Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, I think this is my first post here though I've been lurking for a good while.

So I just got my 1025r a few weeks back, and the loader works flawlessly for 3 of the operations (Curl, dump and raise). However when lowering the loader it moves fast and when I let go of the control the front end of the tractor bounces on it's springs madly.

The reason I'm posting is to ask a rather noobish question.

"Could this be related to lacking enough rear ballest?"

I've been trying to figure out what could be going on.

Anyway, please be kind if you can!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
What if any ballast are you using?
What if any loads do you have in the bucket?
As far as I know there is no suspension on the 1025 so you must be bouncing the tires.
A video would be most helpful.
Are you pushing the stick ALL the way forward past the detent? That puts it in float mode and will drop it like a rock.

And I'm by no means an expert, mostly a noob like you.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,195 Posts
Your tractor doesn't have any springs so it isn't bouncing on that.

When you are lowering your loader are you putting the joystick in the forward "lower" position? Or are you passing through the detent and allowing it to drop in float mode?
 
  • Like
Reactions: glc, rtgt and Tybio

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,485 Posts
"Could this be related to lacking enough rear ballest?"
Yes it can. However, even with a properly ballasted machine, quickly stopping the descent of a loaded bucket can bounce the tractor. Though, the bounce is from the front tires compressing and the rear tires unloading, as there are no springs.

If you're asking this question, I bet you already know the answer. Proper ballast for a machine for the task at hand is not something to take lightly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replys all, let me see if I can add info as requested:

1> Ballest: I have loaded rear tires, and I've noticed it when I have my home made carry all on the 3-point...while not heavy, it isn't light. Well over 100 pounds with the 80 of the carry all and all the lumber I've added too it.

2> Bucket is empty, no load...noticed it when re-positining with ratchet rake. Other than pushing brush I've no thad a meaningful load in the bucket just yet.

3> Float: I don't think so, I'm barely moving the stick forward and when I let it re-center it jerks.

Thanks for the correction on the springs guys! Guess I defaulted to "car thinking".

I'll get the tractor out tomorrow and load the carry-all up with everything I can find to see if that helps. If it doesn't I'll try to grab a video.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,624 Posts
2> Bucket is empty, no load...noticed it when re-positining with ratchet rake. Other than pushing brush I've no thad a meaningful load in the bucket just yet.



I'll get the tractor out tomorrow and load the carry-all up with everything I can find to see if that helps. If it doesn't I'll try to grab a video.
That seems a bit strange to me, a loaded bucket can catch all of us on occasion, doesn't take much pressure on the joystick to lower a loaded bucket, but an empty bucket is very easy to control.
I think the video will help clarify this greatly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,485 Posts
You got me curious so I just went out and played with my 3320. It's a heavier tractor than a 1025R and has loaded rear tires and >600 lbs. in a ballast box.
The front and rear tires are inflated to maximum and there are pallet forks and frame attached.

Moving the loader down gently, but stopping its descent fast, causes the tractor to "bounce" slightly. Moving the SCV to float mode and quickly lowering the loader boom and then halting its descent rapidly causes the tractor to bounce even more. It's not like it will knock you out of the seat, but it's pretty obvious.

Feathering the SCV transitions from down to quickly stopped with little noticeable bounce, but I can't say that I operate the tractor in that manner. I suppose I have just grown used to the various degrees of bounce.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
.

What pressure are you running the front tires at?
Egads, I didn't even think of that! I haven't checked...I was just so happy when it was delivered I started doing stuff. Whopse, that's not wise!

I'll check them, can't believe it didn't occur to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
You got me curious so I just went out and played with my 3320. It's a heavier tractor than a 1025R and has loaded rear tires and >600 lbs. in a ballast box.
The front and rear tires are inflated to maximum and there are pallet forks and frame attached.

Moving the loader down gently, but stopping its descent fast, causes the tractor to "bounce" slightly. Moving the SCV to float mode and quickly lowering the loader boom and then halting its descent rapidly causes the tractor to bounce even more. It's not like it will knock you out of the seat, but it's pretty obvious.

Feathering the SCV transitions from down to quickly stopped with little noticeable bounce, but I can't say that I operate the tractor in that manner. I suppose I have just grown used to the various degrees of bounce.
Perhaps it is just me having to adjust to the function, I am new at this!

I think a video will help and let people judge if it is my expectations that need to be adjusted or there is something going on :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,624 Posts
You got me curious so I just went out and played with my 3320. It's a heavier tractor than a 1025R and has loaded rear tires and >600 lbs. in a ballast box.
The front and rear tires are inflated to maximum and there are pallet forks and frame attached.

