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Hi All, I am picking up a 1025R TLB at the end of the month:greentractorride:, and am trying to decide what attachments I need/want to go with it. Its main purpose in life is to get my backyard in order... which involves grading, stump removal & rockery installations. My property is 7-10% slope throughout, local areas are even steeper. much of the landscaping will be taking place on top of a septic field - so i cant go nuts digging too deeply. drain rock starts ~12-18" down depending on the location, mostly in the gravel removal area. soils are mostly clay'ey glacial till, sometimes patches of sand. lots of rocks.

I am currently set to buy the frontier 48" BB & JD Thumb for TLB. I'm contemplating the artillian forks & frontier landscape rake. TNT looks tempting from the little bit i have read on it... not sure what the whole mod costs, it looked like fit-rite doesnt sell the valve assembly.

so two questions,
What method would you go about configuring the hill of weeds & rabbit holes to become grass?
What attachments / mods are recommended (Additional budget $3k or so)?:gizmo:


Tasks (in priority order):
remove stumps & unwanted trees (cedar/Indian plum in the images)
scoop up & remove 10yd of mixed gravel (torn up garden pic)
bring in 40yd top soil, grade smooth enough for a lawn
build rockery next to new lawn area (2man, 3'x30')
seed lawn (~7000 sf)
build additional rockery (3'x70')
mow(?):greentractorride:


located in the northwest
 

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I am currently set to buy the frontier 48" BB & JD Thumb for TLB. I'm contemplating the artillian forks & frontier landscape rake.
I would get a 54" BB from Everything Attachments, maybe the landscape rake too depending upon how the price compares to a frontier. If you don't mind a mere 25lbs extra weight you can get the Titan forks for half the price of the Artillians. I would also add in a JD iMatch, Ken's bolt on hooks and a Piranha tooth bar .

Then for our short days coming up you might want to add some LED flood lights, maybe swap out all the existing bulbs for LEDs as well.
 

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so two questions,
What method would you go about configuring the hill of weeds & rabbit holes to become grass?
What attachments / mods are recommended (Additional budget $3k or so)?:gizmo:


Tasks (in priority order):
remove stumps & unwanted trees (cedar/Indian plum in the images)
Your backhoe and loader will be your primary tools here. Hooks on both would be handy. Some chains too. A toothbar will make digging with the bucket much, much easier. A subsoiler might come in handy here if you want to try to pull up roots.

scoop up & remove 10yd of mixed gravel (torn up garden pic)
Your loader will be doing 99% of that. But 10 yards is quite a bit of gravel. You're loader bucket is just under 1/3rd of a yard so 10 yards is going to be 32-33 full bucket loads. If you have a trailer to load that into you can do a lot less running around. Plus, you'll need to haul that somewhere anyway.

bring in 40yd top soil, grade smooth enough for a lawn
again, this is mostly loader work to get it in there. Then maybe a back blade or box blade (minus the scarifiers) to semi-level followed by a landscape rake.

build rockery next to new lawn area (2man, 3'x30')
This is all loader/backhoe work along with a lot of muscle and a big prybar.

seed lawn (~7000 sf)
Some sort of fertilizer/seed spreader and a roller.

build additional rockery (3'x70')
Same as above

mow(?):greentractorride:
At 7,000 sq ft of lawn? A nice walk-behind push mower...

Some of these things may be a one-time use for you (Like a trailer and roller). You'll have to look at each and think about whether you'd use them again. If not, consider renting them if you can. But the items you'll use again, rent the items you only need once.
 

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Agree on the iMatch. Make sure all equipment bought are iMatch compatible. 8 or more suit case weights would be nice and probably needed. Visit Heavy Hitch, they have some things you might need.
 

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Definitely pallet forks like you planned, regardless of brand.
Maybe a toothed bar for the bucket.
You'll be glad for the bucket hooks you'll be installing, and of course all the rigging you will need to lift and move stuff.
Sounds like a lot of FEL work at first, so remember to grease it every 10 hours.
Looking at your pictures, I can guess that once your grading and spreading work is done, you probably won't use a box blade again. I bought one, used it my first month, and it has sat unused for the two years since then. Can you borrow one, and save the money for something else?
Looks like you have neighbors very close so maybe you won't be tractoring at night, and maybe extra lights won't be needed.
Do you get much snow where you live?
At 7000 sq ft a 3 point spreader would be a waste, IMO, that's small enough to do by hand.
Will you be using the tractor to mow your new yard?
 

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Don't overlook ballast weight. I went with the Heavy Hitch dual row receiver/weight drawbar and 16*42# suitcase weights. It is a bit pricey, but more weight than a ballast box and it tucks in tightly to the back of the tractor. So less chance of backing or swinging it into something when performing loader work. Plus, you can utilize the same suitcase weight up front when moving earth with 3-point attachments.

