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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A friend of mine sent me this info, from where I don't know, since I've been hauling some equipment around lately. Anyone else heard of this?

Here's his message:

Hey Wayne, there is a new federal law going to take effect in September that all axles on trailer with a GVW of 2600lbs or more must have brakes. This is for commercial and non-commercial trailers. Any strap must display a tag that states the strength of the strap. This is a crackdown on lawn care and landscapers using trailers improperly loaded and improperly licensed. Noncommercial trailers are included in the new laws. Also don’t get caught using your noncommercial trailer for commercial use.

The use of house trailer axles and tires are not allowed now. The fine per house trailer tire is $200.00 per tire. If I were buying a new trailer I would get the brakes on both axles. If you have an older trailer with brakes on one axle you will be required to install brakes on the other axle. These laws will be enforced by states requiring inspections and states that don’t do inspections will have troopers and DOT spot inspections.
 

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Interesting...I have not heard anything about it. The 2600lb thing is strange-in most states anything under 3000lbs does not require brakes, that's why you see a lot of trailers spec'ed out at 2990lbs.
 

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I always thought or rule of thumb, two axles one had to have brakes. One axle no brakes needed.
 

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I wonder if this somehow was slipped into a bill somewhere as part of a deal allowing Mexican trucks deeper in the USA. I know that seems like a non-sequitur; but with Washington...nothing surprises me.
 

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I always thought or rule of thumb, two axles one had to have brakes. One axle no brakes needed.
Just had my trailer inspected here in PA, they said 4 wheels 4 brakes, it's the law... My trailer is fine although I am waiting on the brake controller to get here and mount in my truck...
 

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Just had my trailer inspected here in PA, they said 4 wheels 4 brakes, it's the law... My trailer is fine although I am waiting on the brake controller to get here and mount in my truck...
Does PA require (semi)Annual inspection on trailers like to they for on-road vehicles?
 

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Here in MD they would not be able to apply a new rule like that unless the title is being transferred. That is the only tume they do an inspection a trailer. They have gotten so out of hand with registration fees, that a lot of guys are registering trailers out of state. Although they will often get you in MD for a car that is registered out of state, they don't seem to pursue trailers. Everyone I know who has done this registers them in Maine. So in the end, if you see a trailer in MD that has ME registration it is really obvious they are dodging a registration fee. Yet, I have never heard of anyone being fined.

I have a single axle trailer that does not have brakes. I want to check it now, I thought it was rated for 3500#. It is about 15 years old now.

I do see some scary set-ups on these landscaping rigs. Although I have never witnessed an accident, I have seen many looking for a place to happen!

Lee
 

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The trailer plates here in Michigan are permanent plates now. Meaning you buy the plate once for as long as you own the trailer, how ever the plate is non transferable, if you buy a new trailer you have to buy a new plate. The plate price is based on weight and can be a big cost up front.
 

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Very interesting. My memory was correct, the GAWR is 3500#. But to follow Kenny's rule, they limited the GVWR to 2990#.

I am trying to post a picture, let's see if I am smart enough on tapatalk.

Lee



Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
Yuppers...over 3k needs brakes in most states.

I registered my 10k 16' trailer in Maine last year through Terry's Tag and Title Service, save a boatload and its good for 5 years to boot.
 

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Here in TN, personal trailers don't have to be tagged. You can purchase a tag if you would like, but it's not required. They offer them for guys that may travel to states that do require trailer tags, just to cut down on the hassle of being stopped for not having one.
 

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Here in TN, personal trailers don't have to be tagged. You can purchase a tag if you would like, but it's not required. They offer them for guys that may travel to states that do require trailer tags, just to cut down on the hassle of being stopped for not having one.
Been there, done that. MD State Troopers didn't believe me about the lack of registration needed in TN. :bye2:
 

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Current Federal Law:

Brakes required on all wheels. - Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

Personally, I don't understand why anyone would buy a trailer with brakes and NOT want brakes on all of the wheels. The cost difference to add them to additional axles is small, and the amount of reduced brake wear on your tow vehicle is more than enough to justify that expense.

Also - "new laws" are almost NEVER retroactive. If you bought a strap that doesn't display its load carrying information, they can't make you go buy a new one that does show it. HOWEVER - they CAN hassle you about not being able to prove that it will carry the load you are attaching with it. But, they can do that now.

2600 lbs is an odd number indeed. Maybe they meant 2600kgs? That would equate to roughly 6,000 lbs (5700 is more accurate, but still) and might make more sense.
 

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I just want to note that these regulations are for commercial vehicles, per 393.42 (A). While it's good to know, it doesn't apply to non-commercial use. Joe Tractorowner doesn't have to worry about it unless he starts making money hauling around his machine, which opens a whole other can of technical worms.
Not "exactly".

The rules apply to any vehicle that meets the definition of a commercial vehicle. That definition is available on this page, Definitions. - Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, and includes this:

Commercial motor vehicle means any self-propelled or towed motor vehicle used on a highway in interstate commerce to transport passengers or property when the vehicle

393.1 (Scope of the rules in this part. - Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration) lays this out, and 390.5 (Definitions. - Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration) has the definitions.
 

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Commercial motor vehicle means any self-propelled or towed motor vehicle used on a highway in interstate commerce to transport passengers or property when the vehicle
I think we're on the same page. Most of us here are not engaged in any type of commerce, be it interstate or intrastate when we move our machines.
 

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I think we're on the same page. Most of us here are not engaged in any type of commerce, be it interstate or intrastate when we move our machines.
The comments from the OP seemed to be at least partially targeted toward commercial hauling, so this would be appropriate in that regard. Also, regulations on commercial haulers are typically more "well-defined" and enforced - if we all follow the guidelines set forth there, we'll be in good shape all around.

The laws are for the commercial companies, but they make good sense for all.

I have ALL Grade 70 ratcheting binders and chains for my 2520 and I connect at two points. I'm way over what I need to have, and for only a couple hundred dollars investment. Can easily add more as the years go on if I need to.
 
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