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So summer time is upon us here in New England which means fall is just around the corner and then winter again. Last year I was lucky enough to only lose power twice and that was on warm fall days and I had no fear of pipes freezing. At my current home all our power comes in from the poles, nothing is under ground which leaves us very susceptible to loss of power due to downed trees. Last year the same tree that wiped out the lines to a few homes including mine clipped my new truck as well. While the ever looming plan of selling my home and acquiring a new one hopefully before fall, the planner/prepper/pessimist in me thinks I should still call an electrician and get the house wired up for a portable none the less. I've had it quotes a few times and I'm looking at $1k for the install by the electrician.

Over the last couple years after buying my first home, as I steadily acquire additional tools I try to make them as user friendly as possible and as reliable as possible. While I could certainly figure out how to rebuild the carb the EFI on my snowblower was quite nice as it isn't finicky about fuel or climate or temps etc etc. So with that in mind and the looming thought of losing power I stumbled upon the Generac site today. Low and behold I found they released a portable generator that's in the 8k range that has EFI...and it's not astronomically over priced.

Has anyone seen, looked into, or purchased one of these Generic XT8000EFI SKU# 7162 ?

Generac Power Systems - Best Portable and Inverter Generators

It's a pretty nice looking machine and has a lot of potential. MSRP on it is $1300. Most places don't carry it yet including electricgeneratorsdirect.com and they carry everything. The only place I found it that beat the MSRP was Costco, for $999. That's the same price as what I was interested in paying for the older GP8000E.

https://www.costco.com/Generac-XT8000-Electronic-Fuel-Injection-Generator-.product.100408954.html


What do you guys think? Any feedback or experience yet?
 
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Your first link threw me a bit. From the link, I thought this generator was an "inverter" generator for $1300 and I was giving serious consideration to replacing my existing generator. But, when I looked at the spec sheet it turns out it's not an inverter.

I have a 7500 watt Generac that looks about like yours. I've only had to use it a couple of times, but it fires right up when I need it. I do have to trickle charge the battery from time to time. (Your post reminds me that I need to change the oil before winter!) Generac is one of "the names" in generators so it would be hard to go wrong with one.

My only concern with the one that you posted is the Electronic Fuel Injection. Those with more mechanical knowledge than me can chime in on the reliability of EFI on a single cylinder engine. I'm old enough that all of my experience with single cylinder engines is with carburetors. Is EFI just one more thing that might go wrong? Of course, with EFI you won't have to worry about the carb gumming up from ethanol, but will the injector(s) gum up? Again, better mechanics than I can jump in to answer this.


$1000 might be just a bit on the high side to tie in the generator to your box. If memory serves, my install was more in the $500-750 range (parts and labor) about 5 years ago. That included the lock out switch on my panel, moving all of the breakers on the right side of the panel down a couple of slots, and replacing a couple of the single breakers with double breakers due to the lost space. It also included the power cord to attach the generator to the house. This was done by an actual electrical contractor (with 20 or so electricians on staff) and not by some guy doing work on the side. Of course, demand with the economy booming right now has probably raised electrician's pay, so the $1000 might be more reflective of today's market. Another factor could include the brand of your breaker panel.
 

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Generac has always been notorious for not self charging the battery while the generator is running. I noticed on this brochure it says "self charging while in use" but then on the spec sheet it says "battery wall charger adapter included".

So does it charge the battery or not?

Unfortunately Generac does not list the manual for the EFI model on their website which I find very strange.
 
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$1000 might be just a bit on the high side to tie in the generator to your box. If memory serves, my install was more in the $500-750 range (parts and labor) about 5 years ago. That included the lock out switch on my panel, moving all of the breakers on the right side of the panel down a couple of slots, and replacing a couple of the single breakers with double breakers due to the lost space. It also included the power cord to attach the generator to the house. This was done by an actual electrical contractor (with 20 or so electricians on staff) and not by some guy doing work on the side. Of course, demand with the economy booming right now has probably raised electrician's pay, so the $1000 might be more reflective of today's market. Another factor could include the brand of your breaker panel.
Same here... it's been about 5 years or so but it was $500 to install the interlock kit, mount the new breaker, install a weather proof generator plug outside, and provide a 20-foot power cable. The price also included the interlock itself which I believe was around $100.