Depending on the extent of how much grade changes you'll be making and how much existing top soil you'll be retaining, a tiller may be in order. I find mine virtually indispensable on any landscaping project. I find it pretty slow going and a lot wear impact to the FEL attempting to move/grade/dig compacted soil. However, a pass or two through it before hand with the tiller makes it putty in the hands of the FEL. Moreover, the tiller by itself will smooth and level out a lot of an uneven grade.

Looking at your photos, I'm speculating your base grade is pretty close. Leveling and roughing in the base grade is where I utilize a landscape rake the most. As you don't appear to have much of that to do, I wouldn't recommend one at this point. If you're going to acquire a 3 -point landscape rake, you'll need the gauge wheels along with it. It gets pricey when looking at a quality rake.

I've never utilized a box blade to any extent on a landscape project. If it is a very large area, I could see where it would be handy.
 

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I agree with everyone's suggestions on here, but as martincom said, I would invest in a tiller also. They are a valuable landscaping tool, you can till deep and give the wife nice fluffy soil for planting and you can also just cuff the sod for reseeding purposes. And definitely forks and a tooth bar for the bucket. :good2:
 
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I agree with everyone's suggestions on here, but as martincom said, I would invest in a tiller also. They are a valuable landscaping tool, you can till deep and give the wife nice fluffy soil for planting and you can also just cuff the sod for reseeding purposes. And definitely forks and a tooth bar for the bucket. :good2:
What does CUFF THE SOD mean. Do you just lower the tiller enough to scrape a little of the lawn?
 
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What does CUFF THE SOD mean. Do you just lower the tiller enough to scrape a little of the lawn?
Yup, just enough to turn it a little, breaking it up to reseed.
 
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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks for the suggestions gents. Appreciate the welcome to GTT as well. :)

So in conclusion:
Umbrella Kit :rain:
LED Kit
Bucket Hooks
54" BB from Everything Attachments
Piranha Bar
Titan Forks
KK 5' Tiller
iMatch
Heavy Hitch double bar + 16 Weights

My dad used to operate heavy equipment (From cat 980s down to JD 310), and he thought a TNT was a mandatory item for use with gannon boxes. Can you comment for these small tractors? I do have odd & compound grades, so it seems like it would be very useful... but the mrs will be :rocket: if i'm chasing tools i dont need. :hide:

A subsoiler was mentioned in one of the replies, would that be better, or a ripper blade/knife for the BH? I will definitely have roots to go through before the tiller comes into the picture, some may be arm or leg thick anywhere near the downed fir trees.

---

I may mow eventually, the final lawn isnt going to be large, and as mentioned, i probably could push mow it. There is a utility line behind my property that is only brush hogged once every two or three years. when it is brush hogged there is a path to a power cut nearby that has heaps of blackberries along its edges which are easy to harvest.. the power company maintains the cut year round. So i might oneday find myself a brush hog to at least keep the path from getting overgrown with blackberries thickets to get to the 'good' ones in the summer.

Neighbors are fairly close, but with our short winter days, working at night will be 430pm... so LEDs are a must.
 

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It doesn't seem like the implements you purchase (box blade, tiller, etc etc) will have much use after your project is completed. I would pass on spending a few grand for implements and purchase; #1 a good tooth bar for the loader bucket (that will give you many of the benefits the rippers on a box blade does) #2 a used soil pulverizer (this one implement will move soil, level soil, and make a seed bed for seeding. Also works decent as a landscape rake). With the front bucket/tooth bar, backhoe, and a pulverizer it seems to me you can tackle your lawn area while saving $$$$ on items that will sit around once the project is completed or be sold at a loss to your wallet. Purchasing a used soil pulverizer will likely result in you being able to sell it after the project is completed and retrieve your money back while the tooth bar will never be money wasted and worth keeping around for as long as you own the tractor.
 

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A subsoiler was mentioned in one of the replies, would that be better, or a ripper blade/knife for the BH? I will definitely have roots to go through before the tiller comes into the picture, some may be arm or leg thick anywhere near the downed fir trees.
I don't have a backhoe, and have found a subsoiler useful to start ripping roots out of the ground. My pallet fork frame has a receiver hitch on it, so sometimes I'll put the subsoiler on it with the edge facing the tractor, and use the subsoiler that way with the FEL to hook, lift, and pull the root. I take the forks off the frame for that, Most of the time I use the subsoiler on the 3pt hitch, though.

Once I get a root exposed enough to wrap a chain around it, most of them I can pull out of the ground in 4WD low with the chain hooked to my rear receiver hitch.
 
