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Hi all, I'm new to the JD forum. It looks like it is full of good info and good people. I'm hoping to get a little advice about my oil leak issue. I have a new to me 2008 1026r with 600hrs on it. I parked it in the garage used it for a few hours and then noticed a few days later that it was leaking oil. I have investigated this leak and what I found was a half dozen loose bolts holding the right rear tranny case together. I've marked the picture with red dots identifying the lose bolts. The oil is leaking from the the top half of the right side housing (circled in yellow in pic). The JD shop says $1600 to open and re seal. Has anyone tackled this themselves? Are there any special tools needed. Can it be done in place? Or does the whole tranny rear end have to come out. I've noticed that the frame parts will have to come off. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. 20180404_093856.jpg


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Might want to call the dealer and ask about this. I didn't read the entire thread but there was a known issue with missing bolts on the 1026R and a recall. Maybe the recall was performed but not correctly or something. Might be worth a shot to further look into.

http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/2997-1026r-transmission-bolt-recall.html

I also agree to get a TM. Personally I like the CD version. It is cheaper and I have a computer in the shop. Besides for how much cheaper it is, I can print out a lot of pages needed if I want a copy that I can hold. If they get greasy I can toss them and print out new pages. Can't go wrong with either one though.
 

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Might want to call the dealer and ask about this. I didn't read the entire thread but there was a known issue with missing bolts on the 1026R and a recall. Maybe the recall was performed but not correctly or something. Might be worth a shot to further look into.

http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/2997-1026r-transmission-bolt-recall.html

I also agree to get a TM. Personally I like the CD version. It is cheaper and I have a computer in the shop. Besides for how much cheaper it is, I can print out a lot of pages needed if I want a copy that I can hold. If they get greasy I can toss them and print out new pages. Can't go wrong with either one though.
sennister--i have a question about the recall--would jd still fix the tractor after all this time?
reason i'm asking is because of all the flack i went thru on my 3pt arms-now jd did offer me a $100 towards a $636 bill. for the 2 of them. just wondering if there's a shutoff time period:dunno:
 

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Splitting tractors is not an hard job- time consuming, but not hard to split. The hard part is fixing the internal issues. If you have to split it, you should only need normal hand tools and a couple of floor jacks. To put it back together, get a few cheap bolts that match the threads on the tranny case and cut the heads off so that you can align the halves easier.

That said, I have no idea if you need to split it or not, but if you do, don't be afraid of it.
 

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Splitting tractors is not an hard job- time consuming, but not hard to split. The hard part is fixing the internal issues. If you have to split it, you should only need normal hand tools and a couple of floor jacks. To put it back together, get a few cheap bolts that match the threads on the tranny case and cut the heads off so that you can align the halves easier.

That said, I have no idea if you need to split it or not, but if you do, don't be afraid of it.
...and if it doesn't come back together easily, don't force it by tightening the bolts. Insure that everything is aligned and engaged and it should roll together easily.
 

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I can't answer your questions, but I'll offer my opinion (which is usually free :laugh:)

If it were me, I would try to fix the leak with the tranny in place ... if I could reach all the bolts easily.

You may not have to entirely remove the whole case cover, maybe just enough (1/4 to 1/2 inch) to clean and re-RTV the seal. In many cases, there is no gasket, just sealing compound. I am also assuming that your can do this while still on the tractor. If you have to take the tranny out or it has an actual gasket, then clean it up and fix it right.

It appears from your pics that the leak is not trivial, if it were just a drop or two every week or so, I could consider leaving it alone and check hydro fluid level from time to time.

Good luck and let us know how you make out.

One other thing, you said you have a 2008 1026R, I thought the first ones came out in late 2011.

Just my 2 cents.
 
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I can't answer your questions, but I'll offer my opinion (which is usually free
)

If it were me, I would try to fix the leak with the tranny in place ... if I could reach all the bolts easily.

You may not have to entirely remove the whole case cover, maybe just enough (1/4 to 1/2 inch) to clean and re-RTV the seal. In many cases, there is no gasket, just sealing compound. I am also assuming that your can do this while still on the tractor. If you have to take the tranny out or it has an actual gasket, then clean it up and fix it right.