Moving the loader down gently, but stopping its descent fast, causes the tractor to "bounce" slightly. Moving the SCV to float mode and quickly lowering the loader boom and then halting its descent rapidly causes the tractor to bounce even more. It's not like it will knock you out of the seat, but it's pretty obvious.

Feathering the SCV transitions from down to quickly stopped with little noticeable bounce, but I can't say that I operate the tractor in that manner. I suppose I have just grown used to the various degrees of bounce.
You know, I’ll bet you’re on it.
I use my FEL a LOT, quite possible that we just become used to certain and don’t really notice after awhile.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,282 Posts
There is a remote chance that the restrictor/orifice is missing from the line with the blue cap. This is the line that allows the fluid to escape the lift/lower cylinders, the orifice helps keep the loader from falling to fast.

But, I would certainly check everything mentioned above (especially ballast and tires), including letting your dealer know you feel something is not correct and would like an experienced operator to try it for you.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,098 Posts
Tybio,

There is no such thing as a foolish or stupid question here on GTT. Don't ever feel you need to apologize for your newness to this equipment, everyone has to start somewhere. You are among friends here, and if you are respectful, you can expect the very same in return.

Today, I unloaded pallets from the back of a delivery truck and each pallet was between 500 and 700 pounds, right at the lifting limit of the tractor. Pictures of the pallets are shown below. Lifting these from the truck deck height, challenged the machines capabilities. I have a Mauser cab, which adds 400 pounds, plus I had my rear carry all and it weighed near 350 pounds today. I frequently change the weight on the carry all and it can vary from a light of 350 to a heavy of 850 pounds.

I knew I was light on the rear 3 point carry all when I started to lift the pallets. But after having done it hundreds if not more times, you develop a real feel for your machine. You will know when you need more ballast. Also, ballast is the number one issue with traction and snow removal. A properly ballasted machine will move several times the snow verses the tractor without the ballast.

Making a sudden movement with the FEL when it's above the hood height will cause the machine to react differently than when the FEL is close to the ground. This is all part of the learning process and comes with experience.

The round concrete cylinder in the photo below, is something I pulled out of the ground last weekend and now I will be using it for additional rear ballast. It weighs 455 pounds, but it is only 12" in diameter and 38 inches long. I plan to position this on my 3 point carry all where the buckets are shown in today's photo. I will secure it to the front wall of the carry all so it can't move. You may want to consider the same. You can make one of these cylinders for ballast for about $50 in a Soni Tube and bags of concrete. The soni tube is the cardboard tube on my carry all used to pour footings and set poles and posts, etc.

My carry all is in the middle of a project and it looks like a mess, because it is one........a mess, I mean. It's also a project in it's own right. Very handy and used all of the time, but lacks the organization I like.......

The pallets are the loads I took off the delivery truck today after I reloaded the pallets to create one pallet goes to each project site starting tomorrow. Each pallet is right at 400 to 495 pounds and that makes the tractor "bounce" and do all sorts of things when they move quickly. Don't forget to always carry the loads "LOW AND SLOW". There is no faster way to roll over one of these tractors than to carry loads in the FEL higher than necessary and to raise and lower the bucket when the tractor is turning and in operation.

You will get the hang of your machine and your GTT friends are here to help. Please make sure to post follow up comments and to let the members know if their suggestions or comments were helpful to you. Post pictures and complete your tractor signature so others are clear what equipment you have when they are answering your questions or giving advice. This prevents you from having to explain over and over what equipment you own and are using.

There are a lot of good people here, unlike many typical online forums. Good luck and we hope you find your time on GTT beneficial and rewarding.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Short answer is yes, lowering the loader and stopping it quickly will cause a bounce in the front if the tractor. I have had this happen before, it's just what happens when you have a weight cantilevered out in front of the machine. Proper tire press, rear weight and smooth operation of the loader will lessen bounce.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,686 Posts
I lurked her a long time after getting my 1025. I learned a lot still learning. Knowledgeable ( did I spell that right) people in here and they don't make fun of you much for dumb questions :thumbup1gif:
Been here for a while and I am still learning stuff. :good2:

We do sometimes poke fun at one another though.

Short answer is yes, lowering the loader and stopping it quickly will cause a bounce in the front if the tractor. I have had this happen before, it's just what happens when you have a weight cantilevered out in front of the machine. Proper tire press, rear weight and smooth operation of the loader will lessen bounce.
:good2:

#1 - Read you manuals regarding ballast. It is very important to understand why it is needed and what it does.

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/implements-attachments/4363-what-rear-ballast-why-do-you-need.html

Above is a link to a thread about ballast. It is a worthwhile read.

mopeman's post pretty much sums it up. If you have never operated a FEL before, take some time & practice. Try to see how smoothly you can move the loader by gradually moving the control lever. I would practice this with an empty bucket at first. Like others have said, weight in the bucket will make it even faster.