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Welcome to the site sdiguana!

From what you said and by looking at the pics you can save most of your money. Other than the stumps being a pain to dig out and will take some time, I see no reason why you can't use the FEL and BH for almost all the grading. I can see you maybe getting a rake to pick up all the rocks. I'd look at renting one unless you are maintaining a gravel drive? You already mentioned that you are needing to grade a little on top of the turkey mound and from the pic it just needs a little work. The rake will work for that as well because you can't go deep and unless you installed it how can you guarantee that the pipes are still at the correct depth? I wouldn't run a tiller on top of it. Looking at the pics for a second time I don't see a problem with scraping the weeds with just the bucket.

You will be surprised on how thick of a tree root the BH bucket will dig thru if you have some patience and work at it. I have dug out plenty that are as big or bigger than what I can see in your pics. You want most of the root out so the further away from the main part of the stump the easier it is to break the roots to get it out.

I also wouldn't spend the money on weights and or filling the tires because of what you already said that you are only using the tractor for just a one time big project and then just maintain a path to some berries.. So why spend the money on stuff you really don't need for a long period of time?

Seriously, looking at what you got and what your going to do with your new toy I probably wouldn't spend the money on a tooth bar and I would rent a rake. I would use a push spreader or a hand held one to spread the grass seed.

Well that's my 2 cents worth. Like I've said before to other New members it's your money not ours! There are lots of threads on here that show different toothbars and landscape projects and lots of advice.

Good luck and we all love pics!
 
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Discussion Starter #17
I am curious for more comments on the pulverizer vs tiller... some parts of my yard are soft enough that i sink in an inch or two just walking, this is a small part of the yard, but it does have me wondering how i will navigate the tractor through it. Other parts are hard packed clay that put a Bobcat T590 through its paces. About half the yard is clay, the other half is sand/organic fluff, split down the property long-ways.

My understanding was If i add any more than a modest amount of top soil or compost to amend my soils, i need to till it in to prevent layering the soils, particularly over the clay areas. Can I achieve a similar or better end product with the pulverizer? I like the idea of the soil being packed back in a bit by the pulverizer, particularly since i have a grade.

A tiller and a pulverizer are basically the same price, so I could go either way.


in regards to not buying low-use attachments - i totally get what you're saying, but my local markets are kookoo for labor and tool prices. most people are selling old rusty implements at 90-100% of new value on craigslist.:banghead: I'll just have to swallow the hit on selling it after i'm done - compared to hiring out, i will be light years ahead of the depreciation hit.
 

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Buy what you need

I am curious for more comments on the pulverizer vs tiller... some parts of my yard are soft enough that i sink in an inch or two just walking, this is a small part of the yard, but it does have me wondering how i will navigate the tractor through it. Other parts are hard packed clay that put a Bobcat T590 through its paces. About half the yard is clay, the other half is sand/organic fluff, split down the property long-ways.

My understanding was If i add any more than a modest amount of top soil or compost to amend my soils, i need to till it in to prevent layering the soils, particularly over the clay areas. Can I achieve a similar or better end product with the pulverizer? I like the idea of the soil being packed back in a bit by the pulverizer, particularly since i have a grade.

A tiller and a pulverizer are basically the same price, so I could go either way.


in regards to not buying low-use attachments - i totally get what you're saying, but my local markets are kookoo for labor and tool prices. most people are selling old rusty implements at 90-100% of new value on craigslist.:banghead: I'll just have to swallow the hit on selling it after i'm done - compared to hiring out, i will be light years ahead of the depreciation hit.
I had the same concerns regarding buying vs renting vs trying to "get by" with fewer tools and implements. Rentals aren't available around here, nor are others who can trade/loan/swap implements.

The first thing I added was hooks. Not expensive, handy when needed, but seldom needed. Tiller? Used far more than I imagined and effective while efficient. Box blade with scarifiers? Huge learning curve, but a great tool after you find how to use it. FEL with good toothbar? Absolutely worth every penny. Great for back grading, digging, and more. Backhoe? Get good at it and you'll really enjoy it. No more shoveling holes for tree planting or tree pulling. Forks? Yes, absolutely invaluable almost every single day. Belly mower? Hold off on that and get a good DR Mower for a better cut with less hassle. My DR is 26 yrs old and does a better job with less extra trimming than any MMM could ever do on 1.5-2 acres. I'm seriously considering selling the 54D mower. It's easier to ride than walk, but it scalps, gets out of adjustment, it's in the way when using the real tractor implements, and it's noisy as hell.

Do get some good earplugs and wear them. These tractors are noisy!
 
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