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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
This tragic story in the Buffalo News this morning. Read it, Think about it, Now read it again Repeat as many times as necessary.
 

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Senior GTT Super Slacker
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Reading it once was enough.
Thanks for the reminder.
 

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Wow,that is horrible and I can't imagine. As a Firefighter/Paramedic, I feel for those guys/gals and family. Made me recall some incidents I've been involved in. That is one hard incident to have to respond to. Thanks for posting to make everyone think! Be safe everyone.
 

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Very hard reading about this tragic accident.
 

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That article hit me a little more than most I'm sure. Just a week earlier, we heard that a business acquaintance (the buyer from one of our best customers at work) was killed in a tractor accident at his home. He lived in Phelps, NY. I only knew him through work, and we first met about 5 years ago. I didn't even know he was a tractor person.

Details are sketchy, and there was no news article about it, but what we heard was that he was discovered in the woods on his property, pinned under his tractor. Apparently, he was moving a log with his TLB, somehow got knocked out of his seat, tractor kept moving and flipped onto him. No-one else was there, so no one really knows what happened. The only tractor details I got was that it was an older tractor with no ROPS or seat switch.

Truly sad when people get hurt or killed and really makes me think twice (or more) whether what I am doing is safe or not. It doesn't have to be tractor related, it could be on top of a ladder, leaning out a window, running a lawnmower, the list goes on and on.

Please be safe out there, whatever you may be doing.
 

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Great post and reminder. Sombering event....very tragic.:thumbsdown:

I edited the title to get more people to read it. :good2:
 

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Corndog Hater
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Yes just tragic, prayers sent to all involved. The buffalo news (TV) is what we watch, this was about 70 miles from us, vicinity of where Mrs. CP grew up. It's a pretty rural area and the news said this (pulling trees) was something the man did often with his tractor. This time just went horribly wrong.


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Wow, how tragic.....thanks for sharing this.
 

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This is a good reminder. Horrible, pointless deaths, but maybe the posting of this will save a life!

I was just taking my nephews and my own daughters for rides yesterday. I have strict rules about rides. FLAT ground only. NEVER in the woods and NEVER while doing ANY type of actual work! Common sense rules I'd think. So much can go wrong WAY too fast to react. Doesn't matter about ROP in this case, as the grandson would have had a small chance of not being in harms way as a rider who isn't belted into place. Even with ROP, there is no promise that an accident won't kill you. If it looks like a stupid idea or you are rigging together something questionable, just stop before you start! The story sort of makes me mad actually that an adult thought this was a good idea to start with!

Horse power, hydraulics, heavy machinery, and good intentions to share in the FUN can kill! I think it should just be a matter of fact, DO NOT TAKE KIDS ON A TRACTOR in questionable situations! Better yet, only give rides on flat surfaces with the only purpose being a SAFE ride where you can pay 100% attention to the child and that task alone. That's my 2 cents on this....
 

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Wow, prayers to the family and to the ambulance & rescue squad. Very tragic.
 

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Better yet, only give rides on flat surfaces with the only purpose being a SAFE ride where you can pay 100% attention to the child and that task alone.
Excellent, common sense advice.
 

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Incredibly sad

That's an incredibly sad story. Any accidental death is hard but this is doubly hard. Obviously we want to involve our kids but there are times when it's just not a good idea. Typically an over turn when trying to pull an object means the chain was hooked high, perhaps on a three point hitch raised up to gain leverage on the tree. The physics means that the tractor literally crawls out from under the chain. Since the higher connect stops movement the only thing that can happen is the tractor rotates around the rear axle. It can be a very quick process with no time to react.

Regardless of how it happened, my heart goes out to the family and friends. They are surely hurting from this tragic loss.

Treefarmer
 

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Once was enough for me. I lost a cousin to a tractor roll over so it hits home pretty close.


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What exactly caused it to roll? Also, no ROPS on this tractor?
Without more details that aren't in the article, it's impossible to know what caused this rollover, but the story as written is a very common roll over. The way it inevitably happens is that the tractor is hitched to the load with the hitching point above the level of the rear axle. Typically someone either hitches to the top hook on a quickhitch or hitches to something fastened into the 3PH but has the 3PH raised so the attachment point above the axle. 3PH are only designed to be safe for pulling when the resisting force is applied at ground level (rake, etc) or below ground (plow). When you loop a chain to the 3PH, the point of application of force is as high as that hitching point is, NOT the tree/stump/rock/post stuck in the ground. Always hitch a load at or below the height of the axle. Almost all tractors provide an attachment point to facilitate this.

