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I'm going to build some cabinets for the garage. They aren't going to be fancy, but it's a pretty big project for me. I'm an amateur sketchup designer, so bear with me if this is really horrible. :laugh:

The first one is five feet and the second one is 8 feet. There's a notch in the top of the long one to go around a window. The design is for 3/4" plywood for the shelves, top and sides with 1x4 for the rest. I'll be using 1/4" plywood for the door middles. Does this design look ok? I'm certainly not a cabinet guy, so if there are pointers. I'm all ears.

Garage Kitchen Gadget Cabinet - New 1.jpg

Garage Kitchen Gadget Cabinet - New 2.jpg
 

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Looks pretty good. If it's just going into the garage I'd forget about the doors. Doors can get in the way sometimes.
 

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I would think about making the shelve adjustable with either pins in the side or shelf standards in the sides. I made some just like that 17 years ago without adjustable shelves and I've been kicking myself ever since.
Ron
 

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I think they look pretty good. Those will be some sturdy cabinets if you build them out of 3/4":thumbup1gif:
 

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Nice drawings and should be a good strong cabinet will last a life time. I had sliding doors on one cabinet (workbench) after working at the workbench for a month doors were removed. Since then I've made several buildings for the grandsons ,from the doors. :dunno:
 

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I think they look pretty good. Those will be some sturdy cabinets if you build them out of 3/4":thumbup1gif:
yeah but with 3/4 plywood their darn sure not gonna bend:thumbup1gif: stick to the 3/4 plywood theory for the shelves. u can go with 1/2 for the sides-maybe!:dunno:
Bubber..............................................................................................
my vote is to leave the door's maybe off a few and see how u like it.

i too would like adjustable shelves in mine. when i made my large cupboard's down stairs, i went around measuring can's and jug's. lot of aggravation:banghead:
 

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I vote for adjustable shelves and no doors. When my son built his he used shelve standards on the sides of each cabinet and he loves his adjustable shelves. Good Luck. :good2:
 

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Think about how you'll be attaching them to the wall. I like using 1/2 inch plywood for the back, glued and clamped into a rabbet in the sides, top and bottom. The half inch is strong enough that you can screw anywhere through the back into wall studs and it will hold. Alternatively you can attach 1x4 brackets to the wall and to the "backless" cabinets and hang them that way. It's not as rigid as a solid back provides.
 

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If the concrete slab in your building floats, be sure to mount the cabinets to the wall using vertical slots, not holes. As the slab moves up and down, you'll want the cabinets to move with it without causing damage to anything.

I assume you will be using the top of these cabinets for a work surface. Is the height of your cabinets compatible with your height? I'm taller, so I build anything with a work surface higher than standard. This way I don't get a sore back bending over the work surface for long periods of time.
 

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Doors are a PITA to have and make but they sure keep the inside a lot cleaner.
3/4" Tongue and groove flooring can make for some nice door frames, just rip the tongue off.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all of the comments everyone. The height is 44" and is the same height as a workbench that is there now, but I'm moving that to the barn. It's a fine height for me to work on, but a little tall for Mrs. Bubber. I thought about making it shorter, but the over all height is dictated by the shelves. I have the Kreg shelf jig already, but I think I'm going to solid mount the shelves. The top shelf is spaced for quart mason jars. the second is for kitchen gadgets like crock pots (we have 7 of those). The bottom shelf is for large pots and 5 gallon food buckets. I think I want the doors, since kitchen stuff will be in there. Yup, we've got a lot of kitchen stuff. :laugh:
 

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Go with the doors!!!!

You can make raised panel doors and they are easy to do IF you have two things:
*A router table
*A panel raising kit
(*Table saw is helpful but you can use a circular saw by hand if you can cut straight lines)

If you have a router and don't have a table, you can make one very easily. Simply remove your router baseplate and install a 1/2 X16x16" piece of MDF and screw it between 2 saw horses. The panel raising kit all have bearings on them so all you have to do is set the height of the bit and go nuts cutting the pieces. Honestly the first door might take you an hour to do but the rest will only take minutes. The outcome is spectacular, people will think you spent thousands on custom cabinets.

I built a set not unlike what you have drawn for my oldest kid's bathroom. We needed storage for his supplies so I made a 4 door raised panel out of MFD. Painted the frame and doors gloss white. You'd never know I only had $50 in the cabinet. They aren't Ethan Allen cabinets, but they aren't thousands of dollars either. If I wanted to I could make them out of cherry, oak, poplar...wouldn't matter since I have the tools.

