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I forgot there are people on here that take great delight in being condescending to others. I removed the post to make them happy.
 

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This comes up fairly often on here. I personally think the issue is over-blown but I can see why people get irked too.

If I buy a left over 2016 car in 2017 it is new but it still a 2016. Why isn't this the same for tractors?

Thanks for any help on this but I think a customer should have the right to know the mfg year of any equipment he/she is buying...........:gizmo:
It isn't the same for tractors because tractor manufacturer's aren't using the same sales gimmicks that car manufacturer's are using. The folks that make cars have convinced us that buying the newest model year means you are getting something "better". You're buying the "latest and greatest". Even if you aren't. For the car maker, the "model year" is a big deal because they made it a big deal. And they try to convince us that it's a big deal as a sales gimmick.

Tractor manufacturers rely on serial number break (for minor changes) or model number changes (for major changes) to signify when they make a change to a tractor, not the model year. They don't really care about model years at all.

So let's change up your question a little here. You walk onto a dealer's lot and they have two identical 2018 Ford Mustangs that you are interested in. One was built in Dec 2017. The other was built in Jan 2018. Do you care? A 2018 Ford Mustang is a 2018 Ford Mustang, isn't it?

And even if you did care and bought the one that was built in Jan 2018, do you check to see when the engine that is in that car was built? Or when the tires were made? Or when the bolts that hold the whole thing together were made? Would you be upset of you bought a 2018 car and found out that the engine it it was built in 2017?
 

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Last june I purchase a 2038R and was told it would be a 2017. They had the MMM on hand and he tagged it that day then come to find out I had a 8 month wait because of the radial tires. They had one on hand with out radials but it was the one they took to several county fairs. it had 8 hours showing but my main concern was all the people crawling on it. I decided to wait. well 6 months later mine came in early?? and it was a 2018. they put the deck on it and its in my garage. My feeling is that when I am gone and my wife is selling it it will be listed has a 2018 2038R with loader and mower. No one is going to crawl done and check the serial number on the mower. I think what matters is the year of the tractor.
 

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Agreed Jim.

In all my years I have never seen model years of tractors causing any concern until recently on this forum.
Ok... so the year-date obsession lately is not just my imagination.
 

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I must have missed that thread.
I have found that GTT is the most courteous forum I have ever read.
I'm sorry that someone may have been obtuse with you.
 

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I forgot there are people on here that take great delight in being condescending to others. I removed the post to make them happy.
I’m sorry you feel this way. If you feel like you’ve been disrespected in a thread or post, please report it so the staff can respond and deal with it accordingly. It’s completely anonymous and easy.

But, I’ll give you a tiny bit of advice. Written word can easily be taken out of the context it was written in. You could be reading into a post thinking it was meant another way. It happens very often. Try to give a little leeway or the benefit of the doubt until it’s really obvious. I’m not saying that’s what happened in the past or now, but it happens often. That’s forums. That life online on the internet. It’s unfortunate, but it’s the reality.

Feel free to contact me if you’d like to discuss this or anything else. :hi:
 

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I forgot there are people on here that take great delight in being condescending to others. I removed the post to make them happy.
I wish you wouldn't have removed it. It is a legitimate question. While such a standard black book doesn't readily exist for tractors, NADA & KBB consider the year of the item to be a key consideration. This can be said of cars, boats, ATV's, campers, etc. Additionally, bank lending rates are dependent upon the year of the proposed financed item. One year can make a difference of a half a point or more in rate or even be the difference between being "financable" or not.

Additionally, if I recall your original post accurately, I totally agree with the thought of wanting something brand new to be brand new. If it isn't and it's been sitting on the lot for a year in the elements, then I'd like to know and be able to use that as a bargaining chip on price. At least I'd have the option then to determine how I want to proceed. The tractor I just purchased for myself was on the lot for awhile. They had to replace several trim pieces that were showing signs of discoloration or corrosion from just hanging out in the elements for all that time.

A smart buyer considers resale value with every significant purchase he makes. Times change, needs change, wants change. One thing's for sure, nothing ever stays the same.

