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Discussion Starter #82
20k for rafters and stairs???

36x40' floor trusses are only $5300

My second floor will be 40x40' and the whole thing should cost about $5k. But then I'm building my own steel trusses.
That was the estimate we were given. There was more work than just that. We had some dormers so all that would have to be hand framed. The room was also going to be like a bowling ally. It would have been something like 16x52. But then complicated some other things because there would be "living space" above the garage. So now you need thicker drywall. So, I guess more than just trusses and stairs. But it would have been far from "finished space". There would have been no walls, no ceiling and just base subfloor. It would have been a lot more money to finish off the project. Being we are already in the $100-120K range, adding another $20K to the project for something that wasn't usable yet and would have been an odd space, didn't make much sense. We may be kicking our selves later but too late now. We have a tuck under garage that is about 32x32 which is completely wasted space. I want to reclaim that to living space. The house was built in 1962, the door opening on it is maybe 6'2" and our truck is too tall to fit in there. It also has the duct work cut to "heat it" which means if I start my car in there (the only thing that fits) all the exhaust fumes go right up into the bedrooms. Besides I leave for work at 4am and wake up the entire house. Because of the driveway slope, in the spring when we get the melt, water backs up under the garage door and floods the garage. At least it sits a little lower than the rest of the basement so that has never flooded. I would much rather take the $20K and close off the tuck under garage. Not enough to complete that project but it would close it off. By better insulating that space it we will likely save as much in heating costs as we will pay to keep the new garage at 60F all winter. Plus it adds a much larger foot print of usable living space as well as solves a bunch of "issues" that we have with our house.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
I'm glad I'm handy. My whole shop budget is 100k.
I wouldn't say I am not handy. I just don't have time as the main point and I know what I can do by myself without having to call in a bunch of favors for manual labor. So, the plan was to infuse cash to get it moving far enough to where I would take over once all the heavy lifting is done. Though in dealing with contractors it seems to be taking so long that I could have probably done it myself. It sounds like a lot but it really is a big project. Heck my cement work alone was north of $25K and I can't get him here to do it. The word as of this morning is he will be there with trucks on Saturday to do the garage floor as I need that in to get the patio door and access doors in so that I can have the company that is doing the siding out. They will be doing the entire house in LP Smartside along with one of the accessory buildings.
 

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Discussion Starter #86
Did that 25k for concrete include your block and footers?
Yes, same contractor. Block work, footings, the garage floor, floor drain, apron which will extend across where the blacktop driveway is today. Tearing out that section of blacktop as well as a patio out behind the garage. It didn't include excavation but did include leveling the garage as well as all other areas being poured.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
I guess for a good comparison in projects...

My neighbor is doing a garage addition as well. We were discussing our plans, he liked it and started his plans of adding on to his garage as a project about half the size of what we are doing. Where we are building a complete garage, he is just converting his double to add another double along side the existing. He is about as busy as we are with work and kids activities nearly every night. He broke ground last fall so about 5-6 months before us. The current stage that he is at.... Well, he has the footings in and the block work almost done. I was talking to him last night as I mentioned we should be getting cement tomorrow for the floor. I asked how his was coming along and he said he still needs to do another course of block but isn't sure when he will get to it. He doesn't want to mess with it now because it is so hot out. That and they like to go out on their boat on the weekends. I am not sure if he will have the structure up before the snow flies at this rate. Oh and he still has a 30' tall pine tree in the middle of his project site. I don't get why he didn't cut that down at the beginning rather than work around it. The tree removal was the first thing I did. Now he has to try and drop it without damaging his block work.

:unknown:
 

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Being self under-employed has it's perks. :laugh:

My big concern is how my body will handle the project, as I was in much better physical shape on the last shop build.

Building the joint is part of the fun though, so I wouldn't want to have to pay someone to do what I wanted to do in the first place. I also couldn't afford to do all I'm doing if I were paying competent labor to do it to my standards.

Trees gotta go before you layout your corners. That's a terrible oversight. I had 3 removed the week before my concrete guys showed up. I've got dozens to do up North before I start getting ready for footings.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
Being self under-employed has it's perks. :laugh:

My big concern is how my body will handle the project, as I was in much better physical shape on the last shop build.

Building the joint is part of the fun though, so I wouldn't want to have to pay someone to do what I wanted to do in the first place. I also couldn't afford to do all I'm doing if I were paying competent labor to do it to my standards.

Trees gotta go before you layout your corners. That's a terrible oversight. I had 3 removed the week before my concrete guys showed up. I've got dozens to do up North before I start getting ready for footings.
I totally agree there. I only have so much vacation and I can't always babysit. The good news is my work is flexible enough that I could be home during major phases not to babysit but to answer questions to clarify what I want and to point out potential issues. Like when they were about to start backfilling before they had the insulation in place on the inside of the block.

You hit a big point for me. It isn't the knowledge part of doing this that is the issue, it is the physical effort. I know how to climb a ladder and have no fear of heights (it is the stop at the end that hurts). It is just that with my balance issues, I shouldn't be up there. So, I really am forced to either take the risk or hire it out. Don't get me wrong, I would love to be in my 20s and have the time to do all this myself. Even if it is something I don't fully understand. I love learning new skills to be self reliant and I have a hard time asking others for help.
 

