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Discussion Starter #1
15 years ago, my older neighbor needed some extra retirement money, he offered to sell me some land.
I could afford it, so the wife and I decided to buy the land.
We really did not know what the timber was worth,, we just wanted a bigger buffer between us and the neighbor,
Well, one day a guy down the road sold some timber, I was astounded at the money he got,,,:good2:
3 1/2 years ago, we decided to sell the timber. I hired a forester, he cruised it, and I put it out for bids.
The half dozen bids that came back seemed too low,,, so, we rejected all of the bids.

One guy came back, and asked what we wanted,, out of the blue, I came up with a number that was 40% above the highest bid.
He responded that we would never get that,, my amount was "ridiculous" :mocking:
I felt the price of timber would go up over time,, and my timber would grow,, so eventually, the my price would be correct.

If it took ten years,, I was willing to wait.
Well,, This past Saturday, the guy came to my house,,, with the check, for my "ridiculous" amount.
He said it would be a week or two before they showed up,,, Monday afternoon,, a D5 CAT was setting in my driveway,,,



The loggers dad came over the next morning, and widened my driveway entrance,,,



Wednesday, a skidder was unloaded





I think they were ready to start cutting my place!! :thumbsup:
More pics to follow,,,
 

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Good deal

I'm glad you got your price. I hope you negotiated a good contract with all of the needed provisions in there. The money is a good thing but you also want to protect yourself with a contract to make sure they comply with best management practices, don't log when it's too wet, have liability and worker's comp insurance etc. etc.

Hardwood prices for saw timber have been strong the past year or two and with housing starts up, the prices may stay for a while. Pine has not been as good as there is a lot of pine that grew during the recession and is still standing and waiting to be cut. Pine genetics have also improved rapidly so the supply has been more than able to keep up with demand.

Good luck with the harvest. Are they chipping the slash for pulp?

Treefarmer
 

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15 years ago, my older neighbor needed some extra retirement money, he offered to sell me some land.
I could afford it, so the wife and I decided to buy the land.
We really did not know what the timber was worth,, we just wanted a bigger buffer between us and the neighbor,
Well, one day a guy down the road sold some timber, I was astounded at the money he got,,,:good2:
3 1/2 years ago, we decided to sell the timber. I hired a forester, he cruised it, and I put it out for bids.
The half dozen bids that came back seemed too low,,, so, we rejected all of the bids.

One guy came back, and asked what we wanted,, out of the blue, I came up with a number that was 40% above the highest bid.
He responded that we would never get that,, my amount was "ridiculous" :mocking:
I felt the price of timber would go up over time,, and my timber would grow,, so eventually, the my price would be correct.

If it took ten years,, I was willing to wait.
Well,, This past Saturday, the guy came to my house,,, with the check, for my "ridiculous" amount.
He said it would be a week or two before they showed up,,, Monday afternoon,, a D5 CAT was setting in my driveway,,,



The loggers dad came over the next morning, and widened my driveway entrance,,,



Wednesday, a skidder was unloaded





I think they were ready to start cutting my place!! :thumbsup:
More pics to follow,,,
When they log around here they leave a frickin mess...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I expect them to leave a mess,, I have 4 areas that are similar that they have harvested,, so I know what to expect.

No, the slash will not be chipped.
I have heard recently that the chip buyers are not buying any chips at this time.

One place is buying pulpwood, that is wood that the buyer chips,,
there are no branches mixed in the pulpwood.

I feel like it is a win for me if they leave the branches,,
the branches will rot, that will add nutrients to the soil.

The state foresters are all over these guys, the harvesters are required to keep the state informed as to what they are doing.

There is no free lunch for loggers anymore. the state is watching EVERYTHING.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Are the treads on that skidder's tires pretty much worn off? Hence the need for the chains?
That is what it looks like, maybe they just have to replace the rear tires more often? :dunno:
 

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Will there be any left laying around for firewood that you're willing to part with?
 

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Congrats on the sale CADPlans!! I hope they do a nice job for you and don't tear up the property.



Are the treads on that skidder's tires pretty much worn off? Hence the need for the chains?
Around here all skidders are setup with chains like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Will there be any left laying around for firewood that you're willing to part with?
I have no idea,,
they did say the "block" pile would larger than anyone could haul off.
the blocks are pieces of defective log, rotted, ends too long, forks, etc,,,

but, my wood is mostly poplar, not very good firewood,,,
 

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State Foresters

I expect them to leave a mess,, I have 4 areas that are similar that they have harvested,, so I know what to expect.

No, the slash will not be chipped.
I have heard recently that the chip buyers are not buying any chips at this time.

One place is buying pulpwood, that is wood that the buyer chips,,
there are no branches mixed in the pulpwood.

I feel like it is a win for me if they leave the branches,,
the branches will rot, that will add nutrients to the soil.