Maybe I should just remove the year from all the tractors I sell since it ain't no thang! :lol::lol::lol:
 

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I hope my input wasn't taken to be mean or obnoxious.
 

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I hope my input wasn't taken to be mean or obnoxious.
Drifterbike, you are the last person I would say would be offensive. As others have said I think people for the most part and especially the regular posters on this forum have no interest in being rude, just helpful.

As far as the year, I suppose it matters for the first 10 years but after that a 3020 is a 3020, a 70 a 70 or a 6130 a 6130.
 

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Written word can easily be taken out of the context it was written in.
This
I didn't see the exchange in question but I've had to read something a few times occasionally and try to assess intent. I think, for the most part, no ill intent is present other than my potentional misinterpretation of a written post. It happens to me in text messages at times also and I have to remind myself that unless a glaring example presents itself, its likely not what I first see. I try to be polite at all times but do have it in me to call someone out for blatantly disrespecting another. I see no need for that. I feel like we are all here to help first and learn second. :hi:

Oh, and for what its worth, I'm of the opinion that if something is advertized as "new" I have the right to expect exactly that and will respect a dealer who is transparent and discloses the history to me so I am aware of what I am buying. Implements don't concern me as much unless I'm after something specific such as an auto connect deck that falls on one side of a date range. I have a 2007 Lund 18 foot fishing boat with a 90 HP Merc 4 stroke that was manufactured in 2006. I wasn't thrilled when I found out, when I needed the tag info for something because I bought it new, but my boat was built in Jan of 07 and the motor was Nov of 06 so I can see where this could happen. In fairness, it changes nothing but if I were to sell it, I'd have to list the years of each and explain it. The dealer should have too also.
 

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This comes up fairly often on here. I personally think the issue is over-blown but I can see why people get irked too.



It isn't the same for tractors because tractor manufacturer's aren't using the same sales gimmicks that car manufacturer's are using. The folks that make cars have convinced us that buying the newest model year means you are getting something "better". You're buying the "latest and greatest". Even if you aren't. For the car maker, the "model year" is a big deal because they made it a big deal. And they try to convince us that it's a big deal as a sales gimmick.

Tractor manufacturers rely on serial number break (for minor changes) or model number changes (for major changes) to signify when they make a change to a tractor, not the model year. They don't really care about model years at all.

So let's change up your question a little here. You walk onto a dealer's lot and they have two identical 2018 Ford Mustangs that you are interested in. One was built in Dec 2017. The other was built in Jan 2018. Do you care? A 2018 Ford Mustang is a 2018 Ford Mustang, isn't it?

And even if you did care and bought the one that was built in Jan 2018, do you check to see when the engine that is in that car was built? Or when the tires were made? Or when the bolts that hold the whole thing together were made? Would you be upset of you bought a 2018 car and found out that the engine it it was built in 2017?
The designation of a model year in the auto industry is regulated by federal rules. The actual model year is longer than the calendar year. Traditionally new model years for autos started in September. Now that's kind of all over the map as we see new model releases a various times of the year these days. Also in the auto industry the model year is tied to federal regulations governing safety, emissions, etc.

I think for tractor buyers, who are not reliant upon tractors for their livelihood like most of us on this forum, then model year is a consideration. This is because that's how the manufacturers market the machines to the general public. Much easier to advertise a "2018" vs "Serial Number 100xxxx".

I agree that the tractor industry follows serial number break and model number changes. I know when I traded in my 2210 the salesman went to the serial number first after looking at my total hours on the machine. He then took that information and went to his price guide book so he could value my trade. He didn't really care about the year it was made.

For the average buyer I think model year is the way to track these things unless there is an issue/modification at a particular serial number break that a buyer should track. It's just easier, but a buyer should know that tractors have long model runs so 3025e made in 2018 is likely to virtually same tractor 4 years later. As far as getting hung up on expecting a 2017 and getting a 2016 when their the same, that's an individual issue and speaks whether the buyer trusts the dealership etc. Those disclosures should be made up front and if they aren't then it should be a moment of pause, not necessarily killing the deal. I see both sides of that fence.
 

