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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on making a shed to work on my tractors in after we, moved, It is part of a 3 sided shop, its 8' wide and 20' deep, the dirt is more dust when you walk through it your foot sinks 2" or so. any Ideas for a better floor would be great, I'm thinking of putting a tarp down then 4-6" of small gravel (the tarp is so the dust doesn't eat the gravel) and packing the
gravel....
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crushed concrete, probably cheapest, 304 which is 57 limestone with the dust in both of these compact well. other choice 57 limestone which is 3/4" stone washed.
check locally as the name of the product seems to vary by region.
I have heard 304 called road berm. Use "crushed" stone as it will lock together, gravel tends to roll around when you walk/drive on it.
Personally I like the crushed concrete, 1 it is $10 a ton here and it compacts very well, gets damp a few times and is almost concrete again. I use it for all my base applications.
 

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I'd just pour the concrete and be done with it. Depending on thickness it's only 2-3 yards at the most. Would be an easy DIY project and then you're done with it. Concrete is a lot nicer to work on than gravel and way easier to clean. You can easily roll things around and safely use jacks or support stands.

You never really own gravel, just kinda rent it. Takes continued maintenance to keep it decent and you just have to buy more every couple years.
 

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No matter what you do dig out the powder, at least a few inches. When we redid the floor in one of dads sheds we had the same thing. 2 inches of dusty powder, just awful to even walk in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
And as posted above me geotextile fabric will help, I use it under all my base but you usually have to buy a 400 foot roll.
You might find a supplier that will sell it by the foot.
Where are you located ? I have a piece left over from my pavers that would cover that area.

I'm in fruitland ID a bought 1 hour north of Boise.
I'd just pour the concrete and be done with it. Depending on thickness it's only 2-3 yards at the most. Would be an easy DIY project and then you're done with it. Concrete is a lot nicer to work on than gravel and way easier to clean. You can easily roll things around and safely use jacks or support stands.

I agree but right now I doent have the option of concrete.

You never really own gravel, just kinda rent it. Takes continued maintenance to keep it decent and you just have to buy more every couple years.
No matter what you do dig out the powder, at least a few inches. When we redid the floor in one of dads sheds we had the same thing. 2 inches of dusty powder, just awful to even walk in.
Our ground it this powder as far as you dig, it just turns to the powder as soon as you put an thing on it.
 

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Horse stall mats.
I agree. Just thoroughly compact what's there, or spring for some gravel and stone dust for a base. Then top it with 4' x 6' x 3/4" rubber mats, You'll need 6 of them to do 8'x18' of the space. Last time I bought them at Tractor Supply they were around $40 each but now are $50 - look for a discount coupon.

They will be a heck of a lot more comfortable than kneeling or lying on either dirt or gravel, and nuts, bolts, screws and other dropped small parts will be easier to find.

Later, if you finally do concrete, the same rubber mats over that will be even more comfortable.
 

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When I prepped for my barn I bought a huge heavy duty tarp from harbor freight and put it on top of the leveled, packed sand. I topped it off with 4 inches of crushed red brick.
 

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Get rid of the dust and pour a slab. By the time you get done buying fabric and 1 or 2 other materials, spread and compact and them maintain as well as replace the random piece of clothing you ruin working on top of it, pour a slab and be done with it. No kneeling on the random sharp point, easy to clean and roll a jack or creeper around on, stability, all things said above.

I have a 250 year old barn I work in. Started out with dirt and wood floored areas with some ancient high lime concrete areas where the cows were fed & milked. Slowly and laboriously I have cleaned out the dirt, wood etc and poured concrete. When I started it was $37 a yard around here, now it's about $115. Once and done, my 2 cents
 
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