It appears from your pics that the leak is not trivial, if it were just a drop or two every week or so, I could consider leaving it alone and check hydro fluid level from time to time.

Good luck and let us know how you make out.

One other thing, you said you have a 2008 1026R, I thought the first ones came out in late 2011.

Just my 2 cents.
Yep...this is what id do. Get the seam apart just enough to get it good and CLEAN (no oil or old silicone) and pack in some sealant, and bolt it back together.

If you're looking for excellent sealant, get a tube of Yamabond 4, it's a cult favorite for sealing cases, etc, and I think better than rtv silicone.
 

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sennister--i have a question about the recall--would jd still fix the tractor after all this time?
reason i'm asking is because of all the flack i went thru on my 3pt arms-now jd did offer me a $100 towards a $636 bill. for the 2 of them. just wondering if there's a shutoff time period:dunno:
It is hard to say. First off was it a recall or a service bulletin. Two very different things. The key difference is a recall is an issue that has been discovered that typically is a safety issue. A service bulletin, technical bulletin or something along those lines are guides that a manufacturer will put out about a known issue that is cropping up with a machine. For my X585 there was a bulletin that was released for my SN range where they found that the dash can exhibit strange behavior. This was traced back to the way they secured the ground for the dash not being adequate. Not having a functioning dash isn't a safety issue, they addressed the concern in later SN range machines but they release a bulletin to the dealers so that they can save time and money trying to diagnose a condition that has been seen and resolved by others.

The big difference is a Service Bulletin is not going to be a free fix. If you are out of warranty and you take it in for the issue, it might save you a bit of diagnostic time (provided the dealer even bothers to look for a bulletin) but all repair work is on your dime.

A recall is fixed in or out of warranty at no cost to the owner. Normally there isn't a time limit on a recall unless the recalled item is also considered a wear item. I am trying to think of an example. Just making something up along with numbers for an example here. Lets say there was a recall on a Diesel Particulate Filter. They send out the notices that this item is being recalled and the recall process is to replace the DPF but the owner ignores the recall. Lets say the documented "service life" for the DPF is 10 years/2000hrs. The owner strolls in 12 years and 5000hrs later with a bad DPF and asks to have it replaced under warranty. Well you are way beyond the documented realistic service life so it is going to be a harder fight. In the case of strolled in and having some bolts missing, well something like that shouldn't have an age/time limit. Same thing if it was a design flaw in maybe a seat belt. It doesn't matter, it was recalled and it hasn't been addressed yet so they fix it.

I guess that is another difference between the two. A recall involves notification to the registered owner. Maybe you bought the machine used, as discussed in other threads there is no DMV type registration for a tractor so it isn't like JD can contact each state and ask for a list of owners for _____. So they can go by the registered owner and send out a post card. Maybe they moved or since they sold it and maybe don't know how to contact the new owner they just toss the card. I know JD sent me a sticker to put in my owners manual for my Z950R because they changed the wording on something. They just sent it to who was the registered owner. Since I bought it new from them that was me. With service or technical bulletins there is no requirement to notify owners. Sometimes we just figure these things out in forums talking to people. That was the case with the dash issue on my X585. I wasn't the original owner, I got it from my Father-in-law when we bought their house. If they would have sent notice we would have still gotten it. They are not required to do this. We happened to take it into the dealer for this issue. My now ex-dealer was too lazy to look for at bulletin and preformed all kinds of work on the machine which had nothing to do with the issue. I have a new dealer now.

