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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

Well, I finally did it. Funny how you can never have too much garage space. I went from a single car garage plus 10x18 shed for about 13 years. Then in 2015, we moved to a home with single car garage, plus a detached barn...2-story 24x28...and an additional, albeit really small, 7x16 shed. With our Township threatening that ALL buildings in 2018 will require stormwater run-off systems installed, I knew this was the year to make it happen and avoid all the extra expense of run-off plans. The 7x16 was pretty dilapidated and the JD just barely fit inside. Time to tear it down and replace it with something more suitable. :gizmo:

So, after much back-and-forth over a larger drop-in shed or a pole barn, I went with the latter. 24x24x10 on concrete slab. I wanted it built well, on concrete and make sure it looked nice. So, I think the result checks off all the boxes. I never plan to heat/insulate this building since its primary use is all lawn/garden equipment storage. My 2-story barn is already fully insulated and can easily be heated by a woodstove. That's where my workshop is located...1st floor is motorcycles and shop and 2nd floor is woodworking shop. If I had to, I could park a vehicle in the pole barn, but putting in a driveway up to it is not really idea for the location...nor is it necessary.

The old...



Almost there...



And, the new...




It was all finished on Friday...Sunday afternoon, I spent some time moving all the crap from the 2-story barn over to the new pole barn. Loving the extra storage!!! Now....plenty of room for the FEL ... someday.... :kidw_truck_smiley:
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I could use some suggestions for what to do around the perimeter. I already have some gravel at the entrance of the overhead door...but, the perimeter of the building needs something. Gutters are going to be installed today or tomorrow.

I was thinking of doing railroad ties around the sides and back set away from the building about 2 feet. Then, a layer of 3/4" clean stone followed by a top layer of decorative small riverstone. I don't want any plants / flowers around it that need maintenance. Or mulch...

Any ideas for finishing off the stone entrance at the overhead door...something to keep the stones from creeping into the grass ? Maybe a railroad tie again...

If I do railroad ties, should they be set onto a bed of compacted stone dust similar to how you would do a paver/patio?

Thanks in advance for any help / suggestions!
 

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I could use some suggestions for what to do around the perimeter. I already have some gravel at the entrance of the overhead door...but, the perimeter of the building needs something. Gutters are going to be installed today or tomorrow.

I was thinking of doing railroad ties around the sides and back set away from the building about 2 feet. Then, a layer of 3/4" clean stone followed by a top layer of decorative small riverstone. I don't want any plants / flowers around it that need maintenance. Or mulch...

Any ideas for finishing off the stone entrance at the overhead door...something to keep the stones from creeping into the grass ? Maybe a railroad tie again...

If I do railroad ties, should they be set onto a bed of compacted stone dust similar to how you would do a paver/patio?

Thanks in advance for any help / suggestions!
Yes, you will want to put whatever you choose on a sand base to make it easier to level.
Pavers will last longer than RR ties, and IMO look better, but there is a cost factor, and labor as it will take far more of them!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That's a nice shed!

Just my opinion - you may want to install rain gutters. Plus the ground is low all around the shed and will hold water. Some stone around the perimeter sloped away from the building will go a long way.
Good catch, Coaltrain - the gutters should be going on today or tomorrow. I'll have the downspouts out in back towards the woods.

Yeah, the slopes are not ideal. The finished picture there shows how he pulled the dirt away, but it still slopes intowards the building. Unfortunately, the building is towards the bottom of a bit of a swale. Which, I left the swale there as it should direct most of the water away from the building. I think it will be some trial and error - see how it goes with the rain and what I will need to deal with...

The gutters will help a lot, of course.

I like the idea of stone pavers for perimeter. The property already has some railroad ties here and there, so from that standpoint they could tie in. I'm OK with how they look...but not crazy about it. just "OK". Hmm....pavers.
 

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After I had my building and dirt work done all around, I did this. And it keeps me from having to spend a lot of time weed trimming or running into my building.

I used double layer of landscape fabric and added 2-3" of rock. The brick edging I use as a border took me about a half day getting it string-lined and halfway straight. The brick has angled ends and works really well laying them down end for end.
This is about the 4th year for the rock only landscape.






 

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Discussion Starter #9
What is involved in a storm water run off system? Gutters,or?
Nice shed, you'll enjoy that.
In my neck of the woods - Lancaster county, PA...I'm actually right over the line to the north in Lebanon county...Storm water run-off is all part of the "Save the Chesapeake Bay" initiative. All of our streams eventually reach the Chesapeake. So, someone came up with the brilliant idea that not one drop of rain water running off your roof (gutters, etc.) can leave your property. That's right. All rain water must get collected and returned to a hole in the ground on your property.

