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I plan on starting a new project soon, I have a Hobart 210 welder and would like to make a skid steer for my 3 point hitch. I will be using 4" square tubing and plate steel all with 1/4' thickness. I have my welder set up with Co2 gas but I also have .035 fluxcore wire. My question is which process to go with or is my welder to weak for this project?
 

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Are you running on 120 or 240 volts? If it's 120, the welder is too small. It can do it on 240 but it's at its limits. I have a Hobart 210 in my possession now to do some exhaust work with, I may make a pass or two on some 1/4" as well. I would like to use it to build a bumper out of 1/4" but I don't know if it's going to be able to produce a quality weld. Flux core will do a little better with penetration, but is going to be messy compared to solid wire. In any case, if you're running on 120 it won't be able to do a good job. It may look okay and there are thousands of welds that are complete crap but haven't broken, but I prefer to have more than faith and "metal tape" holding my stuff together. :laugh:
 

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Are you running on 120 or 240 volts? If it's 120, the welder is too small. It can do it on 240 but it's at its limits. I have a Hobart 210 in my possession now to do some exhaust work with, I may make a pass or two on some 1/4" as well. I would like to use it to build a bumper out of 1/4" but I don't know if it's going to be able to produce a quality weld. Flux core will do a little better with penetration, but is going to be messy compared to solid wire. In any case, if you're running on 120 it won't be able to do a good job. It may look okay and there are thousands of welds that are complete crap but haven't broken, but I prefer to have more than faith and "metal tape" holding my stuff together. :laugh:
I put a 50amp service in my garage for this machine. I don't mind the spatter of FCAW it's the color of my boogers when I'm done. Thanks for the response.
 

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If you have gas and solid wire I would recommend using that. You will get a much cleaner weld than with flux core. I have to do my welding outside so I must use flux core. It works okay but there is just no comparison to a nice clean weld with shielding gas.
 

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If you have gas and solid wire I would recommend using that. You will get a much cleaner weld than with flux core. I have to do my welding outside so I must use flux core. It works okay but there is just no comparison to a nice clean weld with shielding gas.
Thanks for the response, all of my previous experience has been with a lite duty welder. So far with this new welder using gas has been good. But this will be the most advanced project for me. athe stress on my welds will be much different and I am just unsure of the ability with a 210 wire feed welder.
I have .035 solid wire that I bought from Usa Weld, it's HTP and I bought a 2 pack of 10lb wheels for 40 bucks, one .023 and one .035, nice wire for the price and prompt service.
 

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Thanks for the response, all of my previous experience has been with a lite duty welder. So far with this new welder using gas has been good. But this will be the most advanced project for me. athe stress on my welds will be much different and I am just unsure of the ability with a 210 wire feed welder.
I have .035 solid wire that I bought from Usa Weld, it's HTP and I bought a 2 pack of 10lb wheels for 40 bucks, one .023 and one .035, nice wire for the price and prompt service.
You shouldn't have any problems at all. According to the setup sheet inside the lid he 210 can do 1/4" steel with .035 wire and CO2 when running on 220V. Just watch your duty cycle as I believe the 210 is rated for 30% at 150A.

I mostly use a stick welder for thicker material but I also have a little Hobart 140 that runs on 120V. I use .035 flux core on it. Before I had the stick welder I used the little 140 on 1/4" steel. I just had to make multiple passes and it worked fine.
 

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Argon/CO2 and solid wire, or flux core w no gas, one or the other. Polarity at your welder is usually different depending on gas or flux core. Make sure you clean the metal really really well. Make sure where you clamp it with the welder lead is as close to the work as possible and that area is clean too. This will create a loop that had the least amount of Ohms and maximize your amperage in that loop for the applied voltage across you welder leads. the difference between 220volts vs 110 volts is that the lower voltage requires approx double the current to deliver the same amount a power. This causes some slight increased losses due to the resistance of the power cord and some internal resistance and eddy currents(circulating currents) in your unit. In a high quality welder with a proper gauge cord, it becomes less of an issue but if your on the edge of pushing a machine it could be an issue. I have the Millermatic 211 and go to flux if I run out of gas. Flux is fine, just a little more to clean up the weld when done. Gas will spoil you once you start using it, very little clean up.
 

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Do a test weld. I would suspect most of your joints will be 90 degree T joints with either weld on both sides or end welding the square tube. Take some scrap, make a T joint and weld one pass on one side, an inch will do. Then put it in a vice and try to break it, a small sledge or even a good size wrench with a cheater will do trying to fold it toward the weld not away. Examine the weld and how it failed. If it breaks down the center of the weld then its ok or tears out a chunk of base metal then OK. If you can't break it then OK. What you don't want is the weld material to break away from the base = not enough penetration. 220 VAC input, 30% duty cycle you should be OK but it will take awhile.

I was a structural steel (rod burner) / pressure vessel welder (real welder LOL) back in the day (late 70's).
 
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