I have a Honda EU6500i inverter generator and I know Honda has since come out with a EU7000i EFI version. I run non-Ethanol fuel to minimize any carb issues.
 

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Generac has always been notorious for not self charging the battery while the generator is running. I noticed on this brochure it says "self charging while in use" but then on the spec sheet it says "battery wall charger adapter included".

So does it charge the battery or not?

Unfortunately Generac does not list the manual for the EFI model on their website which I find very strange.
It charges the battery while running, but obviously can't charge the battery while it's not running. The "battery wall charger adapter" is to plug in the battery to keep it charged for those many months that most homeowners (myself included) are going to let their generator sit in between using it.

(I do try to start mine and let it run every few months - just in case. :good2:)
 

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Make sure you read a bunch of reviews before you buy. Generac has had some big problems with some models.
 

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It charges the battery while running, but obviously can't charge the battery while it's not running. The "battery wall charger adapter" is to plug in the battery to keep it charged for those many months that most homeowners (myself included) are going to let their generator sit in between using it.

(I do try to start mine and let it run every few months - just in case. :good2:)
OK... that makes sense. Given that charging the battery is new for them they could be a little clearer. Hopefully what they provide is a battery maintainer.

I do the same thing. I keep a battery tender on at all times and I give mine a run every 3 months during the summer and every month during winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Your first link threw me a bit. From the link, I thought this generator was an "inverter" generator for $1300 and I was giving serious consideration to replacing my existing generator. But, when I looked at the spec sheet it turns out it's not an inverter.

I have a 7500 watt Generac that looks about like yours. I've only had to use it a couple of times, but it fires right up when I need it. I do have to trickle charge the battery from time to time. (Your post reminds me that I need to change the oil before winter!) Generac is one of "the names" in generators so it would be hard to go wrong with one.

My only concern with the one that you posted is the Electronic Fuel Injection. Those with more mechanical knowledge than me can chime in on the reliability of EFI on a single cylinder engine. I'm old enough that all of my experience with single cylinder engines is with carburetors. Is EFI just one more thing that might go wrong? Of course, with EFI you won't have to worry about the carb gumming up from ethanol, but will the injector(s) gum up? Again, better mechanics than I can jump in to answer this.


$1000 might be just a bit on the high side to tie in the generator to your box. If memory serves, my install was more in the $500-750 range (parts and labor) about 5 years ago. That included the lock out switch on my panel, moving all of the breakers on the right side of the panel down a couple of slots, and replacing a couple of the single breakers with double breakers due to the lost space. It also included the power cord to attach the generator to the house. This was done by an actual electrical contractor (with 20 or so electricians on staff) and not by some guy doing work on the side. Of course, demand with the economy booming right now has probably raised electrician's pay, so the $1000 might be more reflective of today's market. Another factor could include the brand of your breaker panel.
You're correct it's not an inverter style like the Honda...otherwise the price skyrockets LOL. The only reason I prefer the EFI is because it can adapt better to environmental changes and also because ethanol free fuel isn't local by any means. My FIL and I go up to VT (4hrs) to pick up jugs of ethanol free fuel to get us through the winter and partly into spring. I had a couple guys provide me with quotes, all with multiple electricians on staff. Each one was around the 1k figure just to wire up the panel and a 30' 30A cord. I think they need to clean up the panel a little in order to get their switch tied into the panel.

Generac has always been notorious for not self charging the battery while the generator is running. I noticed on this brochure it says "self charging while in use" but then on the spec sheet it says "battery wall charger adapter included".

So does it charge the battery or not?

Unfortunately Generac does not list the manual for the EFI model on their website which I find very strange.
Id imagine it recharges during operation. Should you not run it in awhile and leave it storage you can plug it into the wall to maintain a charge on the battery. The efi module, if its anything like the one on my ariens snowblower, comes preprogrammed and needs to always have a minimal charge otherwise it forgets the programming and runs like crap.

Same here... it's been about 5 years or so but it was $500 to install the interlock kit, mount the new breaker, install a weather proof generator plug outside, and provide a 20-foot power cable. The price also included the interlock itself which I believe was around $100.

