Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am getting ready for the maiden run with my new 60 gallon sprayer. It has 5 nozzles spaced at 30" on a 12' boom. With 30" spacing, the nozzle height above the crop canopy should be 30". So, I am thinking about re-plumbing and setting the nozzles at 20" spacing. This would allow me to lower the height of the sprayer down to 20". So, given the following factors:

  • Novice Operator
  • Small tractor
  • Four acres of gently sloping terrain (but not hilly)
  • A few holes here and there that I plan to fill in, but they do look a bit dangerous if I hit one with a full tank on terrain that slopes toward a hole that a rear tire dropped into.
  • I can keep the payload down to 30 or 40 gallons and adjust my chemical content so that one tank would cover one acre.
  • I can keep the speed down - I have lots of time.
So, what is the crowd wisdom? Should I just make the mods, or give it a go with the 30" spacing and see how it works? (30" puts the 3 point hitch just about all the way up.)

Re-plumbing would only cost about $60. (two nozzle bodies, and a set of smaller nozzles.). It seems like cheap insurance to reduce the risk of a rollover, but then maybe I'm overthinking this and the risk isn't that great. I will probably do all of the above: re-plumb, use a partial tank, and adjust my tank concentration so that I can keep the speed down around 2 MPH.

Thoughts? Additional advice?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
I am getting ready for the maiden run with my new 60 gallon sprayer. It has 5 nozzles spaced at 30" on a 12' boom. With 30" spacing, the nozzle height above the crop canopy should be 30". So, I am thinking about re-plumbing and setting the nozzles at 20" spacing. This would allow me to lower the height of the sprayer down to 20". So, given the following factors:

  • Novice Operator
  • Small tractor
  • Four acres of gently sloping terrain (but not hilly)
  • A few holes here and there that I plan to fill in, but they do look a bit dangerous if I hit one with a full tank on terrain that slopes toward a hole that a rear tire dropped into.
  • I can keep the payload down to 30 or 40 gallons and adjust my chemical content so that one tank would cover one acre.
  • I can keep the speed down - I have lots of time.
So, what is the crowd wisdom? Should I just make the mods, or give it a go with the 30" spacing and see how it works? (30" puts the 3 point hitch just about all the way up.)

Re-plumbing would only cost about $60. (two nozzle bodies, and a set of smaller nozzles.). It seems like cheap insurance to reduce the risk of a rollover, but then maybe I'm overthinking this and the risk isn't that great. I will probably do all of the above: re-plumb, use a partial tank, and adjust my tank concentration so that I can keep the speed down around 2 MPH.

Thoughts? Additional advice?
I would run it as is personally, it would take a deep hole to concern me. If I chickened out once getting to those holes I would just drive around them or lower sprayer to drive through them without much concern to my spray application in that particular spot. But that's me, I will do a lot to save myself from doing the work on the sprayer and spending $60.00

That's a nice looking sprayer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I would run it as is personally, it would take a deep hole to concern me. If I chickened out once getting to those holes I would just drive around them or lower sprayer to drive through them without much concern to my spray application in that particular spot. But that's me, I will do a lot to save myself from doing the work on the sprayer and spending $60.00

That's a nice looking sprayer!
Thanks - I am very happy with the quality of the sprayer.

It does seem sensible to at least give it a few runs before deciding if I should change things, or I might be solving a problem that I don't really have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
700 Posts
The iMatch, tank, spray equipment, and liquid weigh well over a thousand pounds. You have virtually no counterbalance forward of your loader. Then you have to account how much momentum a half-full tank, that weighs 500lbs, will have on your 1200lbs tractor in side-to side or front-to-back sloshing, in rough terrain. Is the 1025R even rated at the 3pt to lift that much?

Sorry, but that's just screaming 'accident waiting to happen'. :flag_of_truce:


At the very least, put your ROPS up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: keane

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
Thanks - I am very happy with the quality of the sprayer.

It does seem sensible to at least give it a few runs before deciding if I should change things, or I might be solving a problem that I don't really have.
That's my thoughts. I don't know your ground and your definition of a hole may be a complete washout that's waist deep but in general considering the width of your booms, if I was spraying and came to an area I believed I could tip over, I would drive around the hole. Overspraying a couple feet wouldn't concern me personally. I understand the concerns of tipping over, I have been on tractors my entire life and I have never had my nerves shaken on any of them in the ways compact and subcompact tractors has done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
The iMatch, tank, spray equipment, and liquid weigh well over a thousand pounds. You have virtually no counterbalance forward of your loader. Then you have to account how much momentum a half-full tank, that weighs 500lbs, will have on your 1200lbs tractor in side-to side or front-to-back sloshing, in rough terrain. Is the 1025R even rated at the 3pt to lift that much?