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Discussion Starter #90
And no cement showed up.... :banghead:

I reached out to the general contractor. He said that the cement guy is coming out once it stops raining today (just wrapping up now) and he will get the rebar laid as well as complete the forms for the garage doors and patio. Then be back Monday morning for the pour. We will see.

:munch:
 

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Discussion Starter #91
Well the cement contractor showed up today for a bit.

He didn't pour any cement. He did get the rebar down and the bulkheads (forms) in the doorways. So, they are ready to pour first thing Monday (7am). Weather looks good the next few days.

Of course then I identified an issue. Hey did you notice the in floor heat isn't pressurized? Cement guy won't pour unless it is pressurized. I agree. I text the general contractor. He contacts the heating guy who said it isn't a problem, they pour all the time without pressurizing. I don't like the sound of that. I tell him to talk to the cement guy because isn't isn't pouring. I pass on to the cement guy that they are not worried about it evidentially, he said that if there are leaks, it isn't on him. I agree and said I told the general contractor to call him so the two of them can be on the same page as I shouldn't play middle man in this. A little later I get a text from the general contractor that the heating guy will be out Sunday to pressurize the system. That sounds better.
 

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...just found this thread ...not sure if i am up to speed on it all yet LOL...

i did see many posts back where you were upset with yourself for having to dig 65' of trench .....my first thought was the back fill guy would probably have damaged it and then covered it up ...in my experience never trust a backfill guy without watching his every move

:good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #93
...just found this thread ...not sure if i am up to speed on it all yet LOL...

i did see many posts back where you were upset with yourself for having to dig 65' of trench .....my first thought was the back fill guy would probably have damaged it and then covered it up ...in my experience never trust a backfill guy without watching his every move

:good2:
Yeah. I was here while they were backfiling. I have been on site for the most part of every major phase. At least when there is stuff that can't be easily corrected. As you mentioned backfilling. I am lucky in that much of what I do for a living can technically be done anywhere. It is mainly the meetings that I need to be onsite for but even then most of those I can remotely connect to with Skype. :nunu:
 

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Discussion Starter #94
:yahoo:

We have cement!!!!!

2 trucks came and poured the garage floor and another came a little while later to pour the patio. In a few days we will start making more progress.
 

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Congrats... big step in the process.
 

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Discussion Starter #96
First truck



Pouring



Other side



Second Truck



Working on the floor



The third truck pulled between the garage and pole barn to pour the patio. I guess they use a different mix for the patio. Even if it was the same it was a little over 20 yards today so it would have been a third truck anyhow. Not sure how much in the patio but it was about 16 yards in the garage.



Patio behind the garage.

 

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Discussion Starter #97
I could only hang around until 11:30 today as I had an appointment and a meeting at the office. I was there for the entire pour process but they were still working on finishing when I had to go.

I have to go back and take some more photos of the finished cement work. I thought I had but when I was uploading these photos I didn't see any. It is too dark now and there is no power yet.

They used something call zip strips in the garage floor rather than cutting or forming control joints. They did control joints in the patio.
 

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FYI

usually they add whats called "air" to outside mixes it helps the concrete work better with the big temperature swings outside and freezing and thawing

zip strips make for very nice control joints ....someone will have to caulk/fill them later....the top pulls off the jt to make a perfect cavity for the joint

love the floor drain and floor heat setup.....extremely nice!!!

have you made the decision yet as to a floor sealer/coating?
 

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Discussion Starter #99 (Edited)
FYI

usually they add whats called "air" to outside mixes it helps the concrete work better with the big temperature swings outside and freezing and thawing

zip strips make for very nice control joints ....someone will have to caulk/fill them later....the top pulls off the jt to make a perfect cavity for the joint

love the floor drain and floor heat setup.....extremely nice!!!

have you made the decision yet as to a floor sealer/coating?
I saw them stacked up before they started pouring but I missed seeing them put them in the cement. So, I am not sure at what phase they did that. They were a T shaped plastic channel. With floor finished, I thought I would see them in the floor but I don't. Maybe they pull the top off like you said and smooth over the top. Not sure. I did set up a Virb Camera taking a time lapse that covered both areas. I haven't compiled it yet but it was a photo every 5 seconds for a total close to 8000 pictures.

We are planning on an epoxy finish this fall. We need to wait until the water content in the slab drops enough to safely coat so it will be a while. Another reason we wanted to get it poured sooner than later. I don't want to start to move stuff in only to have to take everything back out to finish the floor. I also want to get it sealed before we get into the winter were they are treating the roads with salt.

EDIT: I just noticed in one of the photos above, the second photo where it looks like a bunch of guys are standing around, in the corner of the shot the Zip Strips were leaning against the wall and are the grey strip that is blocking the lower left part of the shot.

So they were not installed at that point yet.
 

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minimum of 30days on epoxy (done a lot of industrial grade epoxy floors) best to moisture test the floor

on the zip strips they pour them in (hopefully strait) then finish the floor then pull/zip the top off to leave a cavity to fill.......i personally liked zip strips buy my concrete guy prefered to saw cut so we didnt use them very often
 
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