Getting back to the original poster and the issue at hand with the transmission leak. We are not sure these are the same bolts. Lets pretend they are. The bolts are there so one could argue that if this machine fell in the SN range of what might be a recall (not totally confirmed yet), but at some point someone may have added the missing bolts. If it was done under a recall it should be documented in the maintenance records. I would start by asking a dealer if they can find this recall (if it was one) and if they can see if the recall work has been completed on this machine. If the answer is yes, see if you can find what the recall procedure was. Normally this is a very well documented step by step process. Again, lets pretend that the bolts that are leaking are part of the recall and are now in place. Was the process to just install missing bolts or did it involve removing this cover and resealing it. One could argue that operating the machine with the loose bolts could compromise the seal and simply adding the bolts at a later point wouldn't be good enough. So if the stars align and these are the same bolts and possibly documented procedures were potentially not followed, I would be on the phone with JD Customer Service and see what they can do. It really won't be a dealer decision. At best if you are good at presenting the case they might cover it. They also might say we will split it 50/50. Well then it is up to the OP. Complete job was estimated at $1600. If they can agree to a 50/50 split maybe the OP is willing to spend $800 to have them do it because of the time, effort and mess. I sure would consider it. They may only offer $100 toward the work. It is hard to say unless he does his homework.

Everyone has a line that they must decide on. Do you have the tools/shop/skillset to perform a job vs what I would pay someone else to do it. I had that with my well a few weeks ago. Once the pressure tank, pressure switch, power and everything in the house had been eliminated it became apparent that it was an issue with either my well pipe, pump or both. I threw in the towel. Could I have pulled the pump myself. Maybe. Would I have been able to do it in the 2 hrs it took the professional with the right tools? Nope. $1150 and 2 hrs later I had a new well pump installed. I just stood there watching after I made a road for him through the snow.
 

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If you're looking for excellent sealant, get a tube of Yamabond 4, it's a cult favorite for sealing cases, etc, and I think better than rtv silicone.
I have been using Yamabond #4 since the late 1970's. Nothing beats it in my book. It is made & sold by Yamaha dealers.
 
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If you're looking for excellent sealant, get a tube of Yamabond 4, it's a cult favorite for sealing cases, etc, and I think better than rtv silicone.
I have been using Yamabond #4 since the late 1970's. Nothing beats it in my book. It is made & sold by Yamaha dealers.
Yep, it rocks, I like the way it smells too!

I bought a tube on Amazon recently for a good price.
 
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I'd utilize whatever the Technical Manual specifies. For some things they specify Loctite High flex Form-in-Place Gasket (Loctite item# 38657) Other things call for silicone RTV. If the latter, I usually apply the bead and then let it cure until it starts to skin (usually 30 minutes). In this manner, it does "squish out" so readily.
 

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Even though the MSDS says it is a silicon RTV, it sure is different from any other RTV that I have used over the years. Its not as viscous - kind of runny, has a tendency to form 'threads' when removing the tube from whatever you are applying it to, sets up different - harder, but not brittle or rubbery.

The MSDS looks like it is actually made by Three Bond Corp, as part #TB1215 - "Liquid Gasket - Gray Solventless Silicone Sag Type"

All I know is that it works darn well. It says that it is heat, oil and gear-oil resistant.
 

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get a tube of Yamabond 4, it's a cult favorite for sealing cases, etc, and I think better than rtv silicone.
FYI, Yamabond is RTV Silicone.

Al
I should have said "typical rtv silicone", like Permatex. It may be a silicone based gasket, but it seems to use a different curing agent, and just seems to hold up better. At any rate, for sealing a seam on a housing, water pump, oil cover...it's what I'd use.
 
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The MSDS looks like it is actually made by Three Bond Corp, as part #TB1215 - "Liquid Gasket - Gray Solventless Silicone Sag Type"

All I know is that it works darn well. It says that it is heat, oil and gear-oil resistant.


Chrysler is using 3 bond sealer now it works really well parts are very hard to get apart when it cured
 

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Discussion Starter #20
UPDATE: For those that may be interested. My stubborn dam leak has resulted in The following. The further I looked the more I had to pull apart. I was thinking of just re-torqing all the housing/case bolts. But do to the compact nature of these suckers, I was not able to get at a few bolts. So off came the entire rear end. I'm glad I did. In total there were 17 lose bolts on the right side. Including the 6 through the frame and into the case/housing. Like I said in the beginning this tractor was new to me and I figured it was well looked after. The guy had it nice and clean. His shop and property were well looked after. I had my daughter (3yr old) with me and didnt look at the unit hard enough. Oh well. Lesson learned. Got to pick up some case sealant (Thanks for the recomendations) tomorrow and a pin punch set so I can get the park brake arm off of the shaft.


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