I have a Honda EU6500i inverter generator and I know Honda has since come out with a EU7000i EFI version. I run non-Ethanol fuel to minimize any carb issues.
Sounds like a much better install price. I wonder if they're beginning to jack up the prices as the demand increases. Can't entirely blame them, they have a living to make too.

It charges the battery while running, but obviously can't charge the battery while it's not running. The "battery wall charger adapter" is to plug in the battery to keep it charged for those many months that most homeowners (myself included) are going to let their generator sit in between using it.

(I do try to start mine and let it run every few months - just in case. :good2:)
That's what I assumed. Thanks for confirming it.

Make sure you read a bunch of reviews before you buy. Generac has had some big problems with some models.
New model and no reviews yet. It's barely released. Only place I can see it for sale is at Costco and there's about 40 reviews. I don't really enjoy reading the reviews of random folk of which many have little to no experience with engines, and equipment. Hell if it was up to them the thing would drive itself out of the garage and plug itself in :laugh:

OK... that makes sense. Given that charging the battery is new for them they could be a little clearer. Hopefully what they provide is a battery maintainer.

I do the same thing. I keep a battery tender on at all times and I give mine a run every 3 months during the summer and every month during winter.
 
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Looks nice, but i personally would want a dual fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It is funny. I was looking at the exact same unit yesterday after the flooding issues we have had here. I have been looking at the one from Lowes here: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Generac-XT-8000-Running-Watt-Portable-Generator-with-Generac-Engine/50013596
That's a different model without EFI. That model has been around for a little longer. It's probably a lowes exclusive only.

What's weird is I cannot find the XT model listed in ay of their brochures. I can't find it when searching at any places but lowes and the one I was looking at at Costco. I can't find anything about new launches of products or anything else. Now I'm intrigued as to where this model came from and where it stacks up.
 
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Another option for connecting a generator is Transfer Switch | Global Power Products

The utility company can pull your current meter out, put that in and then put the meter back on. You connect from the generator to the plug under the meter and it will auto transfer, then just use your normal breaker panel.

Your utility company may already sell them.
That's an interesting idea. Haven't seen that before.
 

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Makes line workers happy

Another option for connecting a generator is Transfer Switch | Global Power Products

The utility company can pull your current meter out, put that in and then put the meter back on. You connect from the generator to the plug under the meter and it will auto transfer, then just use your normal breaker panel.

Your utility company may already sell them.
I've seen those offered by the two companies in our area. I think it's both a money maker for the utility company and a way to protect their line workers from generators back feeding into the system. The line workers that come into our area hear generators running and make damn sure that cross connect safety cables are installed on both sides of the area they are working on.

Years ago I was working a summer job at a National Park when there was a power outage. No problem, it was a historical park except the sewage pumps needed juice. One maintenance guy was a licensed electrician and set up a pump to be fed by a generator. They had a substantial generator 50 kw or so, and after connecting it we fired it up, threw the breaker and it choked down and died in about a half second. I was a kid and had no clue but he turned white and realized he had back fed the power lines. Fortunately no one was working on them at the time.

I understand all too well why the power company would rather have a definite transfer switch than depend on homeowners remembering to throw the main breaker.

Treefarmer
 

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I understand all too well why the power company would rather have a definite transfer switch than depend on homeowners remembering to throw the main breaker.
As long as you use a proper transfer switch or interlock there is nothing to remember. The main breaker is mechanically locked out from the generator input breaker. A mechanical interlock will cost around $150.

I've been using one of these for about 5 years. As you can see, it is physically impossible to engage the generator breaker unless the main breaker is first turned off.

 

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As long as you use a proper transfer switch or interlock there is nothing to remember. The main breaker is mechanically locked out from the generator input breaker. A mechanical interlock will cost around $150.

I've been using one of these for about 5 years. As you can see, it is physically impossible to engage the generator breaker unless the main breaker is first turned off.

We have a solar system with a battery back up.

If our power goes out the batteries are automatically powering everything except one outlet.
In the breaker system for the solar there are breakers to shut off from the grid and they have a mechanical transfer plate that looks pretty much like yours. However we also have an automatic shut off installed by the Power Co. (no charge) that shuts our house off if the grid goes down. Just so there is no possibility of power flowing back and hurting workers. So we have both. The Power Co. demanded the auto disconnect box. And they came out and tested everything before they would give us power.