Each loader is different. When I upgraded to my current tractor it felt real touchy compared to my previous machine. It took some effort at first to smoothly move the bucket, but like all things, once I got used to it, it became second nature.

That said, if there is no way you can get the loader to move smoothly, then get it checked out. Could be as simple as the restrictor that KennyD posted.

:wgtt:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,629 Posts
Operator touch

Been here for a while and I am still learning stuff. :good2:

We do sometimes poke fun at one another though.



:good2:

#1 - Read you manuals regarding ballast. It is very important to understand why it is needed and what it does.

https://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/implements-attachments/4363-what-rear-ballast-why-do-you-need.html

Above is a link to a thread about ballast. It is a worthwhile read.

mopeman's post pretty much sums it up. If you have never operated a FEL before, take some time & practice. Try to see how smoothly you can move the loader by gradually moving the control lever. I would practice this with an empty bucket at first. Like others have said, weight in the bucket will make it even faster.

Each loader is different. When I upgraded to my current tractor it felt real touchy compared to my previous machine. It took some effort at first to smoothly move the bucket, but like all things, once I got used to it, it became second nature.

That said, if there is no way you can get the loader to move smoothly, then get it checked out. Could be as simple as the restrictor that KennyD posted.


:wgtt:
I agree with the above whole heartedly. Even for an experienced operator it takes a learning curve on a new machine to run it smoothly. If you are new to tractors and loaders the curve naturally takes more time and practice. That being said, if you aren't comfortable with what you are seeing and feeling, I'd get the dealer to send someone out. They may hope on the machine and tell you it's fine but they might say, oops somethings not right.

I'm sure Deere has a specification on how fast the loader should drop when the level is forward but probably only the factory or possibly a dealer can find that specification. If they are putting a restrictor in the system, there's obviously the potential to have it out of spec, either because the restrictor is missing or it has the wrong hole size. There's nothing wrong with asking the dealer to send someone out on a new machine. They should have given you some basic instruction with delivery including showing you all operations and cautions.

If the machine is set up and working correctly, it's up to you to learn to have the bucket come to a smooth stop instead of a slam bam. That's going to take time and practice but if you concentrate on smoothness, not speed eventually you will get both. Herky, jerky operation is hard on machines and a great operator can move everything quickly but feathers the controls just enough so stops and changes of direction are very controlled. It's like the difference between a person coming to a screeching stop and a limo driver that brakes gently enough to not spill the drink in the back seat. They both stop but one is much easier on the machine. Lean to be the limo driver and the speed will come.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I've had 3 tractors. The 1025's FEL was absolutely undependable. You never knew when it going to do a dump.

By comparison, the 2025's FEL is absolutely goof proof. The 4010's was similar, just slower.

Ralph
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
I agree with the above whole heartedly. Even for an experienced operator it takes a learning curve on a new machine to run it smoothly. If you are new to tractors and loaders the curve naturally takes more time and practice. That being said, if you aren't comfortable with what you are seeing and feeling, I'd get the dealer to send someone out. They may hope on the machine and tell you it's fine but they might say, oops somethings not right.

I'm sure Deere has a specification on how fast the loader should drop when the level is forward but probably only the factory or possibly a dealer can find that specification. If they are putting a restrictor in the system, there's obviously the potential to have it out of spec, either because the restrictor is missing or it has the wrong hole size. There's nothing wrong with asking the dealer to send someone out on a new machine. They should have given you some basic instruction with delivery including showing you all operations and cautions.

If the machine is set up and working correctly, it's up to you to learn to have the bucket come to a smooth stop instead of a slam bam. That's going to take time and practice but if you concentrate on smoothness, not speed eventually you will get both. Herky, jerky operation is hard on machines and a great operator can move everything quickly but feathers the controls just enough so stops and changes of direction are very controlled. It's like the difference between a person coming to a screeching stop and a limo driver that brakes gently enough to not spill the drink in the back seat. They both stop but one is much easier on the machine. Lean to be the limo driver and the speed will come.

Treefarmer
I'm with Treefarmer on this one. It sounds to me like you may still be in the learning curve. Challenge yourself to lower the bucket as slowly as possible. Get a feel for that.

In regard to rear ballast, tire weights or loaded rear tires really are not adequate when moving lots of weight with the front loader. Sure, that keeps the rear wheels from lifting off the ground, but tire weight does nothing to reduce the weight you are applying to your front axle. A ballast box will create a lever using your rear axle as a pivot point, thereby reducing the weight on your front axle.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top