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I want to add a pasture gate in one of my fences. The gate will be for people and horses, not vehicles. I would prefer not to move or add any fence posts, just to work with the current ones. I'd rather spend a few days fabricating in the shop to a few hours digging new post holes.

Unfortunately the opening is 6'11", too wide for a stock 6 foot gate, and too small for a stock 8 foot gate. So my choices are to add width to a 6 footer, or to cut down an 8 footer.

6 foot 6ft.jpeg

8 foot 8ft.jpeg

Adding about 8 inches to a 6 footer would have the advantage of working on a gate without a center tube, and while cutting down an 8 footer and to get the center tube to remain in the middle would mean cutting pieces out of both sides.

The look of the end result is important because this gate will be about 20 feet away from our screened porch, where my wife spends a lot of time. That's mainly why I don't want to change the fence post spacing. Replacing the wife isn't an option, by the way.:laugh:

Any advice will be appreciated. I have a MIG welder and novice-level skills. No plasma cutter, but I do have a metal cutting bandsaw.
 

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What about building a gate, either welded tube or wooden?

If it doesn't have to swing both ways you can put the gate anchors in the back of the post instead of the side and lose a few inches, then the gate end will overhang the opposite post a bit.
 

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What about building a gate, either welded tube or wooden?

If it doesn't have to swing both ways you can put the gate anchors in the back of the post instead of the side and lose a few inches, then the gate end will overhang the opposite post a bit.
That is the beauty of this board. It had never crossed my mind to put the hinge pins in that way. Thanks.

The fence posts are 6" diameter, so if I can find a stock 8' gate that's really 7'6" that could work for me, and still look symmetrical to keep the wife happy.

My welding skills are not up to being able to be confident building a tube gate from scratch. To cut down a gate I was thinking about maybe cutting out sections of the 6 horizontal tubes, and inserting a plug of smaller diameter tubing in each one, and then welding it up.
 

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I like 56FordGuy's idea.

I have experience with this problem putting up baby gates for my grandchildren.

When my gate would not reach across the entire opening, I made the opening smaller by putting additional "posts" inside the original posts.

In your case, you could attach a 4X4 to each gate post on the inside of the opening, then mount the 6 foot gate in between these 4X4's. You'd have a couple of inches gap on each side of the gate, but that's not really big enough for anything to get through.
 

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Weld on a 6" pipe to the hinge side, gives you a stronger hinge mount and gains 6". Then space out the hinges from the post, this will give you about 2-3 more. Then down to a 2-3" gap on the chain side, which isn't bad.
 

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Totally adjustable...

Fence Gate.jpg

Picture doesn't really show it well but I used either 5/8" or 3/4" ready rod some 30 years ago. (They are still in use)
Edit: Better picture.
 

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What about building a gate, either welded tube or wooden?

If it doesn't have to swing both ways you can put the gate anchors in the back of the post instead of the side and lose a few inches, then the gate end will overhang the opposite post a bit.
Something like these work better than a screw in anchor as they wont turn on you...

31R3FbGSlnL.jpg
 

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Totally adjustable...

View attachment 467570

Picture doesn't really show it well but I used either 5/8" or 3/4" ready rod some 30 years ago. (They are still in use)
Edit: Better picture.
This is what we use also. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Overhang is good

What about building a gate, either welded tube or wooden?

If it doesn't have to swing both ways you can put the gate anchors in the back of the post instead of the side and lose a few inches, then the gate end will overhang the opposite post a bit.
For gates that we know only need to swing one way, I prefer to have a bit of an overhang on the latch post. It's particularly nice for working cattle because you can use it as a one way gate. Hang the gate so it swings on it's own toward the latch post and push cows through. Let the gate close behind you.

In your case, you have plenty of post and can play with the placement to make it look good.

Treefarmer
 
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