Sorry, but that's just screaming 'accident waiting to happen'. :flag_of_truce:


At the very least, put your ROPS up.
I believe your numbers are a bit off on the op's setup :flag_of_truce:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
That's my thoughts. I don't know your ground and your definition of a hole may be a complete washout that's waist deep but in general considering the width of your booms, if I was spraying and came to an area I believed I could tip over, I would drive around the hole. Overspraying a couple feet wouldn't concern me personally. I understand the concerns of tipping over, I have been on tractors my entire life and I have never had my nerves shaken on any of them in the ways compact and subcompact tractors has done.
If the weather is decent this weekend, I might load the sprayer with 30 gallons of water and make a few test runs with the boom at 20" and 30". If that seems comfortable, then I'll add another 10 gallons and see how it does with 40 gallons. It will also give me a feel for what speed works (meaning how slow can I go), in case I have to downsize my nozzles. I don't plan on exceeding about 2 mph. It would be helpful be able to to focus on the machinery and get some practical experience and data points without having to also think about the spraying that is going on.

My terrain is not rough - I am in the valley, so it isn't hilly. I have a few holes that are about 8" deep.

I'm assuming that I can counterweight the front end by loading the bucket with sandbags? It would probably be better to put weights on the front of the tractor, but I don't have any yet.

To the OP - good advice. I wouldn't even think about not using the ROPS and seatbelt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
Fill it with a few gallons of water and check your spray pattern on a driveway, you want some spray overlap. You also need to 'calibrate' your nozzles - place a container under each nozzle and measure the spray collected over one minute (or whatever), do this for each nozzle and then average the gallons per minute and use that for your calculations. If your tractor doesn't have a speed indicator, use a GPS so you can maintain whatever speed is necessary to put down the gallons per acre the label specifies.

You adjust the spray output with your bypass valve and pressure gauge. There will be a 'sweet' spot for pressure that provides good spray overlap without atomizing the liquid and blowing it all over the place.

I have a Texas private applicator license so I can purchase restricted herbicides - I had to learn all of the boom sprayer stuff for my exam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
I believe your numbers are a bit off on the op's setup :flag_of_truce:
I have a chart I made that has the weight of my "toys". I use it to determine tongue weight when I trailer my equipment. The 1025R weighs 1,444. The FEL is 624. Water is 8 lbs per gallon. I think the Imatch is about 50 lbs. If the setup gets at all to bouncing, steering will be an issue.

Sent from my SM-G900R4 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
If the weather is decent this weekend, I might load the sprayer with 30 gallons of water and make a few test runs with the boom at 20" and 30". If that seems comfortable, then I'll add another 10 gallons and see how it does with 40 gallons. It will also give me a feel for what speed works (meaning how slow can I go), in case I have to downsize my nozzles. I don't plan on exceeding about 2 mph. It would be helpful be able to to focus on the machinery and get some practical experience and data points without having to also think about the spraying that is going on.

My terrain is not rough - I am in the valley, so it isn't hilly. I have a few holes that are about 8" deep.

I'm assuming that I can counterweight the front end by loading the bucket with sandbags? It would probably be better to put weights on the front of the tractor, but I don't have any yet.

To the OP - good advice. I wouldn't even think about not using the ROPS and seatbelt.
I wouldn't be to worried, seems like you have a plan together that fits into your comfort level and it seems reasonable to me. What does the sprayer weigh empty? Around 150lbs or so? Factor in the iMatch and 30-40 gallons your probably around 460lbs? I believe your fine, if weight in the bucket gives you more confidence in your rig then add it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
... If the setup gets at all to bouncing, steering will be an issue.
This is certainly a concern, and I hope to moderate it via low speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
700 Posts
I believe your numbers are a bit off on the op's setup :flag_of_truce:



Ah, yes, they were off. :mocking:


The statement still stands though. Loader is mounted behind front axle, the sprayer sticks six feet past the rear axle. I suppose with a bucket of gravel it may cancel itself out. :good2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I wouldn't be to worried, seems like you have a plan together that fits into your comfort level and it seems reasonable to me. What does the sprayer weigh empty? Around 150lbs or so? Factor in the iMatch and 30-40 gallons your probably around 460lbs? I believe your fine, if weight in the bucket gives you more confidence in your rig then add it.
Yes, empty weight is 110 lbs; throw in 40 gallons of water, and it's up to about 450 lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
Ah, yes, they were off. :mocking:


