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Discussion Starter #1
If you have ever checked into what replacing the brakes entails, you know the last thing you want to do is start the ball rolling on that adventure. In addition the operation of the parking brake is lacking as evident as the number of posts complaining of same. First up is my method of never moving the machine with the parking brake on, this is how I did it.

This is the switch that turns on the parking brake light on the dash.

20171123_114918.jpg

The other side of the switch that now has the brown wires on it is in the normally closed with the parking brake in the off position. What I did was to tie into the seat switch wire, the signal side ( not the hot wire ). As you know getting off the seat with the machine in gear will kill the motor. Now with this switch in the circuit, if you put the machine in gear with the parking brake on, it will kill the motor. It caused me a few laughs today as I restarted the tractor, and it could become a pain in the butt, but frying the parking brake is now a thing of the past.

This is the harness opened up to get at the seat switch wire.

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After I checked that it worked as intended I soldiered the connections and closed up the convoluted tubing. Jumping the wires together at the switch will take the parking brake out of the seat switch circuit.

As for the parking brake, someone needs an award for this.

My land is more hills than flat so when my parking brake got to the point where is wasn't as good as it was, now was the time to tear into it. The instructions tend to make you think of a rocket launch vs a brake adjustment. What they intend to happen is that as you press on the brake pedal the first thing that occurs in the differential lock is engaged, then the brake comes into play allowing both wheels to brake. Now what the intend for the parking brake to do doesn't necessarily happen. On the brake rod near where the adjustments are made there is a spring in a guide and a roll pin through the brake rod. When the parking brake is set there should be an opening between the spring guide and the roll pin as when the brake pedal is pressed to the max. The problem now becomes as you set the parking brake, the brake mechanism is allowed to relax and you no longer have max pressure on the brake mechanism. There is no way I can see to adjust the parking brake to hold the brake in max effort. Any ideas?
 

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This is a good safety addition, not knocking it one bit.

With that said, I can't imagine driving with my parking brake set. When I do try it is very evident that the tractor isn't moving. I have never gotten passed the initial push of the pedal and the loud moan of the hydraulics
 

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This is a good safety addition, not knocking it one bit.

With that said, I can't imagine driving with my parking brake set. When I do try it is very evident that the tractor isn't moving. I have never gotten passed the initial push of the pedal and the loud moan of the hydraulics
Sad but yes the moans are horrific but, like his mine is also fried by leaving it on. Unfortunately it was my son that used the tractor after I did and our property is so steep with hills so I used to set it often, now I'm too the point I go around and try to come back later. I know hardly ever can get off the tractor without shutting it off, just so I can leave it in gear as well. I still set the brake but it doesn't hold at all anymore.
 

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Sad but yes the moans are horrific but, like his mine is also fried by leaving it on. Unfortunately it was my son that used the tractor after I did and our property is so steep with hills so I used to set it often, now I'm too the point I go around and try to come back later. I know hardly ever can get off the tractor without shutting it off, just so I can leave it in gear as well. I still set the brake but it doesn't hold at all anymore.
Are you saying the tractor was driven with the park brake on? If that is the case of course the brake was destroyed. The same thing would happen if one did that with a truck or a car. Did you expect nothing to go wrong? One must know the logical out come of disregard for proper equipment use. As pointed out the loud groaning noise coming from the transmission should throw up a flag and grab ones’s attention that something is wrong.

I would suggest review the issue with your dealer and get proper repair and avoid any further damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
As for driving with the parking brake on I'll tell you how it happened to me. I'm mowing on some very hilly terrain. I just jumped back on and went up the hill. With the weight I have on the tractor the effort to climb the hill didn't change to me, so I just pushed down. As for destroying the brake, I can't say, but before I went through the adjustment procedure the parking brake wouldn't hold. I ended up not making any change to the bolt that ties the two bell cranks together, but I made a big change to the parking brake lock mechanism.

What I did was, I did the procedure and made sure the differential lock engaged before the brake. The is a roll pin on the brake rod and when the parking brake is set the manual says that the roll pin should have some distance between it and the spring guide. This would indicate that there is enough force on the rod pulling on the bell cranks to over come the differential lock springs and cam the brakes into the on position. Well what I found was the space I had at the pin diapered when I let the pressure off of the brake pedal. So it was in a not at full on position.

I released the turnbuckle adjustment and then pulled the pin that attaches the rod to the bell crank. Laying besides the tractor on the left side I could easily push the brake pedal to max travel and even engage the parking brake lock while there. The rod on the parking brake lock is 3/8". The distance between the part on the brake shaft and the shaft on the lock is at least a 1/4" or more. So when you set the parking brake, this movement eats up any locking force you have at the bell crank.

What I did was add a bushing to the rod that added .220 to the radius of the rod. This holds the brake pedal just off fully engaged and with the rod connected to the bell crank the space at the roll pin is there. I have full engagement with the parking brake on. The parking brake does have an eccentric that will move the rod for more engagement, but nowhere near enough. The manual says to repeat the adjustment procedure if you don't have the gap at the roll pin. My $0.02 says the gap at the roll pin is determined by the location of the brake pedal which is determined by how much the rod to the bell crank is relaxed when you set the parking brake. I've got 600 pounds plus with wheel weights and my counter weight, I've tested it on some of my best hills and it stays put, although I would not get off of it at those locations.
 

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As for driving with the parking brake on I'll tell you how it happened to me. I'm mowing on some very hilly terrain...................

What I did was add a bushing to the rod that added .220 to the radius of the rod. This holds the brake pedal just off fully engaged and with the rod connected to the bell crank the space at the roll pin is there. I have full engagement with the parking brake on. The parking brake does have an eccentric that will move the rod for more engagement, but nowhere near enough. The manual says to repeat the adjustment procedure if you don't have the gap at the roll pin. My $0.02 says the gap at the roll pin is determined by the location of the brake pedal which is determined by how much the rod to the bell crank is relaxed when you set the parking brake. I've got 600 pounds plus with wheel weights and my counter weight, I've tested it on some of my best hills and it stays put, although I would not get off of it at those locations.


The modification as a remedy for brake fix may be looked upon by JD as not kosher should the occasion arise to obtain warranty work. The damage could be masked. I would not be content with just the “adjustment procedure” for an issue created outside normal wear IMHO.
 
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