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Voice inflection. Often on written word, you can never really tell what someone means or how to take it.
Spoken in person it can be a whole different ballgame.

:greentractorride:
 

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Those disclosures should be made up front and if they aren't then it should be a moment of pause, not necessarily killing the deal. I see both sides of that fence.
It all boils down to this. If someone's playing hide the ball on me, I'm not going to get a fuzzy feeling about this or future dealings with them. I shoot straight with people and expect the same in return. I don't think its too much to ask. (Well, maybe today it might be but that's a whole other story)
 

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For the average buyer I think model year is the way to track these things unless there is an issue/modification at a particular serial number break that a buyer should track. It's just easier, but a buyer should know that tractors have long model runs so 3025e made in 2018 is likely to virtually same tractor 4 years later. As far as getting hung up on expecting a 2017 and getting a 2016 when their the same, that's an individual issue and speaks whether the buyer trusts the dealership etc.
If I recall, the issue was someone buying a "2018" tractor and then finding out the mower deck and snow blower were "2017" models.
 

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I think that the OP asked a legitimate question about the model years of the tractors or other equipment. When it comes to tractors, like the SCUTS and CUTS and Lawn and Garden tractors, you will often see the mention of the model year when the item is being sold the first time by the dealer. But when these items come up for "resale", often you don't see any mention of the model year in the item listing.

In fact, you have to go to the serial number references to often determine which model year the tractor truly is.

Our "road vehicles" depreciate by a combination of "model year" (age) and miles on the odometer. But tractors are much more "hour of use" driven in their used equipment valuation. If you look at the "Tractor House" or "Machinery Pete" or whatever that is called, and you see where the dealers are selling several of the same model tractor used, the number of hours on them usually is the driving force in the different values being asked for by the seller if the tractors are all equipped the same.

When you are buying something "new" from a dealer, you have every right to expect a "new" model. Is a 2017 worth less than a 2018 of the same model machinery, if both have 0 hours on them? A lot of that depends upon the buyer. For example, I personally don't care for some of the "changes" made to the 2018 1025R, including having to have a "tool" to open the hood, verses simply moving the small lever in the grill. So in my case, I wanted a 2017 last late October when I bought my tractor and the 2018's were just starting to come into the dealer inventory. In fact, when I was waiting for my cab installation, etc. the new 2025R came in and it was a 2018. I posted a bunch of photo's of it on here.......................

When it comes to implements, I personally don't care about their "model year". I just want them to be "like new" in condition if it is being sold to me as "new". I understand the occasional "chip" on the box blade or other such issues because of the way the implements are palleted, banded and shipped. Sell me the implement and throw in some implement touch up paint and we will be good. It's hard to use a ground engaging implement and NOT get a nick or scratch on it.

Another issue which often comes up in this same discussion is the condition of the tractor upon delivery. And as we would expect, we see two entirely different camps of opinions on that issue. Some say "It's just a tractor and if it's got a scratch or ding, oh well." I can tell you that's NOT how I see it and I know there are a post or three I have written on this subject. Personally, I feel when the dealer is delivering something as "NEW", it had better be NEW and look like it just came off the assembly line. I wouldn't accept delivery of something that was scratched or dirty or damaged, unless that is specifically my understanding when we agreed upon the price and that price would be measurably discounted from "retail".

On that note, I was in my area Honda motorcycle dealership earlier this year to get some parts for my Honda generator. They had a BRAND NEW, 0 miles, 2012 Motorcycle on the showroom floor and they were still asking near the "new" price for it. As far as I am concerned, it's a nearly 7 year old motorcycle that just doesn't have any miles on it. It's worth only what the value is for any other 2012 motorcycle of the same make and model with low miles on it.

Another thing I have always found a bone of contention with "New Vehicle Dealers" is that they place a lot higher value on their "Demo's" than they would give me for the same make, model and miles on a vehicle I had purchased. They will say, "Well, its never been titled, so it's still new...."