The statement still stands though. Loader is mounted behind front axle, the sprayer sticks six feet past the rear axle. I suppose with a bucket of gravel it may cancel itself out. :good2:
I don't disagree with your statement at all. But the reality is we don't know the ground the OP is operating on, he does. He's already stated his planned speed, planned gallons of use, and his sprayer is shown in the photo. I'm not being argumentative at all, just hate to see some guys have a plan and headed in a direction to achieve it and then get bombed with posts from folks saying his setup is wrong or shouldn't be done. Don't get me wrong, if someone has a bad ideal this forum is great in the fact it could prevent a tragedy. However, sometimes I do believe things get a bit dramatic. I really believe the OP's tractor will handle 450lbs or so perfectly fine. He has already stated he is going to test things out with a lighter load to get a feel for the tractor and sprayer then adjust accordingly. Really seems to me the dude is on the right path and has a solid plan. That's my opinion though, others can and will vary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Fill it with a few gallons of water and check your spray pattern on a driveway, you want some spray overlap. You also need to 'calibrate' your nozzles - place a container under each nozzle and measure the spray collected over one minute (or whatever), do this for each nozzle and then average the gallons per minute and use that for your calculations. If your tractor doesn't have a speed indicator, use a GPS so you can maintain whatever speed is necessary to put down the gallons per acre the label specifies.

You adjust the spray output with your bypass valve and pressure gauge. There will be a 'sweet' spot for pressure that provides good spray overlap without atomizing the liquid and blowing it all over the place.

I have a Texas private applicator license so I can purchase restricted herbicides - I had to learn all of the boom sprayer stuff for my exam.
I have TeeJet AIC110 nozzles rated at .4 gpm. They give a nice pattern at 35 psi at a height of 30".

What are your thoughts on reducing down to an .25 gpm nozzle? Do you think that i will I get a good quality spray at 35-40 psi? (My goal is to be able to run at a lower speed with the smaller nozzle.)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Robnik and Levi

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Ah, yes, they were off. :mocking:


The statement still stands though. Loader is mounted behind front axle, the sprayer sticks six feet past the rear axle. I suppose with a bucket of gravel it may cancel itself out. :good2:
Ahhh.... so now I understand the difference between throwing some weight in the FEL and actually using frame mounted weights ahead of the front axle.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Levi and Robnik

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Ah, yes, they were off. :mocking:


The statement still stands though. Loader is mounted behind front axle, the sprayer sticks six feet past the rear axle. I suppose with a bucket of gravel it may cancel itself out. :good2:
The manual recommends 9x40 lb weights for front ballast on a 2305. I think that the 2305 is similar to the 1025R in size and weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
I've got a Fimco boom sprayer for my 2720. I added a pressure regulator and measured the flow rate of the nozzles so I could make a spreadsheet to calculate volumes and application rates.

My spreadsheet is at the link below:

Index of /images/2016_05_07_fimco_boom_sprayer

The image below shows what it calculates. If you know the pattern and GPM of your nozzles, you can customize the sheet to calculate fertilizer, herbicide, or pesticide to meet recommended application rates.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
I have TeeJet AIC110 nozzles rated at .4 gpm. They give a nice pattern at 35 psi at a height of 30".

What are your thoughts on reducing down to an .25 gpm nozzle? Do you think that i will I get a good quality spray at 35-40 psi? (My goal is to be able to run at a lower speed with the smaller nozzle.)
I would think so but you need to work out the gallons per acre required at what speed. With the smaller nozzles you might need to run too slowly. I'll try to find my notes so I can explain it more thoroughly, it's a bit complicated - at least for me.

When I spray my roads with Roundup, I don't do much planning or calculating because it's a safe herbicide - I drive at a speed where I get good leaf wetness and adjust the pressure for a good spray pattern. When I boom spray Surmount (for example), I'm super careful because it's a restricted herbicide and not safe if misapplied. I need to boom spray 2- 4D this spring and I'll take the time to figure out gallons per acre, etc., etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
Tagged for interest. I have a 40 gal. sprayer and 1 acre. And mine won't fit on the iMatch- a bit too small widthwise and to the top hook. :think:
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top