hard cider. A good cider apple is something you'd spit out if you bit into it. We are growing Kingston black, Dabnet, stoke red, Harry's Master Jersey and a few others. They are 200 year-old varieties from England and Spain. But they are rare.
Some of the best desert apples for hard cider are Newtown Pippin (made famous by Thomas Jefferson), winesap, gravenstein. You can also add some tannins by including some crab apples.
If you are pressing your own apples, you need to kill off the bacteria with a bit of sodium nitrate. If you use already pasturized juice, there is not need. You can take your chance without the nitrates, but be ready to sample a brew that tastes like well used athletic socks.
We usually ferment various kinds of juice and them mix them at the end. Unless you like something that is mouth-puckering dry, you'll want to add a bit of fresh juice. I like to add a bit of pear juice (the big polymers in pear juice create a big mouth-feel to the cider).
Here's a source for supplies and tree stock that I've been using.
NorthWest Cider Supply Home
 
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