What this typically means for someone building a house or erecting a building with larger than 1000 square feet of roof area (the current limit) is that a fairly large hole is dug and then lined and filled with larger rock. This hole can then have sides built up and grass planted on it. But essentially, all gutters and drains must get piped to this retaining hole...as it rains, the hole fills up and the large rock keeps everything in place. After a heavy downpour, your new pond will eventually drain itself back into the earth.

The idea was to keep water from farmland, rich in nitrates from fertilizer, from entering the streams and then eventually landing in the Chesapeake. This idea has run rampant and now costs the average person building a new home around $20-30K in excavation, labor and materials for said retaining system, permits and inspections. (No, I'm not exaggerating). The regulations are governed at a township level within each county in PA. My building was under the 1000 square foot area limit and therefore was allowed to be exempt from the stormwater system. That exemption is going away in 2018 apparently. Hence, my decision to do this project now. Permit fee was $41 from the township and another $153 for the Engineering Firm to approve (rubber-stamp) my storm water exemption. $153 to stamp an approval on something that met the exemption requirements.

:FacePalmSlap
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After I had my building and dirt work done all around, I did this. And it keeps me from having to spend a lot of time weed trimming or running into my building.

I used double layer of landscape fabric and added 2-3" of rock. The brick edging I use as a border took me about a half day getting it string-lined and halfway straight. The brick has angled ends and works really well laying them down end for end.
This is about the 4th year for the rock only landscape.






Thanks for the pics - that helps. I'm liking the idea of the stone with the bricks/pavers for retaining the stone.
 

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It's hard to tell from the pic - plus I have a terrible eye for a grade - but it looks like the ground on the side of the building has a gradual slope toward the back. If so, with rain gutters, doing something like ilmo posted would work great without a lot of work.

I would just pipe the rain gutters to the woods behind the building as long as it slopes away from the building.

I was also going to mention putting down landscape fabric - or plain black plastic works also. A nice treatment with stone like that with no weeds growing will look nice and be maintenance free.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Its not your terrible eye, Coaltrain. The pictures don't do a good job showing the slope. But, yes, you are right - and I'll put those downspouts towards the woods, it should all flow away from the building quite well, given the natural slope.

That's the plan, at least.

:cheers:
 

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:bigthumb::bigthumb::bigthumb:
 

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Nice shop, John. :bigthumb:

My shop is the same size(24'x24'x10').
I did add a 12' X 24' lean-to on one side, and a 14' X 36' kitchen w/bath on the back.
 

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I could use some suggestions for what to do around the perimeter. I already have some gravel at the entrance of the overhead door...but, the perimeter of the building needs something. Gutters are going to be installed today or tomorrow.

I was thinking of doing railroad ties around the sides and back set away from the building about 2 feet. Then, a layer of 3/4" clean stone followed by a top layer of decorative small riverstone. I don't want any plants / flowers around it that need maintenance. Or mulch...

Any ideas for finishing off the stone entrance at the overhead door...something to keep the stones from creeping into the grass ? Maybe a railroad tie again...

If I do railroad ties, should they be set onto a bed of compacted stone dust similar to how you would do a paver/patio?

Thanks in advance for any help / suggestions!
That's nice, real nice!!! Maybe paver stones in front, they're durable and they look classy.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Very nice looking shop. Just a little landscaping and you're done.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Nice shop, John. :bigthumb:

My shop is the same size(24'x24'x10').
I did add a 12' X 24' lean-to on one side, and a 14' X 36' kitchen w/bath on the back.
Nice! I had them quote a 12x24 on the side as well - I sooo wanted to add this, but the price bump was $3200. It would have been great space to store some firewood, keep a small trailer someday, keep the lawn roller, etc. I went back and forth on that for several weeks and just couldn't bring myself to spend it. I haven't had that terrible feeling of shoulda-woulda-coulda...yet. The sad part is that on a pole barn, adding a lean-to after the fact probably won't happen. Good on you for doing it right away and a kitchen w/ bath? Nice!


Thanks much for all the suggestions, everyone. Hopefully I can get the landscaping done over the next couple weekends. Man, I could really use that FEL this year...that was next year's possible purchase. :gizmo:
 

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That is one nice building:thumbup1gif:
 
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