If you are going to paint them you can use MDF for the frames and door panels and they will be fine. Do the carcass and shelves out of plywood. If you want to use good plywood use 9 ply Baltic birch. Very stable and not overly expensive. You can't get it at the box stores though, you need a lumber yard. It comes mostly in 5' x 5' sheets although you can find it in 4'x8' sheets sometimes.

The baltic birch is great stuff to work with and what most cabinet makers use for custom cabinets. 5x5 sheet here cost $39 dollars. I made all my kitchen cabinet carcasses with it and any jigs or templates in the wood shop I have. It is very stable and as a shelf it won't bow and sag. The outer veneer wood also doesn't splinter when cut so it makes for clean edges.

If you are interested in setting up making your own doors send me a PM, I can help guide you on the cheaper path. I always like to do things on my own and buying a router table and panel raising kit were the best investments I have ever made. Over the 17 years that I have had them I have made custom cabinets and doors/drawers for lots of projects I have done. Well worth the few dollars up front.

YMMV
 

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Thanks for all of the comments everyone. The height is 44" and is the same height as a workbench that is there now, but I'm moving that to the barn. It's a fine height for me to work on, but a little tall for Mrs. Bubber. I thought about making it shorter, but the over all height is dictated by the shelves. I have the Kreg shelf jig already, but I think I'm going to solid mount the shelves. The top shelf is spaced for quart mason jars. the second is for kitchen gadgets like crock pots (we have 7 of those). The bottom shelf is for large pots and 5 gallon food buckets. I think I want the doors, since kitchen stuff will be in there. Yup, we've got a lot of kitchen stuff. :laugh:
With that in mind I think doors would be a good thing. I was thinking tools and other misc. garage stuff. :laugh:
 

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Go with the doors!!!!

You can make raised panel doors and they are easy to do IF you have two things:
*A router table
*A panel raising kit
(*Table saw is helpful but you can use a circular saw by hand if you can cut straight lines)

If you have a router and don't have a table, you can make one very easily. Simply remove your router baseplate and install a 1/2 X16x16" piece of MDF and screw it between 2 saw horses. The panel raising kit all have bearings on them so all you have to do is set the height of the bit and go nuts cutting the pieces. Honestly the first door might take you an hour to do but the rest will only take minutes. The outcome is spectacular, people will think you spent thousands on custom cabinets.

I built a set not unlike what you have drawn for my oldest kid's bathroom. We needed storage for his supplies so I made a 4 door raised panel out of MFD. Painted the frame and doors gloss white. You'd never know I only had $50 in the cabinet. They aren't Ethan Allen cabinets, but they aren't thousands of dollars either. If I wanted to I could make them out of cherry, oak, poplar...wouldn't matter since I have the tools.

If you are going to paint them you can use MDF for the frames and door panels and they will be fine. Do the carcass and shelves out of plywood. If you want to use good plywood use 9 ply Baltic birch. Very stable and not overly expensive. You can't get it at the box stores though, you need a lumber yard. It comes mostly in 5' x 5' sheets although you can find it in 4'x8' sheets sometimes.

The baltic birch is great stuff to work with and what most cabinet makers use for custom cabinets. 5x5 sheet here cost $39 dollars. I made all my kitchen cabinet carcasses with it and any jigs or templates in the wood shop I have. It is very stable and as a shelf it won't bow and sag. The outer veneer wood also doesn't splinter when cut so it makes for clean edges.

If you are interested in setting up making your own doors send me a PM, I can help guide you on the cheaper path. I always like to do things on my own and buying a router table and panel raising kit were the best investments I have ever made. Over the 17 years that I have had them I have made custom cabinets and doors/drawers for lots of projects I have done. Well worth the few dollars up front.

YMMV
I'm no expert on baltic birch but everything I've read about it was the same as you stated.
 

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If you go with doors, here's an idea that you might like (or you might think it's pretty dumb! :laugh: )....

Take some pieces of 1x4 for the frame. Run them through a router table or a table saw to cut a 1/8" slot in the edge. Cut the 1x4 with 45's at the ends to the desired length for the door frame size. I'd use a pocket hole jig to join the corners, but I'm sure the guys on here that are actually good woodworkers could give a better solution.

