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Discussion Starter #241
Beautiful garage and addition project sennister! You may be inspiring me/getting me into trouble. ;)
Thanks.

One thing I have found out along the way. Keep in mind this is my first project of this scale. Plan to go over budget. I haven't sat down to go over the real numbers but I would say we are at 25-30% over what we were expecting to spend. I really don't want to add up the numbers. Granted some of the changes were due to changes. For instance we opted to have them complete the insulation, as well as mudding, taping and piming the walls. Originally we were going to do that on our own. So technically is that part of overbudget?

We are probably a month or so away from getting cement to pour the apron and close out the contract with the general contractor.
 

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Plan to go over budget. I haven't sat down to go over the real numbers but I would say we are at 25-30% over what we were expecting to spend.
I'm not going throw any rocks. The budget for my first, ground up, new home was $89K. Throughout the project little changes and enhancements would come up and I would say, "Its only a few dollars more.." Eight years later I sold it and had to compute the gain, for taxes. I had to go back and add up what I actually spent building it. Just a few hundred shy of $140K.

So yup, I figure at least 25% over my pre-construction estimate. "Its only a few dollars more" has become the standard joke any time I've built anything since.
 

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Discussion Starter #244
I'm not going throw any rocks. The budget for my first, ground up, new home was $89K. Throughout the project little changes and enhancements would come up and I would say, "Its only a few dollars more.." Eight years later I sold it and had to compute the gain, for taxes. I had to go back and add up what I actually spent building it. Just a few hundred shy of $140K.

So yup, I figure at least 25% over my pre-construction estimate. "Its only a few dollars more" has become the standard joke any time I've built anything since.
You are right. That oh it is a little bit more for this change or that upgrade which is a small % of the build cost all adds up when you are doing it over and over on a bigger scale project. In some cases it makes sense though rather than going back upgrading later or redoing something which is going to be way more expensive or sometimes not really feasible.

We also had some issues where estimation on the contractor's side wasn't right. For instance, we were short something like 6 trusses from the initial estimate. I kind of get how this happened. When we did the original plan/quote we were going to hand frame the existing trusses on the porch which transformed into the mudroom/laundry. Well I got talking with the contractor and said lets just rip the roof and old trusses off the old porch and start over. Otherwise you have to have a beam installed to support the original trusses. Well the ball got dropped, the 6 additional trusses were not accounted for or special ordered. Then the crane had to come out twice. Should I have eaten the cost on that? I am not sure, we did though. We did way more electrical than he expected when he quoted it. We bought almost all the materials though and I did a lot of the work so it shouldn't have mattered that much but there was some additional costs there that we split.

In the end, I haven't added up stuff like I said and don't really plan on it. My ballpark estimate is that it was really close to the cost of the house you built after overages. I would have to go back and look at the contract but I think $89K or so happened to be really close to the estimate without the shingles and siding as we were doing that as a separate contract with the company that was replacing the roof and siding from storm damage. Also there was some work we were planning on doing ourselves like the insulation and sheetrock on the walls like I mentioned earlier that we added. I don't really count that toward over budget as it was more of a change.

I know my wife going into this was thinking oh we should be able to do this for $40-60K. Back then I was just smiling and nodding. Sure..... One good thing I guess is that the county also thought we could do it for that much. Our assessed value went up $61K plus $14K for the roof.
 

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Discussion Starter #245
Great pics and plans, I wish I had another garage and home for my JD!
Thanks. I only posted a small fraction of the photos as I wanted to document a lot of where things are as that comes in handy when trying to remember where something got buried or where those wires are run under the sheetrock.

Just the other day I was digging through all the photos looking for where the floor drain outlet is as it got covered up with back fill.
 

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Discussion Starter #246
Just to throw some numbers on what I mean about in-floor heat being really slow to respond to temp changes in the case you installed it in an area you don't want to heat to a comfortable temp all the time.

It was pretty warm this Saturday (50s) and Sunday we hit 60F out, I had all the doors open pretty much all day. Since the thermostat is set to 65F I went over and turned off the thermostat at some point on Sat. I was running out to meet some people for coffee yesterday morning and when I walked out to the garage I noticed it seemed a bit chilly. Oh, the thermostat was still off. This would have been at about 8AM. I walked over, looked at the temp, 50F in there so I turned it back on. I didn't really pay attention to the high temps yesterday but I would guess upper 30s maybe. The thermostat was still set to 65 and when I got home last night at a little past 10PM the temp had only come up 10F and it was 60F and still running. So it took about 14hrs (probably closer to 14.5hs) to come up 10F.

This is why in floor heat isn't really a good idea for say a pole barn that you are rarely in there. Unless it is basically free heat in the case where maybe you are running the pole barn and your house off one of those outdoor boilers. That said, if I were building a pole barn would I put the loops in the cement? Yes. That is because I would still insulate under the cement and at that point you are just buying some PEX and that isn't that much more money. Even if I didn't hook it up, it can't be easily retrofitted later. Maybe at some point I retire and I am out in that pole barn daily as it is my shop. Maybe at some point I would get an outdoor boiler where heat is basically free at that point. It also may make sense to install it fully and use the in floor to maintain 35-40F out there and then use a forced air system to bring it quickly to 60F or so when you go out there to work on weekends.

I don't have in floor heat in my pole barn and I have lots of issues with tools rusting from all the condensation from the cold slab come the hot humid days of June and July. I do have forced air and this weekend I started bumping up the temp out there. Normally it is set to 35F. I have it at 40F now and as outside temps warm I will slowly keep bumping it 5F every couple weeks as I start to warm that slab the only way I can.
 

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I don't have in floor heat in my pole barn and I have lots of issues with tools rusting from all the condensation from the cold slab come the hot humid days of June and July.
A ceiling fan help me out a lot and closing the windows in ours also helps a lot on those humid days.
 

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Discussion Starter #248
A ceiling fan help me out a lot and closing the widows in ours also helps a lot on those humid days.
I do have one out there.

Part of the problem is that there is just too much stuff out there for a ceiling fan to work all that great. Maybe I need more of them or a bigger one. It is just a small fan that I pulled out of our master bedroom when we upgraded that one. Since it still worked I figured why throw it away. Box fans seem to almost help more. I have been thinking about getting one of those bigger barn fans.

Last year was really bad because when we broke ground on the new garage, we severed the power lines feeding the pole barn. We were pretty sure this was going to happen so I had turned off the power before the excavator started and I disconnected the lines coming out of the panel in the house and going into the subpanel in the pole barn just so we didn't have to worry about ripping either off the wall. I didn't realize how long we would be without power out there or I would have run a temp feeder line. That building and of course all the others fed from it were dead from mid April until mid October. So no heat or fans.
 
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