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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As others have suggested, rightly so, I am starting a new thread on my garage, etc. build project. This project started back in 2013 and is still continuing. The project included additions and modifications to the house along with moving the driveway, replacing retaining walls, quite a bit of grade change and landscaping along with the 30' x 34' two floor garage. Here are the before pictures.
 

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More before pictures!
 

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House chimney rebuild and closing in of the exposed part of our ranch house.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Now is when the real work started. Removing old steps, old retaining wall, digging!!! and installing drainage systems. The drainage system includes two drain boxes and over 100' of drainage pipes. All Down spouts and all driveway run off runs into the drainage system. The drainage system all runs into a 4' diameter x 16' long piece of ADS drain pipe buried in an 8' deep x 8' wide x 16' long hole. The hole has 2' of #4 ballast on the bottle, then the pipe, then #4 ballast around the sides and cover. The 10" main drain line empties into the top side of this pipe. This creates an underground drainage reservoir. And of course as usual, when digging allot of ditches, the potential is there that you may back into one of them. Well, that did happen, but only once. haha!!! What I will say, it wasn't me operating, at least that time!!!
 

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As others have suggested, rightly so, I am starting a new thread on my garage, etc. build project. This project started back in 2014 and is still continuing. The project included additions and modifications to the house along with moving the driveway, replacing retaining walls, quite a bit of grade change and landscaping along with the 30' x 34' two floor garage. Here are the before pictures.
Can you explain "Two floor"? Is it going to have a loft? or basement level. Like a walk out basement and an upper level too? :dunno: :munch:
 
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Garage build!! The garage build started by hauling 29 tri-axle dump truck loads of shale away to make the space in the bank to build the garage. Fortunately, the local township needed allot of fill, so they hauled it away. It also included changing the electrical service to the house. I ran the main 400 amp service underground from the utility pole to the garage. Then split 200 amp to the garage and 200 amp to the house. The service from the garage to the house is also underground. All the trenching for the electrical conduit, I dug with my 1025r.
The garage is 30' wide by 34' deep with an upstairs (tractor shed). The garage has a 12/12 pitch, so it has a high peak roof, which gives me a 20' wide x 34' long room upstairs. The upstairs room has 4' high knee walls and a 9' high ceiling in the middle. The upstairs garage door is 7'-6" high x 7" wide (high enough for the 1025 with the ROPS up).
 

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More pictures. Showing 400 amp meter base and garage bathroom plumbing.
 

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Now for the new masonry steps, retaining walls, landscaping, etc., etc. etc.!!! I dug the footer for the new steps and retaining walls along with all the drainage stone back-fill. I hired a landscape contractor to actually lay the retaining wall block. Too much work for me!! Those block are 80 lbs. each. I worked with them, using the 1025 to bucket all the drainage stone while they laid the block. I used my tamper to compact all the stone behind the walls. If there is one suggestion I can make to anyone that desires to install retaining walls, put lots of drainage stone behind them with 4" ADS drainage pipe at the bottom, compact the stone after each course of block and use geo-grid to tie the wall back into the drainage stone behind the wall at least every other course. This makes a wall that will not heave because of water retention behind the wall or vehicle load above the wall. My walls have been in two years now, have gone through two winters and no heaving and they look like the day they were installed. Yes, you will buy allot of drainage stone. My wife could not believe how much stone we put behind these walls. I don't know for sure how many ton of stone we got overall but, I would guess 30 ton.
All of the low voltage lighting, including all the retaining wall lights and the step rail lighting is wired lighting, no solar powered. I ran conduit under the step concrete before the steps were poured. The connection wiring from railing pole to railing pole runs through the rails. The retaining wall lights are fastened under the cap edge that hangs out over the wall about an 1". I installed conduit behind all the walls to feed the wiring to the retaining wall cap lights. All the outside lighting is LED. It is all controlled by one photo cell that activates a relay that turns the lighting on all at one time.
I designed the steps to fit in the space. The biggest problem that I had was being able to get the required number of step risers in the space that I had. The only way that I could do it was to have three steps that turned. I have to say, on paper it looked easy, building it was a different story. It took some thought to figure out how to form the steps and how many concrete pours it would take to actually build them. In the end, it took two different concrete pours to build them. First, bottom and mid level landings. Second, upper steps and three steps that turn and the two connecting straight steps.
 

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How the project looks today!! Still not done but much closer that it was in 2014!!
 

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Beautiful work. I can see you put a lot of thought into it and made some very
nice use of your topography. That upstairs garage door - well, that's just plain
brilliant. Well done sir, well done.
After I bought my 1025R, it didn't take me too long to realize, they wouldn't fit through a 7' high garage door with the ROPS up, so I immediately decided, that rear garage door would be 7'-6".
 

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Now for the new masonry steps, retaining walls, landscaping, etc., etc. etc.!!! I dug the footer for the new steps and retaining walls along with all the drainage stone back-fill. I hired a landscape contractor to actually lay the retaining wall block. Too much work for me!! Those block are 80 lbs. each. I worked with them, using the 1025 to bucket all the drainage stone while they laid the block. I used my tamper to compact all the stone behind the walls. If there is one suggestion I can make to anyone that desires to install retaining walls, put lots of drainage stone behind them with 4" ADS drainage pipe at the bottom, compact the stone after each course of block and use geo-grid to tie the wall back into the drainage stone behind the wall at least every other course. This makes a wall that will not heave because of water retention behind the wall or vehicle load above the wall. My walls have been in two years now, have gone through two winters and no heaving and they look like the day they were installed. Yes, you will buy allot of drainage stone. My wife could not believe how much stone we put behind these walls. I don't know for sure how many ton of stone we got overall but, I would guess 30 ton.
All of the low voltage lighting, including all the retaining wall lights and the step rail lighting is wired lighting, no solar powered. I ran conduit under the step concrete before the steps were poured. The connection wiring from railing pole to railing pole runs through the rails. The retaining wall lights are fastened under the cap edge that hangs out over the wall about an 1". I installed conduit behind all the walls to feed the wiring to the retaining wall cap lights. All the outside lighting is LED. It is all controlled by one photo cell that activates a relay that turns the lighting on all at one time.
I designed the steps to fit in the space. The biggest problem that I had was being able to get the required number of step risers in the space that I had. The only way that I could do it was to have three steps that turned. I have to say, on paper it looked easy, building it was a different story. It took some thought to figure out how to form the steps and how many concrete pours it would take to actually build them. In the end, it took two different concrete pours to build them. First, bottom and mid level landings. Second, upper steps and three steps that turn and the two connecting straight steps.
To begin with, Damn that looks nice. :thumbup1gif:

2005...http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/off-topic/2993-whos-cooler-than-me.html
Pretty much looks the same now.

Wish I had.
 

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That is really nice, great job. :bigthumb::bigthumb:
 

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I have been working on wiring the garage over the winter. Because the garage is over 1000 sq. ft., the rough in electrical work will have to be inspected. This will be the final inspection. YEA!!! After the inspection, I will actually get an occupancy authorization. In PA, this means the building can be used as living quarters. I figure if I get in the dog house with wifey, this way I will have a place to live!! HAHA! Just kidding. My wife is all in on this project!!
I looked at all the options for heating the garage, especially cost per BTU of heat. Wood, coal and fuel oil (at least right now for fuel oil) are the cheapest but I don't want to use up space or have the work of a wood of coal stove, so that leaves propane or electric. Cost per BTU, electric is not any more expensive than propane, in fact it is cheaper, so I chose electric. Also, electric doesn't have an open flame, just in case of any vapors that may be flammable. Also, the electric heaters will hang at the ceiling so no floor space loss, not to mention, I can install the electric heaters, no need to pay a contractor to install propane, and the initial cost of the install is crazy less expensive for electric compared to installing propane.

I installed a 60 amp sub-panel upstairs to power all the upstairs lighting and outlets. This option was much better than running separate circuits all the way from the main panel.

I also installed a 60 amp sub panel next to the main garage panel that is powered from the house panel. When I was building the garage, I thought about the fact that my emergency power generator system is connected to the house panel. Because the house panel main shuts off during emergency power, no power will get to the garage, therefore, the garage doors would have to be opened manually. With 10' wide by 8'-9" high garage doors, opening them manually can be done but I am not sure the wife could do that. So, I ran a 60 amp circuit to a sub-panel in the garage to power the garage doors and the exterior entrance door light. To explain this, the main power from the utility pole runs underground to a 400 amp meter based located on garage. The 400 amp enters the garage and is split in the electrical trough mounted below the panel. 200 amp is feed into the main panel in the garage and the other 200 amp is feed into a main disconnect in the garage. The 200 amp comes out of the disconnect and runs underground to the 200 amp panel in the house. So, the house panel is now a sub-panel.

My property is definitely a "Call Before You Dig" location!!!!!

I completed the framing for the bathroom, pulled the 3/4" PEX water feed line through the 1-1/2" PVC that I buried during construction and got allot of the wiring done. I probably have another two days of wiring work, then inspection time, then insulation and cover the ceilings and walls and of course, finally paint.

Sorry for some of the pictures being sideways and the panorama shots being a little wiggly. Haven't figured out how to upright pictures and just a little shaky taking them panorama shots!
 

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Garage build!! The garage build started by hauling 29 tri-axle dump truck loads of shale away to make the space in the bank to build the garage. Fortunately, the local township needed allot of fill, so they hauled it away. It also included changing the electrical service to the house. I ran the main 400 amp service underground from the utility pole to the garage. Then split 200 amp to the garage and 200 amp to the house. The service from the garage to the house is also underground. All the trenching for the electrical conduit, I dug with my 1025r.
The garage is 30' wide by 34' deep with an upstairs (tractor shed). The garage has a 12/12 pitch, so it has a high peak roof, which gives me a 20' wide x 34' long room upstairs. The upstairs room has 4' high knee walls and a 9' high ceiling in the middle. The upstairs garage door is 7'-6" high x 7" wide (high enough for the 1025 with the ROPS up).
This explains the two floors!

When I built my pole barn I wanted two stories, BUT local zoning said NO :nunu:. They said I could not exceed 15' in height :nunu:
 

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This explains the two floors!

When I built my pole barn I wanted two stories, BUT local zoning said NO :nunu:. They said I could not exceed 15' in height :nunu:
You gotta love local zoning. Our maximum height is 25'. I am right at the maximum. In fact, we had to go with a roof pitch of slightly lower than 12 - 12 to get the peak to 25'.
Because of all the changes that I made, I made plenty of trips to the township engineering companies office to verify everything BEFORE I STARTED!! I didn't have to get my drainage system engineered, although, the engineer at the Township Engineering Company gave me all the "numbers" that they use for run off. Square foot of roofs and square footage of driveway and then the formula to calculate the size of piping and the size drainage pit (for this part of the country). So, I did all the calculations and took them to him for approval. I am extremely happy with how my run off water is now controlled. No more erosion and continually scooping up top soil and putting it back where is supposed to be. It is nice living up on a hill but it does come with some pitfalls.
Like all water runs downhill!!
One of the advantages are the picture below! I took this picture from my new patio!

Nothing is easy now days!! Although, I guess I kind of understand it??? There are plenty of people that own property that have to deal with major run off from someone else's property. Anyway, I wanted mine to be right and surely didn't want to have some government person showing up after the fact telling me it was incorrect. So, I did all the planning and approval work first. :bigthumb:
 

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