Buy some of this at your favorite big box store. Lowe's actually used to carry this in 4x8 for about $12/sheet. Cut it into panels the right size to fit in the door slots and put it all together. It's already a nice white, so you won't need to paint it. And, with the "white board" finish on it, you can label the contents of each of your cabinets right on the door! :good2:

Back when I needed to put whiteboards in my employees' offices I used to use this stuff. Have you ever priced a "real whiteboard" in the bigger sizes? A 4x8 white board, with shipping, is well over $200! I could put up the stuff from Lowe's, slap some trim around it and call it a day for about $30. :good2:
 

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If you go with doors, here's an idea that you might like (or you might think it's pretty dumb! :laugh: )....

Take some pieces of 1x4 for the frame. Run them through a router table or a table saw to cut a 1/8" slot in the edge. Cut the 1x4 with 45's at the ends to the desired length for the door frame size. I'd use a pocket hole jig to join the corners, but I'm sure the guys on here that are actually good woodworkers could give a better solution.

Buy some of this at your favorite big box store. Lowe's actually used to carry this in 4x8 for about $12/sheet. Cut it into panels the right size to fit in the door slots and put it all together. It's already a nice white, so you won't need to paint it. And, with the "white board" finish on it, you can label the contents of each of your cabinets right on the door! :good2:

Back when I needed to put whiteboards in my employees' offices I used to use this stuff. Have you ever priced a "real whiteboard" in the bigger sizes? A 4x8 white board, with shipping, is well over $200! I could put up the stuff from Lowe's, slap some trim around it and call it a day for about $30. :good2:
Avoid the mitered corners if you can. Gluing them up will be a PITA if you aren't setup for them. I just made 6 cherry drawer fronts for some furniture I am making the wife. I went with five piece mitered drawer fronts. They look good but to make them right took me a few tries and getting them held to glue took me building some custom jigs. You can make a 5 panel door with a table saw fairly easily. Make the corners butt joints and you'll be happier.

I do like the idea of making the center panel out of whiteboard material, notes, math and contents are all good things to have a place for!
 

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Take some pieces of 1x4 for the frame. Run them through a router table or a table saw to cut a 1/8" slot in the edge. Cut the 1x4 with 45's at the ends to the desired length for the door frame size. I'd use a pocket hole jig to join the corners, but I'm sure the guys on here that are actually good woodworkers could give a better solution.
Avoid the mitered corners if you can. Gluing them up will be a PITA if you aren't setup for them. I just made 6 cherry drawer fronts for some furniture I am making the wife. I went with five piece mitered drawer fronts. They look good but to make them right took me a few tries and getting them held to glue took me building some custom jigs. You can make a 5 panel door with a table saw fairly easily. Make the corners butt joints and you'll be happier.

I do like the idea of making the center panel out of whiteboard material, notes, math and contents are all good things to have a place for!

What did I tell ya! :laugh::flag_of_truce:

I'm no woodworker - I just slap something together and hope it holds. If it's square within 15* or so, I usually call it a day. :lolol: I thought I was high-falutin' when I bought a small Kreg Pocket Hole Jig.
 

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Don't know if you will be doing any wood work in the shop, but I built cabinets in my old house that were the same height as my table saw which was nice for cutting sheet products. I also topped off my plywood top on the cabinet with some 1/8" hard board that comes in sheets. The hard board allowed the sheet products to slide good when I was cutting them on the table saw and it also is a much better wear surface then plywood when you are using it as a work bench. Also leave the doors on if you are wood working it will keep the saw dust off anything stored inside. Otherwise leave them off for easier access.
 

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Thanks for all of the comments everyone. The height is 44" and is the same height as a workbench that is there now, but I'm moving that to the barn. It's a fine height for me to work on, but a little tall for Mrs. Bubber. I thought about making it shorter, but the over all height is dictated by the shelves. I have the Kreg shelf jig already, but I think I'm going to solid mount the shelves. The top shelf is spaced for quart mason jars. the second is for kitchen gadgets like crock pots (we have 7 of those). The bottom shelf is for large pots and 5 gallon food buckets. I think I want the doors, since kitchen stuff will be in there. Yup, we've got a lot of kitchen stuff. :laugh:
Well that changes everything. When I saw your drawings they looked like wall cabinets (uppers). But it sounds like they are lower cabinets with a work surface on the top. So, depending on what is going to happen on the work surface you have to worry about racking forces. A beefy face frame will help with a top rail that may be 1x6 instead of 1x4. Most lower cabinets have a 3-4 inch toe-kick space so you can stand comfortably while working at the work surface. It that will only be a rare amount of time you could skip the toe-kick. I'd still gone with the half inch plywood back to provide rigidity.
 
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