One of my neighbors is the business manager at the local Chevy, GMC, Buick dealership. He has like 5 kids under 7 years old and he always gives his wife the top of the line Suburban or GMC equivalent to drive as her "Demo". So, they climb all over the inside of the $78,000 truck and eat their McMeals inside of it and get their greasy fingerprints on the leather (or "pleather" :laugh::laugh:) and when it's time for her to get a different truck every 4 or 5 months, they put the "Demo" on the lot, with about $3,000 off the sticker price. That's complete BS as far as I am concerned. It's a USED TRUCK at that point and worth what any other vehicle of the same make, model and options is worth with those miles on it. You can't tell me the "depreciating factor" on a vehicle is whether it's been titled to someone or run on a dealer plate. It's the use of the vehicle and the miles put on it.

Funny thing is another of my neighbors OWNS the local Ford dealership. He NEVER is driving the latest high end models, nor is his family. They are always driving either a used car from the lot or sometimes even the "Loaner cars" from the service department. That is how I would do it, as well. Having the top of the line SUV used as a "Jungle Jim" by the managers wife and kids is something I wouldn't tolerate if it were my dealership........but that's just me.

Same thing with the annual fleet of Mercedes Benz cars and SUV's which are used during our local PGA tournament, which is going on RIGHT NOW..............in a couple of weeks, they will advertise these cars for a thousand or two off the sticker price and then tell you that "So and So" drove that SUV during the tournament, like I give a ****........Miles are miles and I don't care if someone thinks they are a "celebrity", it means nothing to me. They are used vehicles as far as I am concerned.

As DrifterBike commented about the tractor he wanted. The model the dealer had had some hours on it and it had been at the local fairs, etc. with people crawling all over it and kids bouncing on the seat. NO THANKS...........I will wait for NEW.., unless he is willing to reduce the price on the "new" demo model to that of a used piece of equipment, as that is really what it is at that point.
 

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Well, I purchased a 2018 2038r that has a 2019 date code :laugh: Figure that one out!!
 

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Well, I have to assume here that it was my comments were seen as being condescending. I assure you, USAFRet, that was never my intent and I apologize if my comments seemed to be doing that.


For the average buyer I think model year is the way to track these things unless there is an issue/modification at a particular serial number break that a buyer should track. It's just easier, but a buyer should know that tractors have long model runs so 3025e made in 2018 is likely to virtually same tractor 4 years later. As far as getting hung up on expecting a 2017 and getting a 2016 when their the same, that's an individual issue and speaks whether the buyer trusts the dealership etc. Those disclosures should be made up front and if they aren't then it should be a moment of pause, not necessarily killing the deal. I see both sides of that fence.
I see both sides of it too and that's why I said originally that I can see why it irks people. For those of us who didn't grow up around tractors, I think it's pretty easy to fall into the "tractor/implement model year = car/truck model year" thinking. They both have engines, etc... and are operated in a similar way so it seems kinda natural. It takes asking the question as people do on here to figure out that they aren't and that the model year of tractors and implements don't hold the same meaning as they do with our cars/trucks.

But I also think when we look at the date an implement was manufactured there is an assumption that if it isn't a "current year" model, it must have been sitting on a dealer's lot exposed to the weather. That might be true. But it might not. I tend to look at the condition of the implement itself. If it's sun faded, then yeah, it probably sat out on the lot. And if that's what I got delivered from my dealer I'd probably be pissed.

But if I watch them go out to the warehouse with a forklift and pull down a crate with the implement still in the factory packaging I don't give the year it was made much thought. Even if it's a year or two old, in my head it's still "brand new".

I know what year my 2032R was built but I've never even looked to see if the loader that came with it was built in the same year. I didn't even pop into my head to consider that until I re-read this thread this morning. IAFAIK, the loader was "new" when it was delivered. It wasn't faded and didn't have any scratches on it. Maybe it's the same year, maybe it isn't. :dunno:
 

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Well, I purchased a 2018 2038r that has a 2019 date code :laugh: Figure that one out!!
I would drive it right back to the dealer and demand restitution!

Then again, keep an eye on all the fasteners since it hasn't been built yet. :)
 

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I will give you a thumbs up :bigthumb:

or like or whatever 'cuz I like your avatar. Shelties are cool!
 
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