Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,093 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If most of you guys are like me, you just scroll the "New Posts" so I hope all the tool junkies don't get too excited. I need a COMPUTER ROUTER recommendation, not a woodworking router recommendation. :laugh:

I currently have a Cisco/LinkSys E2500 wireless router. It's been giving me some fits the last few weeks. I'm getting intermittent internet connectivity whether I'm wired or wireless. I'll lose the connection for anywhere from 15 seconds to two minutes. Then it will be fine for anywhere from a couple of minutes to a few hours. I think I've confirmed it's the router by plugging my laptop directly into my cable modem. I ran it that way for a few hours yesterday and had no problems. And, when I lost connectivity on one computer, I tried connecting on two other laptops that I brought into my office and they wouldn't connect either. Then, they'd all connect at the same time.

I also ran full virus scans on the two main laptops. All of the things it found were in the "minor" category and then "resolved". But I'm still having the issues.

I tried resetting the router (new password, reenter the static IPs, etc.) today and I'm still having problems. So, as much as I hate to spend money on computer equipment than on tractor stuff, I think I need to bite the bullet.

Looking for something a bit better than one of these little LinkSys routers that you pick up at BestBuy, but not something that's going to break the bank. If we can keep it under $300, I'd appreciate it.

I have Spectrum Internet, running at 100mbs. (Actually, through the current router I'm only getting about 85mbs - direct connect to the modem I'm getting about 120mbs) I'd like something that doesn't slow down the throughput. I'd also like wireless, although that's not a "must have" as I have a Ubiquiti wireless setup that plugs into the router. 4 or 5 ports would be nice too.

Any suggestions?

THANKS!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,992 Posts
I use a ASUS (RT-AC68U) also called AC1900 and and am very happy with it. It is a gigabit router both wired and wireless with 4 wired ports.

Dave

Sent from my Samsung Note using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,401 Posts
We had a recent discussion on mesh wi-fi routers here:

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/computer-electronics/162194-mesh-wifi-routers.html

I ended up buying a Netgear Orbi RBK50 set-up. It's been up and running about a month or so and I've had no drop-outs and running fine, even with a couple of power interruptions when I wasn't home.
I don't know if you're interested in this since you have a Ubiquiti set-up already.

I'm satisfied with my Orbi, though I got it with points, it usually runs just about $330 with base and 1 satellite, and goes on sale once in a while.

Just my 2 cents.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,944 Posts
I use a ASUS (RT-AC68U) also called AC1900 and and am very happy with it. It is a gigabit router both wired and wireless with 4 wired ports.
I have the slight older ASUS RT-N66U, it's been flawless covering my large house (although I did add three high-gain antenna's). I have the RT-N12D1 in the pole barn so I can walk seamlessly from the house to their and in the yard with a strong signal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
Ubiquiti

I installed a Ubiquiti edge router and wireless access point a few years ago. It out performs anything else I've ever seen. Takes a little more effort to set up but I found it worth it. At the time, it outperformed anything on the market in the same price range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,093 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
DeWalt, Bosch, Porter Cable. Oh wait.....nevermind :lolol:
:nunu: :nunu: :nunu: :nunu: Everybody's a comedian! :nunu: :nunu: :nunu: :nunu:


I installed a Ubiquiti edge router and wireless access point a few years ago. It out performs anything else I've ever seen. Takes a little more effort to set up but I found it worth it. At the time, it outperformed anything on the market in the same price range.
I got on Ubiquiti's website the other day and saw the Edge routers. What makes them more difficult to set up? Is it something that a stupid accountant like me can figure out?



I knew I'd recently read about "mesh outers" so I appreciate that link TomFive!! I had to refresh my memory today when ddinham posted about that Asus router. Pretty cool stuff. Right now my Ubiquiti access point has a different SSID than my router. But, I guess with "mesh" I can have them both with the same name and everything switches seamlessly.

I may need one of you guys to come by here to set this up for me. Can any of you be bribed with ribs? :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,587 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
Netgear AC1750 or AC1900.

Best bang for your buck.

I have installed about 150 of them in customer homes over 2 years and only had one go bad.

Shrink the 2.4 and 5.8 bands to 40mhz channel widths and you'll be good.

I've installed 5 Google Wi-Fi mesh systems, imo they are too expensive, $250 for a 3pk or $100/each pod.

Orbi - setup was a nightmare because they all had to be setup separate and firmware pushed then factory reset for final setup. Easy to do but not ready to go out of the box.

Edge router / ubnt WAPs are overkill for a 100mbps connection.

Good luck!

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
ERs have come a long way with the user interface, setup is somewhat more technical, not as easy as a standard plug and play Netgear/Linksys/Asus but they are a solid commercial router for the price. I have 5 in production. Three have died over 5 years, I suspect it has to do with heat. IMO Mikrotik routers are a better value, neither router uses a fan, the ER runs ridiculous hot and reboot times take forever.
:nunu: :nunu: :nunu: :nunu: Everybody's a comedian! :nunu: :nunu: :nunu: :nunu:




I got on Ubiquiti's website the other day and saw the Edge routers. What makes them more difficult to set up? Is it something that a stupid accountant like me can figure out?



I knew I'd recently read about "mesh outers" so I appreciate that link TomFive!! I had to refresh my memory today when ddinham posted about that Asus router. Pretty cool stuff. Right now my Ubiquiti access point has a different SSID than my router. But, I guess with "mesh" I can have them both with the same name and everything switches seamlessly.

I may need one of you guys to come by here to set this up for me. Can any of you be bribed with ribs?
Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
I will second (third or fourth, maybe?) the recommendations for the AC1900 (also known as the RT-AC66). If you can find the AC66U_B1 version of this router, it should be $100-$120 and well worth it. That's a slightly older version now, though, and the newer one is about $180.