The state foresters are all over these guys, the harvesters are required to keep the state informed as to what they are doing.

There is no free lunch for loggers anymore. the state is watching EVERYTHING.
Unfortunately for the landowners the state guys only have one thing in mind and that's protecting the water. As long as they don't screw up the streams, the loggers can do a terrible job for the landowner. I'm not dumping on the foresters, they are spread so thin that is all they have time to do. A really good forester will give you a call if they see something that's legal but really not right but they have no enforcement power unless it gets into a BMP violation and/or mud tracked onto state highways. You could have a logger leave widow makers, ruts 3' deep in your land, but over the property line (that's civil, not a criminal violation) etc. and the forester can't do much about it. If they drop a limb into a stream, now that's another story.

I have a fairly strict contract for each sale and it's site specific showing the land areas, travel areas, a limitation on logging when it's too wet and I reserve the right to stop harvest if conditions aren't met. I also meet with the logging crew as they move on site and make sure they know what the conditions are. (Sometimes the timber buyer doesn't bother to talk to the actual logging crew so I make sure the guys doing the cutting and skidding know what the deal is.)

It's not just me, the large timber companies are even more strict. I know one has a safety clause in their contracts which they enforce religiously because they don't want anyone getting hurt on their property.

Most of the long term loggers know how to do a good job but sometimes they rush and screw it up. I've had one crew that won't be back no matter how much they pay and frankly am in the process of changing forest consultants because the old one really didn't monitor the harvest like he should have. He was too close to the logger/buyer and not looking out for me. Fortunately, there are a lot of timber consultants so too bad for him.

Treefarmer
 

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I noticed the grousers on the D5 and the tree saw are rounded off on the ends. I've always seen them worn uniformly across the pad. I wonder if they are special for forestry? (I had a Komatsu D31P dozer.)
 

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Easier slide over stumps

I noticed the grousers on the D5 and the tree saw are rounded off on the ends. I've always seen them worn uniformly across the pad. I wonder if they are special for forestry? (I had a Komatsu D31P dozer.)
I suspect but don't know for sure that the rounded grousers are to allow the tracks to slide sideways over stumps and limbs on the ground. Otherwise they would either be knocking tracks off or find it difficult to turn. That's just my guess and someone else might have a definitive answer.

Treefarmer
 

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I suspect but don't know for sure that the rounded grousers are to allow the tracks to slide sideways over stumps and limbs on the ground. Otherwise they would either be knocking tracks off or find it difficult to turn. That's just my guess and someone else might have a definitive answer.

Treefarmer
That certainly makes sense. I've seen special grousers for muddy/swampy areas - they are kind of pyramid shaped.
 

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I noticed the grousers on the D5 and the tree saw are rounded off on the ends. I've always seen them worn uniformly across the pad. I wonder if they are special for forestry? (I had a Komatsu D31P dozer.)
ur dozer must of been pretty new if the corners hadn't rounded over like that yet. once that bar gets down to the height of the pad bolts, that was when the whole track was taken off, and sent in for a new bar to be installed(welded on), new pad bolts, and if needed the pins and bushings to be turned.


That certainly makes sense. I've seen special grousers for muddy/swampy areas - they are kind of pyramid shaped.
what ur thinking of is what's called Low Ground Pressure tracks. wider and lighter so it(the dozer) will float across very wet ground. i had the chance to run a cat d-5 yrs ago. i swear it could of walked across a pond, lake, river, :laugh: but once u got it stuck, u was really stuck then:banghead:
 

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LGP tracks

ur dozer must of been pretty new if the corners hadn't rounded over like that yet. once that bar gets down to the height of the pad bolts, that was when the whole track was taken off, and sent in for a new bar to be installed(welded on), new pad bolts, and if needed the pins and bushings to be turned.



what ur thinking of is what's called Low Ground Pressure tracks. wider and lighter so it(the dozer) will float across very wet ground. i had the chance to run a cat d-5 yrs ago. i swear it could of walked across a pond, lake, river, :laugh: but once u got it stuck, u was really stuck then:banghead:
Those LGP tracks are pretty much the norm here for ag and forestry work. Some of the pure construction guys don't use them but if you are clearing land for ag, they are preferred because you don't compact the soil. The forestry guys use them just to stay up out of the mud.

Every time, I hear of a dozer getting stuck I am reminded of a story from my dad. He was in the Army Corps of Engineers during WWII and most of what they did was construction of roads across New Guinea and some of the Philippine islands. Lots of that construction was in areas the Japanese were still active, (Army Combat Engineer battalion). They were building a road in the Philippines, I forget which island but a dozer got stuck sort of between the lines so they pulled back for the night. The next morning the only thing showing was the stack on the dozer, it had sunk straight down during the night. They left it and pushed dirt over the top to continue the road so somewhere there is a true dozer road.

Treefarmer
 
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