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I will be building a 24' x 42' tractor storage barn & repair building over the winter. The concrete floor pour is a major expense since not only do I have the cost of concrete @around $105 per cu. yard, but I also have the labor for pouring & finishing. So I was thinking that maybe instead of concrete I could use 2"x6" sleepers & cover over with 3/4 pressure treated plywood tongue & groove also if I can find it.

But then when I think about bringing in a tractor with wet or muddy tires, etc. the barn floor would always be a mess & hard to keep clean. What I'm trying to do is reduce my flooring costs overall, but nothing seems to be as good as old fashion concrete with a clear sealer topcoat. Anyone have any suggestions or actual experience with alternate flooring materials. And here in the south, I'm not worried about ground heaving or freezing. More concerned with wood eating insects, high humidity & the occasional black snakes that love to nest between floor joists & have a talent for burrowing under grade boards, etc. Thanks
 

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For an equipment building, I would avoid wood. I just don't like it. Moisture is an issue, maintenance is an issue, and it flexes. I can't stand a wood floor in a working building.

Could you do a compacted gravel floor for now, and have the concrete poured over it later? Or just leave the floor bare dirt and do gravel and concrete later on. Compacted gravel would be better than dirt, but if it's mostly for storage it wouldn't matter too much.
 

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For just tractor and implement storage a dirt floor is not bad. I have a pole barn with dirt floor that I use for this. When you bring in a tractor with tiller or box blade or anything else that's been used in the dirt, some is going to remain on it and fall off later in your building.:laugh:

With the dirt floor, unless it's really a lot, often you won't even notice.

For a shop for working in, I prefer concrete.

Just my $.025 (adjusted for inflation) :lol:
 

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My barn has a wood plank floor which I've had for 20+ years now. The main section is for parking our 2 vehicles plus the tractor in the winter. The shop is seperate in the rear. I'm just used to it I guess.

Things that I would like to do but can't - wash vehicles/equipment and also have never learned to weld as I can't be welding on a 100 year old dried out wood floor.

Dirt - i would avoid that myself. Not only moisture constantly coming out of the ground but I also work on vehicles and equipment where I have to lay on the floor.

Gravel - first thing comes to mind is not having the ability to roll stuff around like tool boxes, dollies/carts that hold some implements like my Heavy Hitch.

Maybe leave as dirt or gravel then plan to pour concrete in a year or two? Possibly cover the floor with horse mats in the meantime?
 

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On a 24x42 building I'd concrete the whole floor ASAP. If you have to reduce building costs only concrete what you can afford and plan on pouring the rest ASAP. Dirt, wood, gravel, grass were ALL things I was happy to be away from when working on equipment inside my first concrete floor shop.
 

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Agree with Powerstroke, concrete as much as possible especially where you plan on working on your eqpt. Then do the rest as you can afford or have the need.
 

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Because I have a barn with a dirt floor, if I ever build another shed or replace the barn I would pour the concrete floor first and then build as I could afford it. Been told I do some things backwards. But that's how important a concrete floor is to me. I hate a dirt floor. Dust gets everywhere and on everything. Kids love playing in it though.
 

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If you positively, absolutely can't do a concrete floor, at least do a concrete footing around the perimeter. That way you can pour a floor in the future without having to lift the building. IF you do go that route, you could fill the floor with stone dust and have it compacted. That would at least give you a hard/dry floor surface for now.
 

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If you positively, absolutely can't do a concrete floor, at least do a concrete footing around the perimeter. That way you can pour a floor in the future without having to lift the building. IF you do go that route, you could fill the floor with stone dust and have it compacted. That would at least give you a hard/dry floor surface for now.
In Virginia, we call stone dust "pug" or "mill run" depending on the quarry.

This spring, I put some in the area where we park the cars. then compacted it with a lawn roller.

The material is so tight, you could not poke a screwdriver in it!! :bigthumb:

The material is totally different than "57's",,, but, I think it needs to be dampened repeatedly to obtain full compaction/tightness.

The truck driver I use was leery about bringing it to me,,, it is a little hard to work with, and needs to be put down thicker than regular stone.

I did not have a problem, I have a machine that can move it.

 

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The pole barn at the farm had a dirt floor the first year. Only enough money for the barn that year. I could not believe how dirty/dusty everything was after setting in it all winter.
Concrete floor the next year, much cleaner.
 

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Thanks everyone for the advice. Based on all the threads here, Concrete has won hands down. No wood flooring for me. I will somehow work it out to coer the concrete costs. I will be broke...but happy. Thanks.

:lolol::bigbeer:
I've been broke or darn near broke for 50 years and I'm happy. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Thanks everyone for the advice. Based on all the threads here, Concrete has won hands down. No wood flooring for me. I will somehow work it out to cover the concrete costs. I will be broke...but happy. Thanks.
Good deal. This is one of those things that you really can't make a compromise.

Thinking about this thread - if I ever have to rebuild my 100 year old barn I would find a way to do the concrete or wait on the whole project until I could.
 

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Thanks everyone for the advice. Based on all the threads here, Concrete has won hands down. No wood flooring for me. I will somehow work it out to cover the concrete costs. I will be broke...but happy. Thanks.

:lolol::bigbeer:
If I may recommend something here; Call Jason, he is well versed on cement work!! :flag_of_truce:... and yes go the cement route, you may be broke afterwards but it will be worth it! Take Gizmos attitude about it.. That's what I do,, like my wife says; oh just do it... Then I give up something for the rest of the year! But not scotch or beer,, no way! Good luck with your barn floor. You really would be sorry with a wooden floor.. Think of this too, insurance companies frown on combustible flooring if you house anything that can leak and start a fire... They would probably not cover you.. Just sayin.. :bigbeer:
 

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Order more than you think you need and pay someone to finish it. :thumbup1gif:
 

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OH! Now you listen. :lol:
Diesel stated that because he found out it's not that easy of a project. Like I said in one of the posts regarding his floor, most people will not do that again.. It's bull work and can fry your nerves at times.. especially a yard short! That's why God made rocks! Throw them in to make up that yard or less... :lol: Kidding of course but I know it happens more then you may think!!! I caught a "contractor" filling up a sono tube with rocks just to save on mixing cement.. How well do you think that went over? :nunu:
 
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