There's two stages to how the roll-over happens. The first stage is a torque generated by applying a resisting force (the load) to the tractor higher than the contact patch of the tires to the ground. If you've ever put a fridge or washing machine on a hand dolly by putting one foot on the axle and then leaning back to pick the appliance up, you've demonstrated how this works. That gets the tractor started doing a wheelie regardless of where you're hitched. Hitched high you'll get a big wheelie, hitched low, you'll get a small wheelie. These are the kind of controlled wheelies you see at a tractor pull (the ones that don't go wrong, at least) The second stage is where things get serious and it makes a BIG difference where you've got the load hitched. Once the front end is up in the air, the rear wheels continue to pull themselves forwards. The hitching point is still stuck to the load and not going anywhere. If the tires are moving forwards and the hitch isn't, the only thing the tractor can do is to use the engine torque to rear up farther into the sky. Where the tractor stops pointing at the sky is determined by how high you have the load hitched. It tractor has pointed up too far before it stops turning itself over, gravity takes over and it rolls over backwards anyway. There was a publication about this (in the context of skidding logs) from some university's extension office that showed that, while it might take a full second or two for the tractor to actually land on its back, the "point of no return" is usually reached in 1/4 to 1/2 of a second. Far too fast for the driver to react. The main reason for this is that our tractors tend to have high centers of gravity located fairly far back which means you don't have to tip up too far before the center of gravity moves behind the rear axle and the flip is inevitable. As another point, this is why driving up hill pulling something can be so dangerous: the hill is already tipping the tractor backwards/up in the air towards the point of no return so it requires a much smaller oops to flip it.

So, why does the height of the hitching matter in the second stage of the backflip? Imagine a circle with the center at the rear axle and the outside edge of the circle passing through the hitching point. The circle basically is like one of the rear tires, if that helps you to figure out which way to visualize it. So, imagine hitching a load below the rear axle. When the tractor rears up, the hitching point is going to move down (because the tractor is tipping down at the butt) but if you trace the circle out, it also has to move forwards to stay on the circle as it drops. The farther below the axle you hitch, the faster the hitching point has to move forwards as it drops towards the ground. However, we're in this pickle because the load won't move. If the load won't move, the hitching point can't move forwards, right? So there's a force developed by the load that actually acts to oppose the desire of the tractor to rear up and point at the sky. The result is that the tractor tends to bounce, spin the tires, etc and no one gets hurt. However, if you hitch above the rear axle, as the tractor rears up, the hitching point again drops towards the ground. This time, unfortunately, trace that circle and you'll see that a point above the axle actually moves backwards as it follows the circle towards the ground. This allows the wheels to keep on moving forwards, pulling the tractor up to a higher and higher angle. Eventually, your center of gravity ends up behind the contact point between the rear tires and the ground and you fall over backwards.


Sorry that turned in to quite a book there. If you want me to explain it in a different way, just ask questions, but the moral is always attach loads below the rear axle and a 3PH raised up does NOT count as below the rear axle!
 

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This truly is a sad event. But, to those that think a child should not be on a tractor except for a ride...Some of us would not have learned about tractors early if not on dad's or granddad's lap when plowing. Now, maybe it takes knowing your child will listen, and remain still and where told where and how to sit. Some kids might try, but have ants in their pants anyway.

My dad was raised on a farm, and was the sole operator of a tractor, as soon as he could reach the pedals. I'm sure some would call that child endangerment today.

If this was an afternoon of fun, removing the tree, then I *might* agree that the child should not have been on there, for the "chore". But if it is part of the family work and income, things can be a bit different. That does not mean this was not a very tragic and sad accident. But, taking a child for a "ride on the tractor" only on smooth land and for a fun ride, does not help teach the child about proper operation, either. In fact, it might send the signal that tractors are all fun and games. People are killed every day in vehicle crashes on the road, because they don't think about how dangerous and deadly operating the equipment can be. They shave, apply makeup, text, surf the web, etc., all while driving. They forgot to respect the machines.

I shed tears when I read about this accident. My hope is that it will save others. But how often are details of highway crashes posted, so people will get to analyze them and learn from them. And the, "Won't happen to me attitude" is usually involved.

Just my random thoughts from a gal that grew up with a tractor that did not have ROPS nor a seatbelt, as it was built before any of those things were even thought about. But one could be hurt by a plow mule that wanted to be a handful, before tractors came along.

I am still glad that this thread was posted, as a reminder to all that read here.
 

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I seem to most of my work with the loader, not the 3pt, so I never really thought about it flipping because of hooking something to the 3pt. Although I know chaining something to my loader bucket hooks can still roll it, though it's easier to control height of load.

Also, my 1026r has a hydrostat transmission, so I feel like "runaway" is a lot harder, actually kind of making it safer?
 

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Very sad indeed. 56 and 7, that's me and my grand boy.


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