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Hey Guys. Bought a new 3038E last summer and have noticed several mentions to let tractor idle before shutting down. Will this really pro long life of tractor? Also bought a new RC 6000 rotary cutter at the same time and was surprised when lubricating grease zerks for the first time. Went to grease zerk at end of shaft near gear box on universal joint and didn't find one. Only plastic one on shaft cover. Dealer said there is not one on rear universal and owners manual only shows the one on plastic shield. I have always had one on previous bush hogs on rear universal joint. Anybody else ran into this?
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Hey Guys. Bought a new 3038E last summer and have noticed several mentions to let tractor idle before shutting down. Will this really pro long life of tractor?
Yeah the issue here is the turbo. It will get quite hot since it’s powered by exhaust. So after running it hard you want to let it idle for a couple minutes. Otherwise it will eventually fail earlier then normal. I typically just idle the engine the last 200’ drive or so to park it. If it’s a hot day and I’ve been running it hard like when mowing in the summer. I’ll idle it longer since it’s running hotter. I usually take that opportunity to get my blower and blow out the radiator. So more like 5 minute cool down.


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2017 2038r 72” MMM Command Cut 220r loader
 
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What happens is this:

The turbo relies on engine oil circulation for its lubrication, which only happens when the engine is running. When you shut it down on a hot turbo, the remaining oil is trapped, and quickly cooks and forms carbon deposits because the hot turbo is still spinning. Over time, these deposits will destroy it. The reason to idle it is to cool it down so the trapped oil doesn't burn.

People say that tractor turbos are super reliable, you never have to worry about them, etc. I think that's only true because of the relatively low usage as compared to something like tractor trailers (which typically go 10-15,000 hours before rebuilds, if not longer). So I'm not even sure that doing this is a big deal with tractors. They simply don't get used enough. I would still do it religiously if I had a turbo because I just can't stand the idea of damaging my equipment (and this is one of the reasons that I don't). Not being able to shut down the engine in the middle of working without feeling like I'm doing something bad would get old fast.
 

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Not a turbo person. Puts extra strain on components to produce hp rather than more cubic inches. Great for tractor - trailers and long hour operation. Just something else to worry about and replace. Great for the gadget person and bragging rights. My tractors are not race cars and do not need the " boost ! ".
 
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