The AC3100 (also known as the RT-88U) is an absolutely awesome router, but you do have to be a little bit careful about the configuration for the wireless networks. There are a couple of settings that ASUS defaults one way that can actually cause certain devices to lose connectivity (Airtime Fairness needs to be OFF, but they default it to ON). That router can be had for between $225-$250. I've been using this one for closing in on two years and it has been great (except for those wireless settings that got changed when I did a firmware upgrade and I had to chase down the problem over time).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
These are what I put underneath my routers , heat is the worst for electronics , there usb powered so I use an usb port on the router so when it's on the fan's are on.

https://www.amazon.com/AC-Infinity-MULTIFAN-Receiver-Playstation/dp/B00IJ2J2K0/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1534598900&sr=1-4&keywords=computer+cooling+fans
Have you had issues in the past on a router or similar device with heat causing problems? I've never experienced an issue myself, and my primary router is in the warmest room in my house... Never heard of an issue, either.

Yes, heat is the enemy, but these devices are 100% solid state. So heat creation/emission is relatively low.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
We have 5 Edge Routers running in an outdoor box with air circulation, full sun the box is roughly 160-170F inside on a 85F day. They can take the heat for a good 3-5 years. The router will likely outlive the power supply.




Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Have you had issues in the past on a router or similar device with heat causing problems? I've never experienced an issue myself, and my primary router is in the warmest room in my house... Never heard of an issue, either.

Yes, heat is the enemy, but these devices are 100% solid state. So heat creation/emission is relatively low.
I had an Asus Rt N 66U , that overheated and would start loosing connections every few days and would have to be rebooted . Then I got the Netgear Nighthawk Ac1900 and never had a heat issue out of it but I got those multiuse fan's just as a safety precaution and been using them ever since that 1st heat issue. I would hate to spend XXX amount for the router and then it go out in a few months or year . :thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,093 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I ended up buying the Asus AC1900 / RT-AC1900P. I was really torn between that one and the Ubiquiti/Amplifi that LGM linked to. I ordered the router off BestBuy's website and got in store pickup less than 30 minutes later. Price was less than Amazon, even before I got the 10% "birthday discount" as my birthday was a couple of weeks ago. I did something that I rarely do and bought the $19.99 two year extended warranty. With tax, I was out the door for under $200.

Brought it home and had it going in under 30 minutes. So far, so good. Doesn't seem to be dropping connections like my old one did and my download speeds (according to SpeedTest.net) have gone from 90MBS to about 114MBS. Upload speeds seem to be about the same at 7-10MBS.

The only thing I'm not too sure of is that this router has two separate SSIDs for the 2.4 and 5.8 Ghz networks. I don't know if I could give them both the same name. When I set up the 2.4 as "MarksWireless", the router setup automatically gave the other one the name of "MarksWireless_5G", so I just left it as is.

THANKS to all that chimed in and also thanks again to TomFive for linking me back to the thread from April. That one helped a lot too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
The only thing I'm not too sure of is that this router has two separate SSIDs for the 2.4 and 5.8 Ghz networks. I don't know if I could give them both the same name. When I set up the 2.4 as "MarksWireless", the router setup automatically gave the other one the name of "MarksWireless_5G", so I just left it as is.
There seems to be a never ending debate about whether to use separate SSID names for 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz. I don't think it matters from a technical standpoint. Many folks use unique SSIDs to ensure high bandwidth systems remain at 5 GHz, since 2.4 GHz signals have longer range and are more likely to automatically connect at a distance. Some do it to balance loading so there's less "competition" for tramsmissions. On the other hand, if both SSIDs are the same, systems will generally connect to the stronger signal, giving you better overall coverage. The down side is that a switchover usually only occurs at very low signal strengths (-70dB or worse), meaning that as you move around, you could remain on the lower bandwidth of 2.4GHz even if the 5Ghz signal is better at your particular location (e.g., -60dB). Apple devices are notorious for hanging to weak signals too long before changing over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
There seems to be a never ending debate about whether to use separate SSID names for 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz. I don't think it matters from a technical standpoint. Many folks use unique SSIDs to ensure high bandwidth systems remain at 5 GHz, since 2.4 GHz signals have longer range and are more likely to automatically connect at a distance. Some do it to balance loading so there's less "competition" for tramsmissions. On the other hand, if both SSIDs are the same, systems will generally connect to the stronger signal, giving you better overall coverage. The down side is that a switchover usually only occurs at very low signal strengths (-70dB or worse), meaning that as you move around, you could remain on the lower bandwidth of 2.4GHz even if the 5Ghz signal is better at your particular location (e.g., -60dB). Apple devices are notorious for hanging to weak signals too long before changing over.
You do NOT use the same SSID's for two totally different network technologies as it will confuse devices and cause performance problems. Additionally, the devices will not be able to properly switch from 2.4 to 5 when they come closer (5 has a shorter range but better performance) because you can't put the networks in "preference order."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,401 Posts
Interesting about the different SSID's for 2.4 and 5G. My old Netgear had them separate and as mentioned ... sometimes would hang around the weaker signal when a stronger one came up when moving around.

My ORBI doesn't have the option/feature of separate SSID's for 2.4 or 5G, just one for my network. Checking with my cellphone and WifiAnalyzer, it seems to just switch to the stronger signal seamlessly. My phone says I'm connected to my network, but WifiAnalyzer says I'm on 2.4 G outside and 5G inside. The change may not be instant, but that may be just lag of WifiAnalyzer.

BTW, if I didn't have to tweak my system, it probably would have taken me all of 10 minutes to get my Wifi going using the default settings once I finished reading the quickstart guide.

Just my 2 cents.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top