We originally want our system to be "behind the grid" or not to be able to feed back into the grid. The Power Co would have no knowledge of our system.
Before we got everything installed the Power Co made it so no more behind the grid systems. Installer either did as Power Co says or face having other systems not tied into the grid, all or nothing. "behind the grid" is what your gas generators are. I would bet that if the Power Co. found out you had a Generator that you'd have to have the automatic disconnect. Our Power Co. charges additional fees because we have a "power Generating System". I'd wonder if they would do the same if they knew someone had a generator.
 

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We originally want our system to be "behind the grid" or not to be able to feed back into the grid. The Power Co would have no knowledge of our system.Before we got everything installed the Power Co made it so no more behind the grid systems. Installer either did as Power Co says or face having other systems not tied into the grid, all or nothing. "behind the grid" is what your gas generators are. I would bet that if the Power Co. found out you had a Generator that you'd have to have the automatic disconnect. Our Power Co. charges additional fees because we have a "power Generating System". I'd wonder if they would do the same if they knew someone had a generator.
Why do you have two electric meters?

I've never heard of anything like what you describe above around here. My system was installed by a licensed electrician. There are lots of folks around here who have generators... some are auto start/switch and some are manual start/switch. The power company has no involvement.
 

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I looked on my power company’s site for the GenerLink transfer switch but didn’t find anything. However in another search I see that Home Depot sells it - guess you could have an electrition install one?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/GenerLink-30-Amp-Meter-Mounted-Transfer-Switch-MA23-N/301961623?cm_mmc=Shopping|THD|G|0|G-BASE-PLA-AllProducts|&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjqzPrZzH3AIVzIuzCh14yQzHEAQYASABEgI4lvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CMe06rKcx9wCFQ2syAodmxcHBw

I kind of like this solution. Once I add up a 6-way transfer switch and associated wiring it comes to close that amount. I like the meter mounted solution - nice, clean, and simple,
 

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Why do you have two electric meters?

I've never heard of anything like what you describe above around here. My system was installed by a licensed electrician. There are lots of folks around here who have generators... some are auto start/switch and some are manual start/switch. The power company has no involvement.
because the "regular" meter does not run backwards. So any Solar Gen. power I make and send into the grid would not be measured. so one meter reads what I take in and the other measures what I send out. Hopefully more out than in.

For some reason my Power Co. uses a meter that runs only one way. Our Solar was installed by a Co. that only does solar installations. They are very reputable and professional. They have done hundreds of installs in the area.

I don't doubt that Your Power Co. may have no involvement. I don't think ours would be involved if someone installs a gas generator either. Unless the Power Co. found out about it. Ours didn't care about "behind the grid" systems before about 1 1/2 years ago.
Like I mentioned now behind the grid systems using our Power Co. is no more.

I only mention it because a gen. system is essentially the same thing as my solar. Its a electricity generator. Does not matter if it the sun, a water wheel or an gas powered generator. They all generate electricity that has the potential of going back into the grid. That was our Power Co. concern, safety of lineman during power outage. In my area ALL Solar systems that are grid tied send back to the grid only, you do not use any power you generate directly, and if the grid goes down your out of power, even if its a sunny day and your panels have the potential of generating power. Unless you have a battery back-up, then the system will continue to run off the panels and the battery. Used to be 3 choices in solar systems in my area, off grid, behind the grid and grid tied, now there are only 2 choices.

When we installed our system one concern was having power when the grid goes down. We looked at gas generators and decided it added to much other issues. The gen. had to run, we would have to have gas on hand, more moving parts so to speak. So we went with a battery back-up. No moving parts, works with the solar. When the power goes out we can run indefinitely with out gas or outside "help".

I pay .0595/day for as they describe it "Generation Facilities". I pay approx. .014/kwh, if I send back more than I use I get .04/kwh.
Last electric bill we got I sent back 294kwh and I used 291kwh. So I go a credit of .13. After all the other charges I payed $17 for my July elec. bill.
 
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